Schedule details

  • Outside Event

    Finding money stories in census data (Sponsored by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism)

    Speaker: Evan Wyloge of The Desert Sun

    Free pre-conference workshop on June 3.

    Learn how to use money-related census data and combine that with local data sets to generate new investigative angles and report original, high-impact data-driven stories in a free pre-conference workshop by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism from 2-5 p.m. Wednesday, June 3. The session will provide journalists at all levels with story ideas that they can take home and report.

    The workshop will be led by Evan Wyloge, senior reporter at the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, an independent, nonprofit media organization dedicated to statewide accountability journalism in Arizona. Wyloge, most recently a new media specialist at Arizona Capitol Times, has worked as a journalist for more than a decade, focused on accountability and watchdog reporting, with an emphasis on data analysis. He has a master’s degree in journalism from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and a previous degree in political science. 

    Sign up for this free workshop.

    Franklin 3&4

    2:00 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Franklin Hall

    3:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Conference Registration (Thursday)

    Registration will be located on the 4th floor of the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. 

    Franklin Hall Foyer

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Thursday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.  Sales will be located on the 4th floor of the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown.

    Franklin Hall Foyer

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Room 414-415

    8:30 am - 9:00 am

  • Panel

    Welcome and overview of the conference

    **Presented by IRE staff

    If you're new to the IRE Conference, haven't attended for awhile or want to learn more about the new things on the schedule this year, come by this session, where IRE staff will explain how things work, what's changed from past conferences and how to get the most out of the next few days. We'll also give you a brief rundown of some of the resources IRE has to offer.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    8:30 am - 8:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Digging into data for stories: A crash course (pre-registration required)

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    Even if you’ve never touched a spreadsheet, you will walk away from this daylong workshop able to use Excel for your next investigation. You’ll come away with plenty of story ideas and also learn about publicly available databases that you can download and analyze to produce great local stories.

    In this workshop, led by experienced IRE and NICAR trainers, we'll explore how to use Excel, a fairly simple but powerful spreadsheet application, to begin analyzing data for stories. We'll start from the beginning with basic formulas and work our way up to summarizing information using pivot tables and more. How do you think about data analysis as a journalist? How do you find the story within the columns and rows? Depending on the experience level of the group we may discuss advanced functions in Excel including data cleaning and more. 

    We'll walk through a number of searchable databases currently available online and show you how you can download information into a spreadsheet so you can start analyzing data as soon as you leave the workshop.

    No previous experience is required for this workshop.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Computers will be provided for the training.

     

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Room 402

    9:00 am - 5:50 pm

  • Demo

    Analytics to find and grow your audience, from the reporter's perspective (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Rachael Delgado of Education Week; Benjamin Herold of Education Week

    Working journalists are increasingly responsible not just for reporting the news, but for making sure readers can find and engage with our work online and via social media. Newsrooms have more data than ever to help us fulfill these new responsibilities, and there has been a flourishing of new ideas and digital tools aimed at helping us better use that information. But a big disconnect remains. How can everyday reporters keep up with all the changes, without making ourselves miserable? Education Week staff writer Benjamin Herold and Director of Knowledge Services Rachael Delgado will share their process for using analytics to grow the readership of Ed Week's Digital Education blog by more than 90% - and produce smarter, more timely content in the process. 

     

    Franklin 7

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: What does the audience want?

    Speaker: Graeme Newell of 602 Communications

    How does your newsroom pick investigation topics? In most newsrooms, this important decision is based solely on the hunch of a reporter. Too often, this strategy leads to poor ratings when we create investigations that newsrooms love, but viewers hate. Viewer researcher Graeme Newell reveals the results of a comprehensive study. You’ll learn the topics and storytelling techniques that drive ratings. He’ll reveal the hopes, worries and frustrations that affect viewers the most and you’ll learn how to drive ratings by putting the viewers’ priorities at the center of your storytelling process.

    Franklin 9&10

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Campus coverage: Investigating off-campus housing, from slumlords to safety violations (Sponsored by Lumina Foundation)

    Speakers: Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV; Todd Wallack of The Boston Globe; Frank LoMonte of Brechner Center for Freedom of Information

    **Moderated by Frank LoMonte, Student Press Law Center

    Across the country, the vast majority of college students live in off-campus houses and apartments. These privately-owned residences sometimes put unsuspecting students at risk. Some are slumlords who don’t clear black mold or rats from their properties. Others are landlords who ignore occupancy rates to crowd as many rent-paying students into a single property as possible, creating fire traps. Some simply ignore the most basic safety measures like installing working smoke detectors.

     

    Franklin 5&6

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: The Census

    Speaker: Paul Overberg of The Wall Street Journal

    We’ll start with a typical journalistic frame: Post-recession, your community faces heavy social strain. How do you tell that story in new ways, accurately, in context, out through the ripples? We’ll work through critical prep, then how to get and interview the data. To get the most from this session, you should have some experience working with data in spreadsheets.

    Room 401

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    INN: Best practices in nonprofit news - The latest on how to fund your content

    Speakers: Lisa Williams of Institute for Nonprofit News; Joaquin Alvarado of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Anne Galloway of VTDigger.org; Richard Tofel of ProPublica

    **Moderated by Lisa Williams, Institute for Nonprofit News

    Leaders of large and small nonprofits share their successes and what truly has worked as they have built their organizations.

     

    Room 414-415

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Interactive data graphics in Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau) **pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Andrew Cheung of Tableau Software

    Learn how to create beautiful, interactive data visualizations on short deadlines. No programming required. You'll learn everything you need to build data visualizations and publish them to your website just like a video. We'll teach you how to:

    • *Connect to Excel files and other data
    • *Create maps and charts
    • *Make them interactive
    • *Publish them on your site

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. No previous experience with Tableau is necessary to take this class. Laptops will be provided.  This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class.  Limited seats are available.  

    This class is full. There may be a few seats available on-site. If you are interested, please arrive a few minutes before the class begins and the instructors will let you know how many seats may be available.

    Room 404

    9:00 am - 10:30 am

  • Panel

    Legal, technical, and policy challenges facing journalists: A primer and path forward

    Speakers: Hannah Bloch-Wehba of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press; Jennifer Henrichsen of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press; Sara Rafsky of Committee to Protect Journalists

    Mass state surveillance and digital security practices have been increasingly in the news since the Snowden revelations began in mid-2013, yet the legal, technical, and policy aspects of these revelations and their implications for journalists striving to protect their communications and their sources remains complex and convoluted.

    In this participatory session, legal and tech experts from the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press will paint the legal, policy, and technical landscape facing investigative journalists and editors today as they strive to carry out their jobs securely and responsibly. In particular, the session will focus on:

    • Tools and methods for protecting journalists beyond the new DOJ guidelines
    • Cutting-edge legal and policy implications of increasingly used surveillance technologies like police body cameras and dash cameras
    • Pros and cons of common digital security practices and methods
    • Realistic threat modeling and risk assessments for journalists and editors

    The session will be highly interactive and creatively leverage hypotheticals to engage the audience in a meaningful way. Questions and comments will be encouraged throughout the session and RCFP will adapt the presentation to reflect specific audience concerns. In addition, RCFP will point audience members to legal, tech, and policy resources that journalists and editors can take back to their newsrooms and share with their colleagues.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Merchants of mudslinging

    Speakers: Michael Beckel of Issue One; Julie Bykowicz of The Wall Street Journal; Robert Faturechi of ProPublica

    Here’s one prediction about the 2016 election that’s guaranteed to be true: There will be attack ads, lots of attack ads. Who is behind these ads, however, is not always clear. Panelists will offer tips on how to investigate any and all groups that pop up and start running political ads. They will also outline how to examine the consultants who are cashing in and making big bucks — regardless of their candidates winning or losing. Put these practices to use while covering any election, from dogcatcher to president.

     

    Salon L

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Reporting on the security state in your own community

    Speakers: Trevor Aaronson of The Intercept; Mark Hosenball of Reuters; Kate Martin of Carolina Public Press; Tara McKelvey of BBC News

    You don’t need to live in Washington, D.C., or New York City to report on national security. From local police using high-tech cell phone surveillance equipment to local counterterrorism task forces recruiting informants to military equipment in the hands of your local sheriff, this panel will provide story ideas and practical tips for you to begin reporting from your community on our growing security state.

     

    Salon K

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Thursday - #1)

    Speaker: Brad Stone of WSB-Atlanta

    **Moderated by Brad Stone, WSB-Atlanta

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Thursday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Wednesday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    The year in CAR

    Speakers: Megan Luther of InvestigateTV; Alex Richards of NerdWallet

    What were the big stories of the year? What were the most creative uses of data analysis? See what your colleagues have been up to and pick up some story ideas at the same time.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Interviews that work

    Speakers: Wendy Halloran of WSB-Atlanta; Tony Kovaleski of KMGH-Denver; Noah Pransky of WTSP-Tampa Bay

    This panel is a deep dive into the art of the interview, taking you inside the process from preparation to execution. In addition to hearing what works (and what doesn’t), you will leave with the top ten tips from experienced broadcasters who have been conducting both scheduled and unscheduled interviews for decades. Panelists will answer specific questions to help you expose the truth, manage “talking points,” get decision-makers in the hot seat and avoid PIO interviews.

