Several members of Investigative Reporters and Editors were among journalists recognized in the 2015 Pulitzer Prizes on Monday.

  • The Post and Courier of Charleston, SC won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for “Till Death Do Us Part,” a series that looked at a deadly trend of domestic violence against women. IRE members Doug Pardue, Glenn Smith and Natalie Caula Hauff contributed to the investigation.
  • The staff of the Seattle Times won the Breaking News Reporting award for their coverage of a landslide that killed 43 people. IRE members Mike Baker, Ken Armstrong, Hal Bernton, Justin Mayo, Jim Neff, Cheryl Phillips and Katrina Barlow contributed to the series.
  • Eric Lipton of the New York Times won one of two awards for Investigative Reporting. His reporting revealed how lobbyists sway congressional leaders and state attorney generals.
  • The Wall Street Journal won the second award for Investigative Reporting for “Medicare Unmasked.” The project provided an unprecedented look at confidential data on health care providers. IRE members John Carreyrou, Chris Stewart, Rob Barry, Tom McGinty, Martin Burch, Jon Keegan and Stuart Thompson contributed to the story.
  • Rebecca Kimitch of the Daily Breeze in Torrance, CA was one of three reporters from the paper to win the prize for Local Reporting. Kimitch and her colleagues looked into widespread corruption in a small school district.

Several IRE members were among Pulitzer Prize finalists as well.

  • Walt Bogdanich of The New York Times was a finalist for the National Reporting prize. Bogdanich and a colleague exposed the flawed rape investigation of involving a star Florida State University quarterback and the preferential police treatment given to football players accused in other crimes. 
  • The Boston Globe was a finalist for the Public Service prize for its multimedia coverage of a poorly regulated, profit-driven college housing system. IRE members Jenn Abelson and Todd Wallack contributed to the investigation.
  • The Wall Street Journal also was a finalist for Public Service prize for its reporting on “Deadly Medicine,” which revealed that women undergoing a common surgery face a significant cancer risk. IRE members Jennifer Levitz, Jon Kamp and Joseph Walker contributed to the work.
  • David Jackson of the Chicago Tribune was a finalist for the Investigative Reporting Prize. Jackson and two other colleagues exposed the perils faced by abused children in the state’s residential treatment centers.
  • Janet Roberts and John Shiffman of Reuters were finalists for the Explanatory Reporting Prize. Along with another colleague, they used data to reveal how a group of lawyers get special access to the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • Joe Mahr of the Chicago Tribune was a finalist for the Local Reporting award. Mahr and his colleagues used public records and human sources to investigate government corruption in a Chicago suburb.
  • Ziva Branstetter and Cary Aspinwall of the Tulsa World were finalists for Local Reporting for their courageous coverage of a botched execution in Oklahoma.
  • Marisa Taylor of McClatchy Newspapers was a finalist for the National Reporting prize. Along with two of her colleagues, Taylor reported on the Senate Intelligence Committee’s report on CIA torture.
  • Richard Marosi of the Los Angeles Times was a finalist for the International Reporting prize. Marosi revealed the horrific conditions facing Mexican workers supplying vegetables to American supermarkets.