Extra Extra : Transportation

This Is What Happens to Your Bike After It’s Stolen

The actual number of bikes stolen in Seattle last year was likely far greater than the reported 1,121, the Seattle Met reports. A study in Montreal found that while about half of the city’s cyclists had been victims of bike theft, only about a third (one-sixth of all cyclists) reported their theft to police. Here, where biking, like espresso and drizzle, is part of the city’s essence, an estimated 4.1 percent of commutes are by bike, according to the Seattle Department of Transportation.

And it’s probably going to get worse. The city is pouring as ...

Read more ...

Extra Extra Monday: Florida law allows troubled charter operators to keep running schools

Shuttered: Florida’s Failed Charter Schools | Naples Daily News

As charter schools have boomed in Florida — 622 operated in 2013-14, up from 257 in 2003-04 — many have also busted. Since charter schools were first permitted in 1996, 269 out of nearly 900 opened charter schools have closed, a failure rate of about 30 percent. That tally includes six schools closed in Lee County and two closed in Collier County.

To better understand Florida’s charter school failings, the Daily News undertook a first-of-its-kind task, examining all charter schools that have closed since 2008. The newspaper reviewed hundreds of closure documents ...

Read more ...

Aggressive police take hundreds of millions of dollars from motorists not charged with crimes

They were pulled over for a minor traffic violation and, instead of getting just a ticket, they had their money confiscated by police. An aggressive brand of policing has led to the seizure of hundreds of millions of dollars in cash from American motorists and others not charged with crimes. It’s a largely hidden side effect of the government’s push to have the police become the eyes and ears of homeland security on highways since the 9/11 terror attacks.

In a three-part series, The Washington Post examines how thousands of people have been forced to fight legal ...

Read more ...

Pedestrians dying at disproportionate rates in America's poorer neighborhoods

A national analysis of traffic fatality data finds that, in most areas, it’s the poorer neighborhoods that experience the highest pedestrian death rates.

Governing magazine analyzed accident location data for more than 22,000 pedestrian fatalities reported in federal data from 2008-2012. Within metro areas, low-income census tracts recorded fatality rates approximately twice that of more affluent neighborhoods. Similarly, tracts with poverty rates below the national rate of 15 percent registered 5.3 deaths per 100,000 residents over the five-year period. By comparison, poorer neighborhoods where more than a quarter of the population lived in poverty had a ...

Read more ...

Extra Extra Monday: Peace Corps medical care, homeless students in the suburbs, license plate cameras

Trail of medical missteps in a Peace Corps death | The New York Times

A Peace Corps spokeswoman called Nick Castle’s death, from a gastrointestinal illness, “a tragic experience.” To examine its own conduct, the agency took the unusual step of engaging an outside American expert, whose report concluded that despite medical missteps by a Peace Corps doctor who missed signs of serious illness, Mr. Castle’s death could not have been prevented.

But the story of his death — pieced together from interviews and confidential reports and documents, including his autopsy — raises serious questions about Peace Corps medical care and ...

Read more ...

Extra Extra Monday: ATF stings, voter fraud and the new subprime bubble

Investigation: ATF drug stings targeted minorities | USA TODAY

The nation's top gun-enforcement agency overwhelmingly targeted racial and ethnic minorities as it expanded its use of controversial drug sting operations, a USA TODAY investigation shows.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives has more than quadrupled its use of those stings during the past decade, quietly making them a central part of its attempts to combat gun crime. The operations are designed to produce long prison sentences for suspects enticed by the promise of pocketing as much as $100,000 for robbing a drug stash house that does not ...

Read more ...

Red light cameras tag thousands for undeserved tickets

Thousands of Chicago drivers have been tagged with $100 red light fines they did not deserve, targeted by robotic cameras during a series of sudden spikes in tickets that city officials say they cannot explain, a Chicago Tribune investigation has found.

The Tribune's analysis of more than 4 million tickets issued since 2007 and a deeper probe of individual cases revealed clear evidence that the deviations in Chicago's network of 380 cameras were caused by faulty equipment, human tinkering or both.

Commissioner uses Tennessee state troopers as chauffeurs

Tennessee Safety Commissioner Bill Gibbons is using state troopers as chauffeurs, according to a hidden-camera investigation by WTVF-Nashville.

State officials stand by the decision, saying that the commissioner’s time is valuable and that the drivers provide more time for him to answer emails.

Emails show that troopers drove Gibbons at least 31 times in a two-and-a-half year period.

Hit-and-Run Sentencing Can Depend on Jurisdiction, Analysis Finds

"Location can make a difference in sentencing for hit-and-run motorists who leave injured victims behind, according to an analysis by Rocky Mountain PBS I-News into what some are calling Colorado’s ongoing hit-and-run epidemic.

The analysis, part of an ongoing collaboration between I-News and 9News, looked at sentences imposed by large Front Range judicial districts between 2009 and 2013 for the felony charge of hit-and-run resulting in serious injury."

Read the full story from Rocky Mountain PBS here.

Do hidden cracks imperil Bay Bridge?

"On June 8, The Sacramento Bee reported that in 2006 the California Department of Transportation approved an inexperienced Chinese company, unaccustomed to  U.S. construction rules, to fabricate the new Bay Bridge suspension span tower and roadway. The choice partly explains why costs ballooned to $6.5 billion and misgivings emerged about the quality of the bridge.

Today The Bee reports on how and why Caltrans allowed cracks in work by the Chinese firm to remain in the roadway of the new San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, contrary to the welding code. It shows how Caltrans neglected to study the impact ...

Read more ...