    Franklin 9&10

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Covering policing, from shootings to community relations (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)

    Speakers: William Freivogel of St. Louis Public Radio; Coulter Jones of The Wall Street Journal; Jeremy Kohler of St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Robert O'Harrow of The Washington Post; Nancy Phillips of The Philadelphia Inquirer

    **Moderated by Nancy Phillips, The Philadelphia Inquirer

    Journalists are paying much more attention to a broad range of policing tactics around the U.S. after the controversial police shooting last summer in Ferguson, Mo. Two reporters who covered Ferguson and its aftermath will speak, along with a journalist who investigated the lack of reliable data on police shootings and a reporter who has documented police seizures of billions of dollars worth of cars, cash, and other property without warrants or convictions.

    Franklin 1&2

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Demo

    Getting data from the web: From the quick grab to the intricate scrape (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Samantha Sunne of independent journalist; Matt Wynn of USA TODAY Network

    Grabbing data and information down off the web is a skill any reporter can use, so come learn to do it with point-and-click tools, web tricks and even writing your own scripts. We'll go over ready-to-use scrapers like import.io, Python libraries like BeautifulSoup (or whatever) and the mechanisms that allow these scrapers work. This session is for those who know what web scrapers are but not how to use them - or even who don't know what web scrapers are.

     

    Franklin 7

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    How to sort out science for your investigation

    Speakers: Jeff Donn of The Associated Press; Jon Kamp of The Wall Street Journal; Kendall Taggart of BuzzFeed News; Ellen Gabler of The New York Times

    **Moderated by Ellen Gabler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Learn how to decode complex, scientific issues, medical terminology and other brain-busting topics that seem to require a PhD to understand.  (You don't need one.) We'll share strategies on understanding difficult documents, when to enlist the help of experts or hire help, and how to work with sources so you know you are getting it right.

     

    Salon K

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    INN: Mergers, acquisitions and memos of understanding

    Speakers: Joe Bergantino of Boston University; Margaret Freivogel of St. Louis Public Radio; Andy Hall of Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism; Lorie Hearn of inewsource; Laura Frank of Rocky Mountain PBS

    **Moderated by Laura Frank, Rocky Mountain PBS

    With collaboration and partnerships a fundamental part of INN members operations, this session will offer guidance on business arrangements with universities and partners and tips on how to do a successful merger.

     

    Room 414-415

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Hands-on

    Make Photoshop work for you

    Speaker: Lena Groeger of ProPublica

    Ever want to create an animated gif? How about a easy way to crop, rotate and resize 1,000 photos at once? Or extract hidden information from a photograph using the perspective tool? You'll learn these tricks and more in a hands-on workshop aimed at showing you the amazing (and extremely useful) things that Photoshop can do for you.

     

    Room 401

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    On The beat: Business (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Brian Fechtel of Breadwinners' Insurance; Cary Spivak of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Jason Zweig of The Wall Street Journal; Daniel Gilbert of The Seattle Times

    **Moderated by Daniel Gilbert, The Wall Street Journal

    Imagine a prominent credit counselor who secretly profits from payday lending. Investors who buy foreclosed houses and stick former owners with the tax bill. Life insurers that fail to disclose the actual costs of their policies. Regulators who fail to notice all of the above. They are real. We’ll tell you how we found them and where to go digging in nonprofit, corporate, real estate and other state and federal records.

     

    Franklin 5&6

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Thursday - #2)

    Speaker: Anzio Williams of NBC10 Philadelphia

    **Moderated by Anzio Williams, WCAU-Philadelphia

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Thursday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Wednesday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    The right to photograph & record in public: On the ground & in the air

    Speaker: Mickey Osterreicher of National Press Photographers Association

    Ever since 911 there has been a heightened awareness of anyone taking pictures or recording events in public. This issue has only been exacerbated by the widespread proliferation of cellphone cameras and the ability of everyone to post photos and recordings on the Internet, where they may be viewed and shared. Video recordings of police have played an integral role in many recent news stories, but questions still remain about the rights of citizens and journalists to photograph and record in public. This session will examine constitutional issues, search and seizure, exigent circumstances, and qualified immunity as well as provide practical advice regarding the best ways to handle these situations. There will also be discussion of privacy concerns, police bodycams and the latest legal updates on use of drones for newsgathering.

     

    Salon L

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    What the hell is R and all the other questions you're afraid to ask

    Speakers: Tisha Thompson of ESPN; Sisi Wei of ProPublica

    Ever wondered what all those programming and computer-assisted reporting terms mean?  What is R and why you would want to use it? What is the difference between Ruby, Python and Javascript? Why are there so many terms with the letters J and SQL?  Welcome to our no-judgment-starting-at-zero session even vets learn from. We'll review tech concepts and jargon you'll likely hear at the conference this year, explain what they mean, why they're useful and point you to the sessions that can teach you how to use the terms you now understand.

    This session is good for: Anyone who has felt (even remotely) lost in the sea of technical terminology.

    Franklin 3&4

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Hands-on

    Advanced design and interaction in Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau) **pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Dash Davidson of Tableau Software

    Analyzing data and coming up interactive visualizations is easy in Tableau but sometimes getting everything looking polished isn’t. In this session you will learn how to break away from the default formatting in Tableau Public to create interactive data graphics that match your style guides and engage your readers. 

    We will teach you how to:

    • *change colors, shapes, borders, fonts, and other basic formatting
    • *incorporate images, logos, and other graphic elements
    • *take advantage of advanced interaction techniques to incorporate multimedia
    • *utilize design and layout best practices to make sure that your visualization looks polished and professional

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. Some familiarity with the product is recommended; a beginner session earlier in the day should prepare you enough for this session. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class.  Limited seats are available. 

    This class is full. There may be a few seats available on-site. If you are interested, please arrive a few minutes before the class begins and the instructors will let you know how many seats may be available. 

    Room 404

    11:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    A conversation with Seymour Hersh

    Speakers: Seymour Hersh of independent journalist; Leonard Downie of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    **Moderated by Leonard Downie, Jr., ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    From Mai Lai and Watergate to Osama Bin Laden, singular investigative journalist Seymour Hersh discusses his work.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Campus coverage: Key data for investigating college sports (Sponsored by Lumina Foundation)

    Speakers: Dan Bauman of The Chronicle of Higher Education; Steve Berkowitz of USA TODAY Network; Paula Lavigne of ESPN; Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV

    **Moderated by Jill Riepenhoff, The Columbus Dispatch

    It’s one of the most under-investigated departments on many campuses yet the most visible and ripe for scrutiny. This panel will show you where and how to dig. Cover a private school where public records rarely exist? Find out where to find them because there’s almost always a paper trail.

     

    Salon L

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Consumer investigations

    Speakers: Jim Donovan of KYW/CBS3 Philadelphia; Cindy Galli of ABC News; Randy Mac of NBC4 Los Angeles

    It’s the news everyone can use. Consumer investigations give your viewers and readers high value when we take special interest in their safety and their wallets. So how do we make them unique? This panel will take you through best practices to organize, wade through and advance consumer investigations. We’ll talk laws, finding sources, and backgrounding and approaching businesses. Plenty of links and story ideas, too.

     

    Franklin 9&10

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Hands-on

    Designing database applications to increase page views and ad revenues

    Speaker: Edward Garcia of Caspio, Inc.

    With journalists facing increasing pressure to create data interactives that engage more readers, it’s important to optimize data-driven applications for interactivity, traffic and page views. Learn how to design and deploy revenue-generating applications that will continue to serve as long-lasting data assets. This demo will showcase real-world examples and techniques for building “share-worthy” hyper-local applications. Technologies covered: Caspio, Google maps, GPS and location proximity, AJAX, CDN, data feeds, SEO, and cross-channel deployment (web, mobile and social).

    NOTE: Pre-registration is not required, but is recommended to receive your free Caspio account pre-loaded with demo apps for the session.

    Click here to sign up.

    **This session is good for: Everyone. All attendees receive a free permanent Caspio account for life.

    Room 401

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    INN: The latest on foundations and grants

    Speakers: Sue Hale of Oklahoma Watch; Charles Lewis of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Irma Simpson of Institute for Nonprofit News; Brant Houston of University of Illinois

    **Moderated by Brant Houston, University of Illinois

    This session will discuss recent trends in foundation funding of nonprofit investigative newsrooms. Panelists will share tips and principles on how to find foundations that will support a newsroom's work and how to write successful grant applications.

    Room 414-415

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Demo

    Mobile ready visualizations with Silk (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Alex Salkever of Silk.co

    Silk is an all-purpose tool for data journalism that lets anyone convert spreadsheets into an online database and data visualizations in minutes. In this demo session, we'll pull data about 2015 killings by the police in California, aggregated from Facebook, and turn it into maps, charts, and interactive tables. Then, we'll upload data from the 500 most successful Kickstarter technology projects in 2014, do some quick visual analysis, save and publish visualizations.

