Overdoses, bedsores, broken bones: What happened when a private-equity firm sought to care for society’s most vulnerable

Roughly 25,000 patients were exposed to increasing health risks at an underfunded nursing-home chain, an investigation from The Washington Post found.  The ManorCare chain was owned by Carlyle Group, one of the wealthiest private-equity firms in the world. ManorCare had struggled financially until it filed for bankruptcy in March, and in the previous five years,…

Read more »

Washington psychiatric hospital described as “hell”

An Associated Press investigation has found that hundreds of patients at Washington state’s largest psychiatric hospital live in conditions that fail U.S. health and safety standards, while overworked nurses and psychiatrists say they are navigating a system that punishes employees who speak out despite critical staffing shortages.

As patients suffer, companies profits

The Dallas Morning News spent a year looking into privatized Medicaid in Texas and found systemic denials of care for the most vulnerable people are fueling profits for health care companies. Dallas News uncovered the story of a toddler who was left brain dead after a health care company denied his parents’ requests for round-the-clock…

Read more »

Families confront dementia and guns

A four-month Kaiser Health News investigation uncovered dozens of cases across the United States in which people with dementia used guns to shoot themselves or others. From news reports, court records, hospital data and public death records, KHN found 15 homicides and more than 60 suicides since 2012, although there are likely more. The shooters…

Read more »

The rise of opioid use is causing more babies to be born already addicted

A Crain’s Chicago Business investigation found that the number of babies born with withdrawal symptoms as a result of their mothers using drugs during pregnancy is rising, especially in Illinois. It costs nearly $34,000 for a typical Illinois hospital to treat a baby suffering withdrawal, compared to the $4,000 it costs to treat a baby…

Read more »

As surgery centers boom, patients are paying with their lives

An investigation by Kaiser Health News and the USA TODAY Network discovered that more than 260 patients have died since 2013 after in-and-out procedures at surgery centers across the country. Dozens — some as young as 2 — have perished after routine operations, such as colonoscopies and tonsillectomies, because surgery centers are not equipped with…

Read more »

Expose of New Jersey’s broken medical examiner system

Lost body parts, innocent people sent to jail and child deaths going without proper investigation — all are the result of New Jersey’s dysfunctional medical examiner system, which has been known for decades as a national disgrace. An analysis of more than 420,000 death records by NJ Advance Media revealed New Jersey’s understaffing and crushing…

Read more »

Malpractice lawsuits rarely lead to discipline in Florida

The Florida Department of Health is required to review every medical malpractice lawsuit filed against Florida doctors to identify and punish problem doctors. But those reviews rarely lead to discipline, a South Florida Sun-Sentinel investigation found.  The department has reviewed nearly 24,000 resolved state and federal lawsuits against doctors over the past decade but has…

Read more »

Lax oversight leaves patients at risk in Medicaid rides program

Georgia Medicaid patients have had their heads bashed, bones broken, their faces, and hands and knees lacerated in incidents that could have been avoided. They’ve been propelled out of wheelchairs or dropped from stretchers onto hard concrete, left with painful injuries that made their already-difficult lives even worse. Yet, despite years of such incidents, and…

Read more »

Pain doctors soak up profits by screening urine for drugs

A data-driven investigation by Kaiser Health News revealed that spending on urine screens and related genetic tests quadrupled from 2011 to 2014 to an estimated $8.5 billion a year — more than the entire budget of the Environmental Protection Agency. Yet there are virtually no national standards regarding who gets tested, for which drugs and…

Read more »