State lawmakers often blur the line between the public’s business and their own

The Center for Public Integrity and The Associated Press partnered on a deep-dive that looked into the financial disclosures of state legislators nationwide. The investigation found numerous instances when lawmakers supported bills that benefited their employers, industries or even their personal finances. The Center also created a searchable library of the disclosures for 6,933 state…

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Malpractice lawsuits rarely lead to discipline in Florida

The Florida Department of Health is required to review every medical malpractice lawsuit filed against Florida doctors to identify and punish problem doctors. But those reviews rarely lead to discipline, a South Florida Sun-Sentinel investigation found.  The department has reviewed nearly 24,000 resolved state and federal lawsuits against doctors over the past decade but has…

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Decades-long struggle to secure U.S.-Mexico border

inewsource partnered with KPBS for this in-depth, multimedia project. As part of it, reporters used previously undisclosed data to create an interactive map that shows every mile of the current U.S.-Mexico border wall along with when it was constructed. The map is layered with information on illegal immigration patterns and enforcement over the decades.

Secretary of Commerce aide cuts trade deal with China while serving on board of shipping company tied to Russia

An APM Reports investigation found that Wendy Teramoto, chief of staff to U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, had a conflict of interest when she helped cut a trade deal with China to increase U.S. exports of natural gas. When she cut the deal, Teramoto was also serving on the board for Navigator Holdings Ltd.,…

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Judges steer defendants into work camps for private industry

Across the country, judges increasingly are sending defendants to rehab instead of prison or jail. These diversion courts have become the bedrock of criminal justice reform, aiming to transform lives and ease overcrowded prisons.  But in the rush to spare people with addiction from prison, judges are steering defendants into rehabs that often are little…

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EPA can’t account for all properties in Pennsylvania cleanup

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – using agency data – cannot precisely account for all the properties near a Pennsylvania battery plant with lead-to-soil concentrations that met the cleanup threshold a decade ago, the Reading Eagle has learned. The EPA has maintained that residential properties in Laureldale and Muhlenberg Township near Exide Technologies with lead…

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South Dakota’s mental health spending shortchanges early treatment for kids

A series of stories from the Argus Leader investigate the mental health care gaps for children in South Dakota. State officials vowed to improve the reach of providers in 2003, after finding out more than half of children who qualified for help weren’t getting care from community-based mental health centers. More than a decade later,…

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Questionable payments to Oregon ranchers who blame wolves for missing cattle

An EarthFix examination found Oregon has made a questionable pattern of wolf compensation payments to Oregon ranchers that contradict established knowledge of the state’s wolf population. With no consistent system for verifying unfound livestock losses, the state has little way of knowing for sure whether it’s denying some ranchers their due compensation or paying out…

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The slow-motion unraveling of New Mexico’s Medicaid crackdown

Four years after New Mexico accused 15 organizations of Medicaid fraud, many are out of business despite a clean sweep of exonerations. New Mexico In Depth takes a look at the status of some of the state’s cases. Teambuilders Counseling Service closed shortly after the state accused it of fraud. After years of receiving estimates…

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Federal hospitals fail Native Americans

The Indian Health Service, a federal agency that serves Native Americans, failed to meet minimum U.S. standards for medical facilities in some of the poorest areas of the country, an investigation by The Wall Street Journal has found. It turned away gravely ill patients and caused unnecessary deaths. These IHS hospitals repeatedly failed inspections, shut…

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