     

    Franklin 7

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: Criminal justice

    Speakers: Kelvyn Anderson of Philadelphia Police Advisory Commission; Alec Klein of The Medill Justice Project; Cheryl W. Thompson of NPR; John Sullivan of The Washington Post

    **Moderated by John Sullivan, The Washington Post

    There are plenty of investigative stories to be uncovered in the area of criminal justice, from law enforcement to the court system. This panel will provide tips and strategies on how to find those stories in a variety of areas and how to dig beyond breaking news and day-to-day coverage to find the bigger picture.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Thursday - #3)

    Speaker: Patti Dennis of TEGNA Inc.

    **Moderated by Patti Dennis, KUSA/9News Denver

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Thursday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Wednesday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    The year in investigative reporting

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Mark Horvit of University of Missouri

    Pick up some story ideas and be inspired with the highlights of some of the year's best investigations.

     

    Salon K

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Uncovering fraud and malfeasance

    Speakers: Angela Couloumbis of The Philadelphia Inquirer; Craig McCoy of The Philadelphia Inquirer; Michael LaForgia of The New York Times; David Cay Johnston of DCReport; Susan Carroll of Houston Chronicle

    **Moderated by David Cay Johnston, Newsweek

    Michael Laforgia explored how government re-victimized the homeless. Brooks Williams chronicled the overreach of prosecutors. Angela Couloumbis and Craig McCoy shed light on a state attorney general who killed cases and subpoenas. Learn how to use smarts and patience, and interviews and documents to get past official obfuscation and lies – and then tell stories that will be as easy to read as they were hard to report.

     

    Franklin 5&6

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Room 414-415

    12:30 pm - 2:20 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to data stories in Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau) **pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Ben Jones of Tableau Software

    Got a dataset and an impending deadline to write a story on it? Find the scoop and convey it with beautiful, interactive visualizations in a serial narrative using Tableau Public. It’s a fast, easy to use, and free tool for journalists. Visualizations will publish using any CMS and no programming is required. 

    We’ll teach you how to:

    • *Think about narrative data visualization
    • *Rapidly explore and analyze datasets with ease
    • *Make eye-catching visualizations to share your findings
    • *Add interactivity and arrange them in a serial narrative to engage and sustain your audience’s attention

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. No previous experience with Tableau is necessary to take this class. Laptops will be provided.  This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class.  Limited seats are available.  

    This class is full. There may be a few seats available on-site. If you are interested, please arrive a few minutes before the class begins and the instructors will let you know how many seats may be available.

    Room 404

    1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

  • IRE Board of Directors Meeting

    IRE Board Meeting

    The IRE Board of Directors will meet at 2 p.m. Thursday in Philadelphia as part of the annual conference.  The meeting is open to all IRE members.

    Conference Suite III

    2:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Coding for journalists (pre-registration required)

    Speaker: Alex Richards of NerdWallet

    This half-day session will cover the ways basic programming in Python can collect data for stories from the web, assist with repetitive tasks and speed your reporting. The workshop will cover the fundamental coding concepts and libraries you need to know about, as well as how to apply them to your own stories. 

    This course is designed for beginners who already have some experience with spreadsheets, SQL, the command line and basic HTML. Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Room 401

    2:30 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast deep dives 1

    Speakers: Brian Collister of Investigative Network; Harry Hairston of NBC10 Philadelphia; Russ Ptacek of independent journalist

    From undercover and interview techniques to research and records requests, watch some of the best investigative stories of the year and hear from the journalists behind the work.

     

    Franklin 8

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Covering police shootings in ethnic communities (Sponsored by New America Media)

    Speakers: Sabrina Vourvoulias of AL DÍA News; Anthony Advincula of New America Media; D. Kevin McNeir of The Washington Informer; Rong Xiaoqing of Sing Tao Daily; Linn Washington of Temple University

    **Moderated by Anthony Advincula, New America Media

    Reporters and editors working for ethnic media will talk about their own experiences covering recent police shootings that sparked a spate of unrests in different parts of the country. This panel will look at how they approach these racially and politically sensitive issues through their own perspectives and what they learned from their reporting. How did the Chinese community react after a Chinese-American police officer was convicted of shooting an unarmed black man in New York City? How did the Latino publications cover the police shooting death of a Mexican farm worker in Washington? And, is there a double standard in black media coverage of police shootings?

     

    Salon K

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Engaging your audience

    Speakers: Jim Brady of Billy Penn; Jodi Gersh of Gannett Company, Inc.; Terry Parris Jr. of ProPublica; Jennifer Preston of Knight Foundation

    **Moderated by Jennifer Preston, Knight Foundation

    Your readers are up for grabs in a way they've never been before. There are thousands of news sites -- not to mention Google, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Netflix and others -- competing for their time. How well news organizations engage and involve the community will go a long way toward determining its traffic, its impact and its fate. Hear how organizations big and small, legacy and startup, profit and non-profit are addressing engagement.

     

    Salon L

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    From facts to data: Making your stories airtight

    Speakers: Alleen Brown of The Intercept; David Donald of Investigative Reporting Workshop-American University; Shawn McIntosh of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    **Moderated by Shawn McIntosh, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Tips and techniques to improve accuracy, reduce legal risk and keep your credibility intact as you tackle complex investigative stories. The session will include tips for making meaning out of data while keeping your facts straight and staying safe from all-too-common data journalism pitfalls.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    INN: Legal really matters - Expert advice and listening to what members need

    Speakers: Jeff Hermes of Media Law Resource Center; Katie Townsend of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press; Denise Malan of IRE and NICAR

    **Moderated by Denise Malan, INN/IRE

    Townsend and Hermes give tips on FOI requests, getting pro bono representation, and making sure you have necessary legal protections.

     

    Room 414-415

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Management track: Managing the multiplatform investigation

    Speakers: Lawan Hamilton of Scripps Washington Bureau; Lorie Hearn of inewsource; Robert Salladay of McClatchy; Peter Bale of The Center for Public Integrity

    **Moderated by Peter Bale, The Center for Public Integrity

    Producing a great project means that it in addition to strong reporting, the story can be told in a variety of ways, taking advantage of a multitude of options. Video, audio, interactive data presentations, apps -- the options are dizzying and daunting. This session looks at ways to juggle all the pieces of a multiplatform project and how to decide what to deploy.

     

    Franklin 5&6

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Demo

    Pop Up Archive: Helping Google (and new audiences) find audio (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Bailey Smith of Pop Up Archive; Anne Wootton of Pop Up Archive

    The audience for audio is growing: audio offers a level of engagement unmatched by text, images, or even video. Journalists are better poised now than ever before to reach audiences when they’re driving, exercising, or doing the dishes. In this session, Pop Up Archive will share some lessons we've learned about making audio discoverable on the web. We’ll cover topics like the scaling power of machine transcripts, how search engines find audio, and the challenges of sharing sound. Pop Up Archive uses speech-to-text software trained specifically for news media to process thousands of hours of sound from all over the web. Our goal is to speed up production workflows and help audiences discover and share spoken word audio quickly and reliably.

     

    Franklin 7

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Privatizing government services (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Blake Ellis of CNN; Melanie Hicken of CNN; Carol Marbin Miller of Miami Herald; Pat Beall of The Palm Beach Post; Pratap Chatterjee of CorpWatch

    **Moderated by Pat Beall, The Palm Beach Post

    Hailed as an alternative to pricey bureaucracy, putting public services into the hands of private companies is more popular than ever. Businesses now handle everything from foster care to court fine collections to prisons to the infrastructure of war. But taxpayer savings can be hit or miss, political cronyism is thriving and in some cases, privatization has led to abuse and death. In this session, reporters talk about the role of political influence in oversight, the ins and outs of contract math, “trade secret” exemptions to public records laws and uncovering patterns of abuses.

     

    Franklin 9&10

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Red flags: Finding fraud in government programs

    Speakers: John Sopko of The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR); Danielle Brian of Project On Government Oversight

    **Moderated by Danielle Brian, Project On Government Oversight

    Learn about how to track down instances of fraud from an expert -- the special inspector general for Afghanistan reconstruction, John Sopko. The former mob prosecutor will talk about how to find examples of waste and mismanagement, how officials like him can work with journalists and the vital role investigative work plays when billions of government dollars are at stake.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Data discovery: Finding stories in data (Hosted by Tableau) **pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Jewel Loree of Tableau Software

    Learn how to use Tableau to dive deeper into your data and ask powerful questions. How do you go about finding stories in data? How do you find data to support your stories? To help answer these questions, we will embark upon a data discovery journey, teasing narrative stories out of data.

    We’ll learn how to:

    • *Strategically approach large datasets
    • *Use Tableau to facilitate data discovery
    • *Use data to support narrative stories
    • *Basic narrative presentation elements

    Some experience with Tableau Public is recommended. Taking one of the earlier Tableau sessions should suffice. Laptops will be provided.  This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class.  Limited seats are available.  

    This class is full. There may be a few seats available on-site. If you are interested, please arrive a few minutes before the class begins and the instructors will let you know how many seats may be available. 

