Tags : aviation

New webinar focuses on data journalism for broadcasters

KTVB-Boise investigative reporter Jamie Grey explains how to get started on data projects, offering story ideas and tips for visualizing data on air. She walks through several examples including:

  • Finding stories in airport and flight data
  • Analyzing interstate crash data using basic Excel techniques
  • Charting population change using driver's license data
  • Using county jail data to determine the cost of recidivism
  • Turning quick-hit stories using post-election and bridge data

Grey's presentation is designed for broadcast journalists, but would be good for anyone looking to get started in data journalism.

"Data Journalism for Broadcasters" is the latest in a ...

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Coverage guide for aviation safety

A Boeing jetliner operated by the airline Asiana crashed and caught fire at San Francisco International Airport on its arrival from Seoul on Saturday, killing at least two people and injuring more than 100 others. The National Transportation Safety Board has announced it will investigate, but it could take years to determine the cause of the crash.

For journalists covering the crash, the IRE Resource Center has an Aviation coverage guide that will help you figure out what background you need to know, what questions to ask and key sources in the aviation industry. In it, you’ll find several ...

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Data show activity at local airports

Airport numbers and trends seem to be a hot topic everywhere because flight activity is so directly tied to the economy and local businesses and is a concern for people who just want to fly for pleasure.

Our airport in Boise often gives us information and is very easy to work with. However, no reports broke down the actual numbers at the airport by flights and passengers.  Once I dug through some easily available federal data, I found the airport wasn’t performing at pre-recession numbers like many thought or expected, but was doing worse than than 10 years ago ...

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Making sense of incomplete bird-strike data

It’s almost a tradition in Washington. If you’ve got some bad news to release, put it out on a Friday and hope it gets no more than a for-the-record story that many will overlook.

That’s not to say the Federal Aviation Administration was hoping for an under-the-radar reception when it released its database of aircraft wildlife strikes on a Friday morning in April. Still, the difficulties of doing a substantial story on a Friday, when many in the government are getting ready to leave town, were there nonetheless.

When a US Airways plane carrying 155 people crash-landed ...

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