Several members of Investigative Reporters and Editors were among the journalists recognized in the 2018 Pulitzer Prizes:

  • The New York Times and The New Yorker won the Pulitzer for Public Service for exposing sexual predators in positions of power and launching a worldwide movement to bring sexual abuse to light.
  • The Press Democrat in Santa Rosa, California, won the Breaking News Reporting prize for its live coverage and follow-up reporting on devastating wildfires in Santa Rosa and Sonoma County.
  • The Washington Post won the Investigative Reporting prize for uncovering Senate candidate Roy Moore’s past sexual harassment of teenage girls in Alabama.
  • The Arizona Republic and USA Today Network won the Explanatory Reporting prize for examining the ramifications of President Donald Trump’s promise to build a wall along the southern U.S. border.
  • The Cincinnati Enquirer won the Local Reporting prize for its reporting on the devastating effects of the deadly heroin epidemic on the Cincinnati area.
  • The New York Times and The Washington Post won the National Reporting prize for their coverage on Russian interference with the 2016 presidential election.
  • Clare Baldwin and colleagues from Reuters won the International Reporting prize for their reporting on Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte’s killing campaign during the country’s drug war.
  • John Archibald of Alabama Media Group won the Commentary prize for his pieces scrutinizing corrupt politicians and advocating for the rights of women.

 

Several members were also recognized as finalists:

  • The Kansas City Star was a finalist for the Public Service award for exposing a culture of secrecy in Kansas’ state government.
  • The Houston Chronicle was a finalist for the Pulitzer in Breaking News Reporting for its coverage of Hurricane Harvey.
  • The New York Times was a finalist for the Pulitzer in Breaking News Reporting for its reporting on the Las Vegas mass shooting.
  • Tim Eberly of the Virginian-Pilot was a finalist for the Investigative Reporting prize for reporting on the three-strikes law in Virginia’s parole system, which wrongfully designated first-time convicts as repeat offenders with no hope of parole.
  • ProPublica was a finalist for the Explanatory Reporting prize for its reporting on maternal deaths in the U.S.
  • Jason Grotto, Sandhya Kambhampati and Ray Long of Chicago Tribune and ProPublica Illinois were finalists for the Local Reporting prize for their reporting on flawed assessments in Chicago that harmed working class minority neighborhoods.
  • The Boston Globe was a finalist for the Local Reporting award for its data-driven coverage of Boston’s history of racism.
  • Amy Julia Harris and Shoshana Walter of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting were finalists for the National Reporting award for their reporting on court-mandated drug rehab programs that provided private industries with laborers.
  • Brett Murphy of USA Today Network was a finalist for the National Reporting award for his data-driven narrative on the widespread exploitation of port truckers.
  • BuzzFeed News was a finalist for the International Reporting award for its coverage of operatives with ties to Vladimir Putin who have killed his perceived enemies in the U.S. and U.K.
  • Stuart Thompson and colleagues from The New York Times were finalists for the Editorial Writing prize for their series arguing that people with a history of domestic violence should be banned from owning guns.