    Room 404

    3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Panel

    50 Apps in 30 Minutes (plus 30 minutes of other cool mobile stuff)

    Speaker: David Ho of The Wall Street Journal

    Supercharge your smartphone for reporting! Can't stand the idea of being without your phone? Then you can't be without this session. WSJ's executive mobile editor will help you turn your phone into a Swiss Army Knife of journalism goodness with this always-updating and fun session on apps and tools for gathering and producing news. Want to use your phone to record interviews? Take better notes? Transcribe audio? Edit video? Track Tweets? Talk on camera? ID airplanes? Translate Swahili? There's an app for that. Plus, learn about more tips, tricks and mobile gear. The mobile age is here. You should be here, too.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Congressional oversight and investigations: What investigative reporters need to know about how things work on Capitol Hill

    Speakers: Jim McGee of ----0000 Institution Not Present 0000----; Robert O'Harrow of The Washington Post; Ed Pound of independent journalist

    For investigative reporters, Congress can be a mother lode of leads, the starting point for award-winning journalism, and the source of hearings and reports that respond to their disclosures. Mining journalistic gold on Capital Hill requires a basic knowledge of the fragmented system of committees and agencies that support the work of committees, and understanding how congressional investigators operate.Two journalist who excel at this task, Edward T. Pound, a veteran investigative reporter and editor based in Washington, D. C., and Robert O’Harrow of the Washington Post, will discuss how they leveraged their knowledge of the work of congressional committees to develop sources, obtain singular information, and develop groundbreaking stories. Jim McGee, a former investigative reporter for the Miami Herald and the Washington Post who spent nine years as an investigator on committees in the House and Senate, will take you inside two major oversight investigations, including the Senate’s review of the federal government's flawed response to Hurricane Katrina.He’ll discuss some of the information-gathering strategies and tactics he has used to overcome efforts by agencies or corporations to prevent committees from gaining timely access to documents and technical data, and explain the role that congressional investigators play in pursuing the “long game” of overseeing federal programs and procurements. He’ll provide a primer on the structure and mechanics of the oversight and investigations process with tips on how reporters outside Washington D. C can access and use information and reports generated by the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the Congressional Research Service (CRS), Inspector Generals (IG), and the work of appropriations and authorization committees.  

    Salon K

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Game on: Creating interactive experiences from investigations

    Speakers: Adam Auriemma of Fusion; Asi Burak of Games for Change; Mitch Gelman of Gannett Digital; Jennifer Forsyth of The Wall Street Journal

    **Moderated by Jennifer Forsyth, The Wall Street Journal

    The way newsrooms tell stories is changing, with many of them using virtual reality and video gaming techniques to find new audiences or enhance the experience of dedicated ones. This panel will discuss ways that VR and gaming can be used in serious journalism, exploring the benefits, the obstacles and the mistakes to avoid.

     

    Franklin 5&6

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    INN: Workshops (choose one): Measuring metrics; Do's and don'ts of grant writing; Technology innovation; Creative Marketing

    Speakers: Lauren Fuhrmann of Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism; Adam Schweigert of Institute for Nonprofit News; Irma Simpson of Institute for Nonprofit News

    -Measuring metrics: What really tells the story of your audience and impact
    A discussion of the many different ways to measure impact both qualitatively and quantitatively.

    -Do's and don'ts of grant writing
    Irma Simpson details practical tips for grant writing and dissects a successful proposal

    -Technology innovation
    Adam Schweigert leads discussion about INN's technology strategy, specifically tools, training and documentation, and what members want from INN

    -Creative Marketing
    You've done a branding campaign, but once the money for that is gone, what's next? Beyond membership campaigns and events, how do we attract more readers?

     

    Room 414-415

    3:40 pm - 4:50 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating child & family issues (Sponsored by Temple University School of Media and Communication)

    Speakers: Alex Campbell of BuzzFeed News; Karen de Sa of San Francisco Chronicle; Marisa Kwiatkowski of The Indianapolis Star; Jenifer McKim of New England Center for Investigative Reporting

    **Moderated by Jenifer McKim, New England Center for Investigative Reporting

    From investigating domestic violence and the courts to overdrugging foster youth and covering mental illness there's a vast space for digging into stories related to the wellbeing of children and families in America. Award-winning reporters discuss their latest compelling projects and provide tips on how to find and fight for data and documents that break important stories in the social issues realm.

     

    Salon L

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Meet the first intelligence whistleblowers and the journalist who revealed their secrets

    Speakers: Keith Forsyth of Citizens' Commission to Investigate the FBI; Johanna Hamilton of Maximum Pictures; Betty Medsger of independent journalist; Bonnie Raines of early childhood specialist; John Raines of Temple University; James B. Steele of independent journalist

    **Moderated by James Steele, Vanity Fair

    Before Daniel Ellsberg, Edward Snowden, Chelsea Manning and Wikileaks, there was the Citizens Commission to Investigate the FBI.

    In March 1971, eight citizens broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, took hundreds of secret files and shared them with the public. The files revealed massive political surveillance by the FBI against activists in the civil rights movement, the antiwar movement and every movement for rights, including the women’s and gay rights movements.

    Despite an intense five-year search for the burglars, the group was never found. Most of them revealed their identities for the first time in Betty Medsger’s 2014 book, The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI and in filmmaker Johanna Hamilton’s documentary film, 1971.

    Three of the burglars will participate in a panel discussion with Medsger, a former Washington Post reporter who was one of the five recipients of the FBI files initially distributed by the Media burglars, and Hamilton.

    There also will be a free screening of Hamilton’s documentary, 1971, at 7 p.m. on June 4.

    Franklin 3&4

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Thursday - #4)

    Speaker: Tom Dolan of Dolan Media Management

    **Moderated by Tom Dolan, Dolan Media Management

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Thursday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Wednesday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Demo

    Tell stories about your community with real estate data (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Skylar Olsen of Zillow

    Housing data is about more than just real estate. Get beyond the market reports and tell stories about your community: Watchdog government programs, profile up-and-coming neighborhoods, and inform your daily reports on transit, crime, and new development.

    In this session, Zillow's senior economist, Skylar Olsen, will walk you through the data available about real estate, explain its caveats and show off her favorite tricky Excel shortcuts. She'll demo how she combines housing stats with census data to find trends relevant in local markets all over the country.

     

    Franklin 7

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    The ethics of sourcing

    Speakers: Margaret Sullivan of The Washington Post; Aidan White of Ethical Journalism Network; David Boardman of Temple University; Wendy Ruderman of Philadelphia Daily News

    **Moderated by David Boardman, Temple University

    Using and identifying sensitive sources in investigative reporting has always been a tricky balancing act. But never has it been as challenging as it is today -- with the added pressures of a 24/7 news cycle, intense competition on social media and ever-changing expectations from both the public and the sources themselves. Explore these and other ethical issues concerning sourcing, with a panel that includes Pulitzer winners, an ethicist and the renowned public editor of The New York Times.

     

    Franklin 9&10

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Access to your information: Subpoenas, shield laws and more

    Speakers: Amy Ginensky of Pepper Hamilton LLP; Gregg Leslie of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press; Mickey Osterreicher of National Press Photographers Association; Maud Beelman of The Associated Press

    **Moderated by Maud Beelman, The Associated Press

    A panel of First Amendment attorneys guide you through the legal maze of protecting your sources and your journalism from subpoenas, court order threats and worse.

    Franklin 3&4

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Demo

    Banjo: Report the news first (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Stacey Epstein of Banjo

    In today’s world, events are captured by over 7 billion cell phones. Combine mobile access with social sharing and everyone becomes a reporter. Nearly every story is reported first by social media users. Banjo alerts you to these stories, but when breaking news happens, an alert is not enough. Banjo gives you the fastest way to get “eyes on the ground.” We show you everything that is happening from the people who are actually there, in real time, across all social networks. You’ll be reporting the news as it unfolds with eyewitness sources. With Banjo, you’ll turn signals into stories and get news out before anyone else.

    Banjo seamlessly integrates into existing systems, like digital touch screens, Chyron, and Vizrt. From breaking news alerts to content for broadcast and digital, see how Banjo's complete solution gives you an advantage for the stories you want to tell.

    Franklin 7

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Best of broadcast

    Speaker: Tisha Thompson of ESPN

    Watch and listen as the photographers, editors and producers behind this year’s IRE Award winners and finalists explain how they did it, what they would do differently and what they were really thinking when things got hard.

     

    Franklin 9&10

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Management track: Guiding and editing the in-depth story

    Speakers: Dwayne Bray of ESPN; Brent Walth of University of Oregon; Gordon Witkin of The Center for Public Integrity; Greg Borowski of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    **Moderated by Greg Borowski, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    For a project to reach its full potential, dozens of things have to go right. An experienced group of projects editors examines what is needed to build a successful investigation -- from vetting ideas to building teams, framing stories to rock-solid fact-checking, devising a social media push to developing a follow up plan.

     

    Salon K

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: Government

    Speakers: Anita Hofschneider of Honolulu Civil Beat; Challen Stephens of Alabama Media Group; Terri Langford of independent journalist; Brett Blackledge of Naples Daily News

    **Moderated by Terri Langford, The Texas Tribune

    Learn how to cut through the tiresome meetings, and bureaucratic jargon and walk away with fantastic stories that have readers asking for more. 

