Several members of Investigative Reporters and Editors were among the journalists recognized in the 2017 Pulitzer Prizes:

  • Sarah Ryley, along with the New York Daily News and ProPublica, won the Pulitzer for Public Service for exposing the NYPD’s abuse of eviction rules and eviction of hundreds of people.
  • The East Bay Times won the Breaking News Reporting prize for its coverage of the Oakland “Ghost Ship” fire and the government missteps in preventing the tragedy.
  • Eric Eyre of the Charleston Gazette-Mail won the award for Investigative Reporting for reporting on the massive flow of opioids into West Virginia counties at the center of the opioid epidemic.
  • Reporters from the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, McClatchy and The Miami Herald won the prize for Explanatory Reporting for their work on the “Panama Papers” series. They were also named a finalist in the International Reporting category.
  • The Salt Lake Tribune won the Local Reporting Pulitzer for its reporting on the unfair and harsh treatment of sexual assault victims at Brigham Young University.
  • The New York Times won the award for International Reporting for its work on exposing Vladimir Putin’s attempts to exert Russian influence abroad.

 

Several members were also recognized as finalists:

  • The Chicago Tribune was a finalist for the Public Service award for its innovative reporting on unsafe pharmacy practices that lead to the sale of drugs in dangerous combinations.
  • The Houston Chronicle was a finalist for the Public Service award for its investigation into the denial of special education services for tens of thousands of children in Texas.
  • The Dallas Morning News was a finalist for the Pulitzer for in Breaking News Reporting for its coverage of the deadly Dallas shooting spree that claimed the lives of five police officers and injured nine others.
  • The Orlando Sentinel was also a finalist for the Pulitzer for in Breaking News Reporting for covering the Pulse nightclub massacre.
  • Michael J. Berens and Patricia Callahan of the Chicago Tribune were finalists for the Investigative Reporting prize for revealing abuse, neglect and death at Illinois group homes for developmentally disabled adults.
  • Steve Reilly of USA TODAY Network was also an Investigative Reporting prize finalist for his data-heavy project revealing thousands of teachers across the country left unpunished for disciplinary violations.
  • Jeff Larson and Terry Parris Jr., along with colleagues from ProPublica, were finalists for the Pulitzer in Explanatory Reporting for their work explaining the impact that algorithms have in shaping criminal justice, social media and online shopping.
  • Jenna Russell and Todd Wallack, along with colleagues from the Boston Globe, were finalists for the Local Reporting award for their examination into psychiatric hospital closures leading to dangers for mentally ill people and their loved ones and lethal police encounters.
  • Robert Gebeloff, along with colleagues from The New York Times, was also a Local Reporting award finalist for exposing the disparity between minority and white inmate punishment rates in New York state prisons.
  • Steve Stecklow and Irene Jay Liu, along with colleagues from Reuters, were finalists for the National Reporting Pulitzer for uncovering American officials welcoming full-tuition foreign students despite standardized test cheating in Asia.
  • The Atlanta Journal-Constitution was also a National Reporting Pulitzer finalist for its series exposing widespread, unpunished sexual misconduct by doctors in Georgia and across the U.S.
  • Chris Hamby of BuzzFeed News was a finalist for the prize in International Reporting for his expose of how multinational corporations use a secretive dispute-settlement process to defy domestic and environmental regulations.
  • The Wall Street Journal was an International Reporting prize finalist for its coverage of Turkey’s governmental turmoil.