Extra Extra : Justice (courts/crime/law)

A star player accused, and a flawed rape investigation

Yet another university community has been accused of denying justice to a female sexual assault victim in order to protect a star male athlete. The New York Times today chronicled the shortcomings of an investigation by Tallahassee police into a reported sexual assault in which Florida State University quarterback Jameis Winston was the alleged assailant.

Police failed to conduct a proper investigation when the incident was reported, the Times found. Even after the accuser identified her attacker to the police, Winston was never interviewed and DNA evidence was not collected. By the time prosecutors began to investigate 11 months later ...

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The truth about Chicago’s crime rates

Chicago magazine spent a year studying the Chicago Police Department’s crime stats – numbers that appeared to be too good to be true. And they were. Reporters looked at public and internal records, and interviewed crime victims, criminologists and police sources. Here's what they found:

We identified 10 people, including (20-year-old Tiara) Groves, who were beaten, burned, suffocated, or shot to death in 2013 and whose cases were reclassified as death investigations, downgraded to more minor crimes, or even closed as noncriminal incidents—all for illogical or, at best, unclear reasons. 

This troubling practice goes far beyond murders, documents ...

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Extra Extra Monday: Accident reports, deportations and school finances

Jail Crunch | Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project

OCCRP reporters filed freedom of information requests to prison authorities across Eastern Europe. The interactive visualization is a compilation of the data received from each prison authority, organized to demonstrate similarities and differences between prison demographics and crime categories across the region.

OCCRP journalists conducted dozens of interviews with convicted criminals throughout Eastern Europe. The videos are an extension of the Jail Crunch visualization and provide a personal window into how crime works in the region.

 

Drivers pay for accident reports | Atlanta Journal-Constitution

A private company that sells vehicle accident reports for ...

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Jared Remy took advantage of court system, murdered girlfriend

Jared Remy had glided through his first five criminal cases, but prosecutors thought the sixth one would be different.

Compared to what he had been charged with in the past — beating and choking his ex-girlfriend while she held their baby, cracking a friend over the head with a beer bottle in a jealous fit, elbowing and cursing out a police officer — the case that landed in Lowell District Court in January 2001 seemed minor: Threatening to commit a crime.

But for the first time, prosecutors had a victim willing to testify against Remy, son of one of the most beloved ...

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Fugitives Next Door: Police won’t chase 186,000 felony suspects

Across the United States, police and prosecutors are allowing tens of thousands of wanted felons — including more than 3,300 people accused of sexual assaults, robberies and homicides — to escape justice merely by crossing a state border, a USA TODAY investigation found. Those decisions, almost always made in secret, permit fugitives to go free in communities across the country, leaving their crimes unpunished, their victims outraged and the public at risk.

Read the USA TODAY report. Check out some of the local reporting that’s come out of the project.

State Attorney Angela Corey has put 21 on death row since 2009

Since taking office in 2009, State Attorney Angela Corey has had the chance to speak to a lot of people trying to get their loved ones’ killers sentenced to death. She has put more people on Death Row than any other prosecutor in Florida.

Corey’s office has sent 21 people to Death Row, and 18 of them are still there with the other three getting off Death Row on appeal. No other current prosecutor in the state has put more than seven people on Death Row since the start of 2009.

Extra Extra Monday: American Indian casinos, oil field fatalities, student absenteeism

Suicide rate hits 25-year high in region | Poughkeepsie (N.Y.) Journal

Craig Russell Wishnick is one of 238 residents of Dutchess and Ulster counties to die by suicide in the five years ending in 2011, 73 more than in the five years ending in 2003, according to a Poughkeepsie Journal analysis of death certificates over a 13-year period. That is an increase in harder-hit Dutchess of 62 percent and the first hike in the county rate after a quarter-century of steady and solid decline.

 

Does Utah’s air pollution increase school absences? | The Salt Lake Tribune

Health problems are a ...

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Extra Extra Monday: Assisted living centers, GPS ankle monitors, and the greyhound racing industry

Assisted living facility ordered to close after abuse, unsafe conditions found | Green Bay (Wisc.) Press Gazette

The state has ordered a Suamico assisted living facility to close after inspectors found physical and mental abuse of residents at the hands of the facility administrator, a registered sex offender.

Former Longview Terrace Administrator Jason Tegge is accused of taunting and hitting residents, many of whom are mentally ill or struggling with addiction, during his tenure at the facility, according to inspection records obtained by Press-Gazette Media from the state Department of Health Services Division of Quality Assurance.

Project | VideoInspection Records

 

GPS ...

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Calif. teacher's aide kept working after border drug bust

A California special education substitute was allowed to stay in the classroom after he was arrested at the border with more than $500,000 worth of cocaine and methamphetamine, according to a report from NBC 7.

While state law requires law enforcement agencies to notify school officials about such arrests, the San Diego TV station found that “there's no similar federal law or mechanism for notifying schools of federal arrests.”

 

Family wants DNA testing after FBI admits error in 1983 murder case

During the 26 years that James Preston spent incarcerated for murder, he always told his family that he didn't commit the crime.
            
Now, the FBI says their analyst's testimony about key hair evidence in the case exceeded the boundaries of science, raising the possibility that Preston, who died in custody, was wrongfully convicted if not, as his family believes, innocent.
            
"I sat with him as he passed away and I kissed him and I told him, I said, ‘I'll let everybody know that this is not right, this is not true, and you shouldn't be here ...

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