     

    Salon L

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Power couple: Data-driven reporting and people-driven narrative

    Speakers: Audra Burch of Miami Herald; Michael Sallah of USA TODAY Network; Steven Rich of The Washington Post; Deborah Nelson of University of Maryland; Carol Marbin Miller of Miami Herald

    **Moderated by Deborah Nelson, University of Maryland

    How to transform data analysis into data storytelling. This panel will cover reporting, writing and visual techniques for marrying the power of narrative with the power of numbers.

     

    Franklin 5&6

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Thursday - #5)

    Speaker: Steve Eckert of KARE 11 Minneapolis/St. Paul

    **Moderated by Steve Eckert, KARE 11 Minneapolis/St. Paul

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Thursday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Wednesday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Tools for small newsrooms that don't code

    Speakers: Alexandra Kanik of Louisville Public Media; Alex Salkever of Silk.co; Grant Smith of Reuters; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    **Moderated by Megan Luther, IRE/NICAR

    No programmer. No problem. We will show you free or inexpensive options for scraping, cleaning, data viz and database management.  

     

    Franklin 1&2

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Room 414-415

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Reception

    Welcome reception (Co-Sponsored by Pepper Hamilton LLP and Calkins Media)

    Kick off the conference with a welcome reception on Thursday night beginning at 6 p.m. Meet up with friends you have not seen since last year and welcome new attendees. Each attendee will receive one drink ticket for beer, wine, soda or bottled water.

    See printed schedule for room information

    6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Conference Registration (Friday)

    Registration will be located on the 4th floor of the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. 

    Franklin Hall Foyer

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Friday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.  Sales will be located on the 4th floor of the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown.

    Franklin Hall Foyer

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Mapping mini camp (pre-registration required)

    Speakers: David Herzog of IRE and NICAR; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Brian Peterson of Esri

    Learn how to uncover interesting news stories by mapping data with geographic information system (GIS) software during our intensive mini-boot camp and receive a free copy of ArcGIS Desktop*. 

    Experienced IRE/NICAR and Esri trainers conduct this hands-on training using the latest version of ArcGIS. We will look at noteworthy stories that have used mapping and show you how to uncover stories using census and other data. You'll learn how to display data geographically; import and query data; geocode to merge databases with addresses into maps. Attendees will also learn how ArcGIS Online may help as a storytelling platform. In addition, we'll provide you with our boot camp materials to help keep you on track long after you leave the conference.  

    Participants should have basic knowledge in using relational database programs such as Microsoft Access. Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Computers will be provided for the training.

    *Attendees of the bootcamp have the option to receive the following discounts from Esri. (1) A free license of ArcGIS Desktop that will not time out and includes one year call-in technical support and upgrades at no cost. Call-in technical support and upgrades are available on a nominal fee basis in year two. (2) A free one-year subscription to ArcGIS Online that includes access to Esri's Community Analyst database. Please contact the Esri Media Relations team [email protected] further information. (Please note that ArcGIS Desktop will only work on a Windows environment.)

     

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Room 402

    9:00 am - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Investigative reporting at networks

    Speakers: Josh Mankiewicz of Dateline; Ira Rosen of 60 Minutes; Rhonda Schwartz of Brian Ross Investigates; Lea Thompson of independent journalist

    **Moderated by Lea Thompson, LT Productions

    What are the stories that matter for network TV and how do you go about getting them? 

     

    Franklin 9&10

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Cleaning up data with OpenRefine

    Speaker: Kate Golden of The Walkley Foundation

    Learn to take filthy, stinking, messy data from an unhelpful government agency and transform it into something useful with the help of OpenRefine. If you often have to scrub and standardize huge spreadsheets, but you haven't delved into regular expressions, this program will change your life.

    This session will be most useful if: You have some experience working with data in columns and rows, in spreadsheets or database managers.

    Room 404

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Excel 1: Getting started with spreadsheets

    Speaker: Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV

    In this introduction to spreadsheets you'll begin analyzing data with Excel, a simple but powerful tool. You'll learn how to enter data, sort it, filter it and conduct simple calculations like sum, average and median.

     

    Room 401

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Geolocation for investigations

    Speakers: Jack Gillum of ProPublica; Jan Gunnar Furuly of Aftenposten; Stacey Epstein of Banjo

    New tools are harnessing social media feeds and allowing you to tap into conversations around the world. In this panel, we'll look at specific tools like Banjo, Creepy and Instagram's API. We'll show examples of how geo-location tools are being used for investigations by The Associated Press and Aftenposten in Norway and show why geolocation can help your find sources faster so you can beef-up your coverage during breaking news.

    Salon E

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    How to buy a candidate (Sponsored by Rockefeller Brothers Fund)

    Speakers: Bill Allison of Foreign Policy; Edwin Bender of National Institute on Money in State Politics; Russ Choma of Mother Jones; Michael Beckel of Issue One

    **Moderated by Michael Beckel, The Center for Public Integrity

    More money than ever before is expected to pour into the 2016 election, from the White House on down the ballot. In a post-Citizens United world, donors have a plethora of options at their disposal to boost their preferred politicos — including the official campaign committees, the party committees, super PACs and “dark money” groups. Panelists will outline the key differences between each of these fundraising vehicles. They will also show off tools such as FEC.gov, OpenSecrets.org and other useful websites that can help you see where all this money is coming from.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Investigating economic development subsidies: Missing jobs, strained budgets and tense politics (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Alejandra Cancino of Better Government Association; Gordon Russell of The Advocate; Lee Zurik of WVUE-New Orleans; Greg LeRoy of Good Jobs First

    **Moderated by Greg LeRoy, Good Jobs First

    States and localities spend >$70 billion per year to attract and retain businesses – sometimes at hundreds of thousands of dollars per job – yet many deals fail to deliver. Economic development subsidies are often arcane and opaque, and the number and cost of high-profile “megadeals” (like Boeing and Tesla) have mushroomed. The costs are straining state budgets and becoming political hot potatoes in many states. Learn from three aggressive investigators from Louisiana and Illinois and a non-profit resource center dedicated to such research.

     

    Salon C

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Investigating migration and immigration (Sponsored by Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma)

    Speakers: Melissa del Bosque of The Investigative Fund; Carlos Eduardo Huertas of CONNECTAS; Sarah Stillman of The New Yorker; Bruce Shapiro of Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma

    **Moderated by Bruce Shapiro, Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma

    Immigration and migration are by their nature cross-border stories. This panel will explore the challenges of developing sources and stories across the Americas, and among groups often overlooked by reporters.

     

    Franklin 5&6

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Management track: Managing the multi-newsroom project

    Speakers: John Kelly of USA TODAY Network; Marina Walker Guevara of The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Richard Pienciak of The Associated Press; Ellen Weiss of Scripps Washington Bureau

    **Moderated by Ellen Weiss, Scripps Washington Bureau

    It's tough enough putting all the pieces together for an investigative project done by one newsroom. When bringing together staff from multiple organizations, the challenges multiply quickly. This session looks at ways to create channels of communication, balance the needs of different constituencies and stay organized amid the chaos, whether the newsrooms are within one organization, one country, or spanning the globe.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Friday - #1)

    Speaker: Charlotte Huffman of WFAA-Dallas/Fort Worth

    **Moderated by Charlotte Huffman, KYW/CBS3 Philadelphia

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Friday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. Thursday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    The other half of the story: How reporters can use data to identify 'positive deviants' and add fresh angles to investigative stories

    Speakers: Greg Borowski of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; David Bornstein of Solutions Journalism Network; Tina Rosenberg of Solutions Journalism Network; Claudia Rowe of The Seattle Times

    Journalists normally use data to identify bad actors. But it's also worth looking at the positive deviants -  those who are getting better than expected outcomes. Looking at how they got those results takes away the excuses of the poor performers and can make investigations into wrongdoing more powerful. The panelists are journalists or editors who will explain how they have used this approach to strengthen or reframe investigations. 

     

    Salon D

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    Wedgies: Social polling (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Porter Haney of wedgies.com

    Polls are a great way to interact with readers and collect structured feedback in real time, eliminating the unorganized chaos of comments. In this session we'll explore how journalists and editors leverage polls to collect data from readers and leverage it for content, stories, and breaking news.

     

    Franklin 7

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Backgrounding on deadline

    Speakers: Kate Martin of Carolina Public Press; James Neff of The Philadelphia Inquirer

    Someone is suddenly swept into a news event: a train crash, a natural disaster, a police shooting. Who is s/he? What’s their story? Find out what websites and other resources you should use to quickly unveil this person's past and present -- whether you have only 15 minutes, an hour, a day or the luxury of a week. Find undiscovered social-media accounts and court records, and learn new search-engine tricks, all on the cheap.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Beyond Ferguson: Investigating schools, police and inequality (Sponsored by Temple University School of Media and Communication)

    Speakers: Nikole Hannah-Jones of The New York Times Magazine; Kimbriell Kelly of The Washington Post; Frances Robles of The New York Times

    The protests in Ferguson and Baltimore laid bare America's racial divide, forcing newsrooms across the country to dedicate significant resources to covering America's oldest problem: Race.

    Still, we often write about race as a subject, rather than racial inequities as a thread through everyday life. What tools can provide more in-depth coverage about racial inequality, school segregation, housing and policing? We’ll discuss past coverage and provide tools for investigating the racial divide.

    Find out how The Washington Post answered the unspoken questions about police shootings: were the officers white and victims black? Do officers get charged for killing people? Learn what resources are available to dig deeper into how the economic recovery in housing differed for people of different races. Get tips for examining school segregation, local enforcement of fair housing laws and police use of lethal force.

    In this session you’ll hear from three reporters who have cut through the rhetoric on race to address hot-button issues.

    Salon D

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: How to get people to talk

    Speakers: Scott Friedman of KXAS/NBC5 Dallas-Fort Worth; Keli Rabon of independent journalist; Scott Zamost of CNBC

    Whether it's a top official at the FBI or IRS, the Mormon Church or an accused sex offender, there are proven methods to persuade people to go on camera. We'll reveal the secrets behind landing the interview that no one thought would happen. 

     

    Franklin 9&10

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Hands-on

    Excel 2: Functions and pivot tables

    Speaker: Andrew Lehren of NBC News

    In this class you'll learn how to use formulas to analyze data with the eye of a journalist using calculations like change, percent change and rates. It will also focus on the power of pivot tables for analysis in minutes rather than hours.

     

    Room 401

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Freelance reporting with impact: How stories get attention, and results (Sponsored by Fund for Investigative Journalism)

    Speakers: Isaiah Thompson of WGBH News; Hella Winston of Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism; Maria Zamudio of APM Reports; Sandra Bartlett of independent journalist

    **Moderated by Sandra Bartlett, independent journalist

    This panel of freelance and independent media journalists — whose work has sparked significant impact — will share the secrets of their success. Learn how they generated traction on the issues they exposed and how they produced award-winning stories that got results.

     

    Franklin 5&6

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Future threats: New avenues of investigative reporting in the fast-changing world of emerging global crises

    Speakers: Robert Eshelman of Society of Environmental Journalists, VICE News; Deborah Nelson of University of Maryland; Andrew Revkin of Pace University; Josh Meyer of POLITICO

    **Moderated by Josh Meyer, Medill National Security Journalism Initiative

    Some of the best and most important new investigative stories involve emerging threats like environmental/climate change, illegal resource exploitation, migration and refugees and food, water and energy security. Come hear from reporters covering these issues, and how they're using innovative tools, techniques and technologies like satellite imagery and drones to get their award-winning stories. ​

     

    Salon C

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    How reporters can best protect themselves and their sources

    Speakers: Ross Garber of Shipman & Goodwin LLP; Adam Goldman of The New York Times; Joel Kurtzberg of Cahill Gordon Reindel LLP; Mark MacDougall of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, LLP

    How do you know if your story might trigger a lawsuit or a leak investigation? Should you keep your notes or throw them out? How much do you tell your editors? Your colleagues? What are best email practices? Do you know what is privilege and who owns it? Hear from top defense lawyers and a Pulitzer-Prize winning investigative reporter who have been embroiled in these toxic investigations. 

     

    Franklin 3&4

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Research independence day: Top 100 tips to liberate your searching

    Speakers: Barbara Gray of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism; Margot Williams of The Intercept

    Muckrakers will leave with a basket full of the latest tools and tricks for public records research, online privacy and advanced search techniques, alerting services and personal web caching and archiving.

     

    Salon E

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Demo

    Scripter: The story begins here... (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Altaf Khatri of Scripter

    Come to the debut presentation of the world's first visual aggregated data repository. Scripter’s platform provides the ability to collect, organize, plot, analyze and present your data (text, documents, photos, video and audio) on a stunning graphical story canvas. Scripter is where the “Power of the Pen meets the Power of Technology.”

     

    Franklin 7

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Friday - #2)

    Speaker: Jim Strickland of WSB-Atlanta

    **Moderated by Jim Strickland, WSB-Atlanta

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Friday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. Thursday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Hands-on

    Under pressure: Real life in real time with breaking news

    Speaker: Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area

    Come experience the real heart pounding excitement of a breaking news simulation where your investigative reporting and computer assisted reporting skills will be put through the ringer and to the test as teams compete to see who can break real, enterprise news in a minute by minute breaking news scenario. Sharpen your skills or learn new techniques to take back to your newsroom to help your team win the day the next time a big breaking news story happens in your backyard. This class can be useful to anyone from novice beginners to experienced internet jockeys. See how good your skills really are.

     

    Room 404

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Adventures in the oil patch: Fracking, earthquakes and corporate influence

    Speakers: Ziva Branstetter of The Washington Post; Lisa Song of ProPublica; Mike Soraghan of E&E News

    Join us for a wide-ranging discussion on watchdog stories you can do in your state tracking the influence and impact of the energy industry. We'll tell you how to report on induced earthquakes, spills, oilfield safety, pollution, weak regulation and corporate influence involving oil and gas operations. Whether you live in an oil or gas producing state or not, your readers and viewers are impacted by these issues and we'll tell you how to frame them. 

     

    Franklin 5&6

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Visual video toolbox

    Speakers: Jeremy Jojola of KUSA/9News Denver; Bryan Staples of WTVF-Nashville; Evan Stulberger of WNBC New York City

    You've got a great story. A real blockbuster. Just one problem. There's. No. Video.

    How do you *show* concepts like fraud, waste, and conflict of interest in the investigative video story? 

    This panel of expert storytellers will share creative methods and tools, revealing strategies and memorable techniques that won’t just bring video-poor stories to life, but will transform them into clear, powerful pieces that connect with audiences.

    Franklin 9&10

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Ethnography for journalists: Storytelling and the deep dive

    Speakers: Sarah Stillman of The New Yorker; Paige Williams of The New Yorker

    This session explores the kind of deep-dive, immersive reporting that produces narratives as varied as Stillman's "Where Are the Children?" and Williams's "The Tallest Trophy," both from recent issues of The New Yorker. Such storytelling requires an investment in people and place; it demands the kind of detailed, fly-on-the-wall reporting that Walt Harrington calls "intimate journalism," and shares parallels with ethnography, the scientific description of how a community or culture lives.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Bridge inspections

    Speaker: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    Every state has bridges: how safe are yours? This is a question that appeals to everyone (we all drive and/or walk on bridges), and the National Bridge Inventory can help you answer it. In this session we'll dive into the data for Pennsylvania, discuss additional sources, and sketch out stories that work in every city. ​To get the most from this session, you should have some experience working with data in spreadsheets.

     

    Room 404

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Hands-on

    Getting data into Excel

    Speaker: Patti DiVincenzo of IRE and NICAR

    Don't let hard-to-use data ruin your day. Learn how to import a variety of formats (such as text files, HTML tables, PDFs) into Excel.

     

    Room 401

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Demo

    Internet site fingerprints: Looking for telltale signs that suggest connections between websites (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Griff Palmer of independent journalist

    A company presenting itself as a legitimate, global corporate citizen has been described to you by former insiders as an Internet fraud scheme. The former insiders have identified several Web sites that they say are part of the scheme, and have given you rock-solid evidence. Your sources tell you their confirmed sites are part of a much larger network. The company allegedly behind it all has a history of litigiousness, and has gone to great lengths to cover up its alleged ties to the fraudulent network. Griff Palmer will show how widely available Internet tools can help solidify such a story.

     

    Franklin 7

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating the justice system (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)

    Speakers: John Hollway of Penn Law School; Beth Hundsdorfer of Belleville News-Democrat; George Pawlaczyk of Belleville News-Democrat; John Roman of Urban Institute; Douglas Starr of Boston University; Ted Gest of Criminal Justice Journalists

    **Moderated by Ted Gest, Criminal Justice Journalists

    Investigative reporters have long covered errors in the justice system, but only recently have scholars and other experts been systematically examining these mistakes to discover patterns, and ways that flaws can be corrected to prevent their repetition. The director of a University of Pennsylvania program, the Quattrone Center for the Fair Administration of Justice, will describe its approach, as will a journalist who has written about it. We also will hear from a criminologist who will discuss use of data in justice system investigations by journalists, and from two reporters who investigated Southern Illinois authorities' failure to bring felony sex crime cases. 

     

    Franklin 1&2

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Muckraking around the world

    Speakers: Dayo Aiyetan of International Centre for Investigative Reporting; Wahyu Dhyatmika of Tempo Magazine; Jan Gunnar Furuly of Aftenposten; Rana Sabbagh of Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism (ARIJ); David Kaplan of Global Investigative Journalism Network

    **Moderated by David Kaplan, Global Investigative Journalism Network

    Investigative reporting has gone global. Come hear four pioneers from Africa, Asia, Europe and the Middle East talk about the extraordinary successes -- and daunting challenges -- as muckraking spreads worldwide. And find out how to get connected to your colleagues overseas when your stories move across borders. Among our guests are the hosts of the next Global Investigative Journalism Conference; the director of the Middle East's premier investigative journalism organization; a Nieman fellow from Indonesia's top investigative magazine; and the founder of Nigeria's investigative reporting center. 

     

    Salon D

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Open records laws: Strategies for successful negotiations

    Speakers: Hannah Levintova of Mother Jones; Joshua B. Pribanic of Public Herald; Carrie McGuire of Office of Government Information Services (OGIS); Terry Mutchler of Pepper Hamilton LLP

    **Moderated by Carrie McGuire, Office of Government Information Services (OGIS)

    Want to get records of the gas and oil industry drilling in your backyard? How about records involving police brutality at your local department? Want to report on what’s in the water storage ponds at Marcelleis Shale gas sites? If a private company doing business with a public agency generates a record, can that be accessed?  A veteran team of investigative journalists and national open records expert will offer hands on advice on obtaining public records at a time when all levels of governments are clamping down on record access. Learn how to successfully navigate the ins and outs of state and federal FOIA laws and win access in real time.

     

    Salon C

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Friday - #3)

    Speaker: Kevin Keeshan of NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations

    **Moderated by Kevin Keeshan, NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Friday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. Thursday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    SHOWCASE PANEL: Sexual assault investigations - Empathy, accuracy, transparency (Sponsored by Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma)

    Speakers: Teresa Braeckel; Sheila Coronel of Columbia University; Stephen Coll of Columbia Journalism School; Elana Newman of University of Tulsa; Nicole Noren of ESPN; Bruce Shapiro of Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma

    **Moderated by Bruce Shapiro, Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma

    The controversy over Rolling Stone's retracted story "A Rape On Campus" raised new challenges for investigations involving sexual assault at universities and other institutions. Is it possible to report with empathy toward victims and still meet standards of accuracy and fairness? What obligations do reporters have toward students who press sexual assault claims - and to those who are accused? What are the best practices in covering campus sexual assault stories, and what are the lessons learned from the Rolling Stone debacle? 

     

    Salon E

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Media lawyers brown bag

    Speakers: Frank LoMonte of Brechner Center for Freedom of Information; Amy Ginensky of Pepper Hamilton LLP; Terry Mutchler of Pepper Hamilton LLP

    Does your investigation contain complex legal questions? Unsure of how to proceed? During the media lawyers brown bag, between 12:45 and 2 p.m. on Friday, June 5, bring your lunch and your questions for a personal discussion with some prominent media law experts that will be presenting throughout the 2015 IRE Conference. We'll provide drinks and dessert.

    Franklin 3&4

    12:45 pm - 2:00 pm

  • Panel

    20 tools to fortify your social media

    Speaker: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR

    Whether you’re a social media novice or sophisticate, you’ll discover new tools and tactics with these proven apps and websites. Most are free or low cost. Tame Twitter with apps to help you find sources, uncover connections and mine posts. Discover ways to find social posts by location to target specific neighborhoods or communities for sources and information. Learn about simple tools to make compelling charts, maps, and other visuals to make your posts more shareable and engaging. Find ways to manage the social media firehose with automated curation, scheduled posts and effective monitoring.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast deep dives 2

    Speakers: Vicky Nguyen of NBC Bay Area; Liz Wagner of NBC Bay Area; Jim Strickland of WSB-Atlanta; Tisha Thompson of ESPN; Rick Yarborough of NBC4 Washington

    From undercover and interview techniques to research and records requests, watch some of the best investigative stories of the year and hear from the journalists behind the work.

     

    Franklin 8

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Avoiding legal trouble

    Speakers: Steve Chung of NBCUniversal; Barbara Wall of Gannett/USA TODAY Network; Kathleen Johnston of independent journalist

    **Moderated by Kathleen Johnston, independent journalist

    Learn why it’s not better to ask for forgiveness rather than permission when tackling that big project. Two of broadcast’s best lawyers answer your thorny legal questions and the importance of getting your counsel involved early the investigation process. 

     

    Franklin 9&10

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Covering the economics of medicine (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Dean Baker of Center for Economic and Policy Research; David Cay Johnston of DCReport; Alicia Mundy of Washington Monthly

    With healthcare costing 17.4 percent of the economy, knowing who gets the money, why we spend twice the average of other rich countries and how to think about cost issues can be valuable in identifying stories. Two journalists who have long reported on health care economics and an economist who has written extensively on how patent law and trade policies drive up health care costs will show you the data and suggest ways to think about the issues.

     

    Salon C

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Cracking the political piggy bank: An introduction to campaign finance data (Sponsored by Rockefeller Brothers Fund)

    Speaker: Ben Wieder of McClatchy

    Learn how to access and analyze federal and state campaign finance data to follow the money in your community. We’ll cover how to keep tabs on top donors to your local Congressmen and Senators, and how to track political action committees active in their races. You’ll work with data from the Federal Election Commission and learn about other resources available for tracking influence in federal and state elections.

    This session is good for reporters who have some experience working with data in spreadsheets.

     

    Room 404

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Funding the independent investigation (Sponsored by Fund for Investigative Journalism)

    Speakers: Esther Kaplan of The Investigative Fund; Jane Sasseen of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism; Ricardo Sandoval-Palos of InsideClimate News; Laird Townsend of Freelance Investigative Reporters and Editors (FIRE); Brant Houston of University of Illinois; Nathalie Applewhite of Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

    **Moderated by Brant Houston, University of Illinois

    This session will present an overview of the challenges to funding an independent investigation, whether by a single freelancer or by an investigative reporting center, and some solutions. Funders will give tips on how to apply to their programs and how to write a successful application. The session allows extended time for questions and answers.

    Salon D

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Demo

    Get the Sqoop: An easier way to search and set alerts for public records information (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Bill Hankes of Sqoop

    Retrieving and searching through public records is the lifeblood of investigative reporting, yet it can be painful. Worse, if you’re a business journalist, is missing the scoop because a particular disclosure was filed 10 minutes after you searched for it. If only you could be alerted when there was a disclosure you were interested in.

    In this session, learn about tools journalists are using to get a jump on the story. You’ll see case studies of nationally and regionally significant stories that reporters generated by using public data tools, everything from changes in the CFO’s office at Google, to insight into Boeing’s use of technology in its manufacturing process, to discovery of the federal government’s pressuring a major consumer electronics company to reveal data about its users, and more.

    Although the session will cover a number of public data sites, the emphasis will be on the SEC, the United States Patent Office and the federal court system’s PACER (public access to court automated records). The session will review how to find specific types of corporate information in different types of SEC forms such as executive compensation, how to quickly evaluate the newsworthiness of patent applications and grants, and how to maximize PACER data given its paywall.

    The session is led by Bill Hankes, the founder and CEO of Sqoop, a news discovery service for journalists.

     

    Franklin 7

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Getting started with R

    Speaker: Ryann Grochowski Jones of ProPublica

    Add statistical heft to your reporting by using R, a free, powerful open-source programming language. This session will tackle the basics of R: importing data, installing packages, working with variables, and sorting and organizing your data. 

    This session is good for: People comfortable working with code, people with basic data knowledge.

     

    Room 401

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Interviewing liars

    Speakers: Matt Apuzzo of The New York Times; Don Borelli of The Soufan Group; Barry McManus of Patriot Group

    An investigative reporter, a former CIA polygraphist, and an FBI counterterrorism agent give you the tools you need for any interview. Learn how the FBI prepares for an interview and how intelligence professionals build rapport with people who have no incentive to talk. How can you tell when you're being lied to? How should you respond when it happens? And find out how to keep people talking, even when they know they should not.

     

    Salon E

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating the investigators: Digging into regulatory agencies

    Speakers: Howard Berkes of NPR; Tom Frank of CNN; Jay LaMonica of Al Jazeera America; Doug Pardue of independent journalist

    **Moderated by Jay LaMonica, Al Jazeera America

    From bedrooms to airplanes to coal mines, investigators and regulators are supposed to enforce and protect. This panel looks at what happens when investigators don’t do their jobs and investigative reporters step in. Panelists will discuss investigations into the failures of police and courts to protect victims of domestic violence, and the failures of federal regulators to overcome conflicts of interest and regulatory weakness in response to coal mine hazards and crashes of small planes.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Writing master class: "Before the Law"

    Speakers: Jennifer Gonnerman of The New Yorker; Stephen Engelberg of ProPublica

    **Moderated by Stephen Engelberg, ProPublica

    Jennifer Gonnerman, a New Yorker staff writer, will walk the audience through her heartbreaking story about Kalief Browder, an 18-year old who spent three years inside New York’s Riker’s Island jail awaiting trial for stealing a backpack, charges that were ultimately dropped. Attendees will get the most out of this session if they spent some time with “Above the Law,’’ a finalist for the Pulitzer in feature writing which can be found here: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/10/06/before-the-law

     

    Franklin 5&6

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Demo

    A case study in virtual reality: Creating an Ebola documentary (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Fergus Pitt of Tow Center - Columbia University

    This session will present what’s been learned from our prototype production: A VR documentary about the spread of ebola in West Africa; a partnership between The Tow Center For Digital Journalism at Columbia University, PBS FRONTLINE and the Secret Location interactive agency.

    It will cover the VR landscape for journalism and the adjacent fields, including just enough history to set the scene and use the advances of our predecessors. And then it’s onto sharing our experience so far: lessons about working in this massively new medium. It seems to require journalists to re-learn huge swathes of their craft, but almost everyone is in the same boat. This presentation will get specific: talking about narrative tools, production equipment. Attendees should come away with enough of a solid knowledge base from which to start putting together a VR production process.

    Franklin 7

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: How some of the best work gets done

    Speakers: Joel Grover of NBC4 Los Angeles; Brian Ross of Brian Ross Investigates; Phil Williams of WTVF-Nashville

    Three veteran journalists discuss how they produce solid, award-winning investigations year after year -- and keep the bosses happy.

     

    Franklin 9&10

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Covering threats against journalists overseas without leaving town

    Speakers: Courtney Mabeus of The Virginian-Pilot; Dana Priest of Phillip Merrill College of Journalism; Kamran Shafi of The Express Tribune

    This session will cover the  methodology used to research individual journalists imprisoned overseas including the use of social media to find and interview the colleagues and families of prisoners. Both the methodology and the social media tools can be easily adapted to report on other subjects outside of the United States without leaving the country. This session, which includes the perspective of a formerly imprisoned reporter, also will address the reasons why every journalist should consider investigating issues of press freedom around the world.

     

    Franklin 5&6

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Management track: Dodging the bullets - making your stories as error and libel free as possible

    Speakers: Fernando Diaz of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Bill Marimow of The Philadelphia Inquirer; Les Zaitz of ----0000 Institution Not Present 0000----, Malheur Enterprise; Robin Fields of ProPublica

    **Moderated by Robin Fields, ProPublica

    With the lessons of Rolling Stone’s retracted campus rape story fresh in our minds, we examine the editor’s role in making sure that investigations meet standards of truth and fairness. We’ll discuss the choices made in each stage of the reporting and writing process, from the degree of confirmation that’s required to when it is and isn’t okay to use anonymous sources. 

     

    Salon C

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Hands-on

    More with R

    Speaker: Coulter Jones of The Wall Street Journal

    Start using the free stats program R to quickly do statistics for stories. This session will showcase simple charting, analysis techniques and other tools in R that can be used on a daily basis by reporters.

    This session is good for: People who attended Getting Started with R or are comfortable working with code, and basic data knowledge.

    Room 401

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Prisons, jails and punishment: The real story (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)

    Speakers: Julie Brown of Miami Herald; David Rudovsky of Penn Law School; Eileen Sullivan of The Associated Press; Ted Gest of Criminal Justice Journalists; John Wetzel of Pennsylvania Department of Corrections

    **Moderated by Ted Gest, Criminal Justice Journalists

    Corrections practices are getting more scrutiny from the media amid criticism of mass incarceration and poor conditions behind bars in many places. We will hear from the Pennsylvania prison secretary, who also is a member of a national commission examining the federal prison system, a civil rights lawyer who has filed lawsuits over prison and jail problems, and journalists who have covered the troubled Florida prison system and a growing and controversial practice of "risk assessment" being used in corrections to help decide on who should be locked up.

     

    Salon D

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Friday - #4)

    Speaker: Philip Drechsler of NBC4 Los Angeles

    **Moderated by Phil Drechsler, NBC4 Los Angeles

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Friday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. Thursday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Stonewalled: Strategies for getting what you need out of government

    Speakers: Rob Barry of The Wall Street Journal; Walt Bogdanich of The New York Times; Carol Leonnig of The Washington Post; Charles Lewis of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    **Moderated by Charles Lewis, Investigative Reporting Workshop

    The challenges are familiar to us all. You can only talk to a spokesperson (who has no actual knowledge of the topic). The source you need is never available. They keep telling you that you can have the docs or the data -- tomorrow. What do you do when government agencies put up roadblocks to keep you from the story? Learn tips and strategies to break through the barriers.

     

    Salon E

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    The anatomy of a crisis: Tracking the records trail

    Speakers: Danielle Ivory of The New York Times; Ken Armstrong of ProPublica

    One event can set in motion the creation of data and documents that can prove useful to reporters. In this panel, we'll follow the methodology of picking through the paper and database trails to build an investigation after a crisis. While the panel will focus on two case studies, auto recalls and mudslides, attendees will leave with ideas of how to seek out additional information after an event. 

    Franklin 3&4

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    The art of developing sources

    Speakers: Manny Garcia of USA TODAY Network; James Polk of Retired; Bernice Yeung of ProPublica; Matt Goldberg of NBCUniversal

    **Moderated by Matt Goldberg, NBC4 Los Angeles

    Identify who you need to know and how to get them to talk. And how to get the best information and interviews through source development and interviewing techniques.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Hands-on

    Under pressure: Real life in real time with breaking news (repeat session)

    Speaker: Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area

    Come experience the real heart pounding excitement of a breaking news simulation where your investigative reporting and computer assisted reporting skills will be put through the ringer and to the test as teams compete to see who can break real, enterprise news in a minute by minute breaking news scenario. Sharpen your skills or learn new techniques to take back to your newsroom to help your team win the day the next time a big breaking news story happens in your backyard. This class can be useful to anyone from novice beginners to experienced internet jockeys. See how good your skills really are.

     

    Room 404

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Your presentation style

    Speakers: Barry Nash of The Coaching Company; Barrett Nash of The Coaching Company

    The Coaching Company Founder and Head Coach, Barry Nash, will talk about the challenge of addressing an audience you can neither see nor hear, the subtle and not-so-subtle ways it can compromise your message, and what to do about it.  He’ll share related research and load you up with practical tips on how to dress, move and talk so that viewers are more likely to “get” your stories, and your stories are more likely to get the attention they deserve.

     

    Franklin 9&10

    4:50 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Cleaning data with regular expressions and more

    Speaker: Agustin Armendariz of The New York Times

    An introduction to regular expressions. Before any data analysis can happen, there's typically a lot of work done cleaning and getting to know the data. This class will help you add regular expressions to your toolkit. Think of regular expressions as search patterns on steroids. Instead of finding specific terms you'll learn to describe general patterns you wish to uncover. Regular expressions can be used in various places. For this class we'll use a text editor to explore the syntax of regular expressions.

     

    Beginners are welcome, but if you've parsed text with string functions before it may help you conceptualize things better.

    Room 404

    4:50 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Digital presentation for investigations

    Speakers: Paul Cheung of Knight Foundation; Benjamin Herold of Education Week; Giannina Segnini of Columbia Journalism School; Erika Owens of OpenNews

    **Moderated by Erika Owens, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews

    You spend months, maybe even years, finding the data, cultivating sources, and putting together an investigation you know is really important. We'll look at some case studies and best practices of how to make sure the online version of your story is as compelling and engaging as it needs to be.

     

    Salon D

    4:50 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Examining voter access issues: Covering the fight over the right to vote (Sponsored by Rockefeller Brothers Fund)

    Speakers: Ari Berman of The Nation; Paul Overberg of The Wall Street Journal; Myrna Perez of Brennan Center for Justice

    As the 2016 election campaign begins, a pitched battle over who can vote has been already well underway  — in legislatures, at the ballot box and especially in the courts. The Supreme Court recently weakened a key section of the Voting Rights Act, guaranteeing more battles to come. This panel will show you changes to watch for in your state, how to get information to tell the story and how to find and analyze local data on voters and voting.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    4:50 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Contracts

    Speaker: Danielle Ivory of The New York Times

    Having the ability to unlock government spending can be a valuable tool for any journalist's arsenal. During this session, we will walk through the online, free websites that allow the public to access federal government contracting data, and how to track down story ideas. This session is good for anyone who has some experience working with data in Excel.

     

    Room 401

    4:50 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Oil on the tracks: Covering the explosive story of crude trains (Sponsored by Society of Environmental Journalists)

    Speakers: Russell Gold of The Wall Street Journal; Grant Robertson of The Globe and Mail; Sarah Feinberg of Federal Railroad Administration

    **Moderated by Russell Gold, The Wall Street Journal

    Every day, several mile-long trains filled with thousands of barrels of crude oil depart North Dakota heading for coastal refineries. These trains are passing through countless large and small cities. And with alarming frequency, these trains are derailing and blowing up with frightening ferocity. This panel will cover what you need to know to report on these so-called “bomb trains.” When did this start? What is in them? What is the government doing about it? You’ll learn how to tell where the trains are and how frequently they’re passing.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    4:50 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Quantity and quality

    Speakers: Aaron Diamant of WSB-Atlanta; John Ferrugia of Rocky Mountain PBS; David Raziq of KSDK-St. Louis

    As more and more newsrooms push investigative content on a daily basis, this panel will focus on best practices to consistently identify and turn the exclusive “daily investigative” story.  We’ll start with where to look for data/documents fast, source development, and the best resources for exclusive lead investigative stories as news is breaking. We’ll take things a step further with a discussion on the process for obtaining and culling sources that make it possible for such exclusive content during ongoing coverage of high profile stories every station in the market is covering. We’ll wrap things up with tips for developing and maintaining an investigative mindset to the daily flow.

     

    Salon C

    4:50 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Friday - #5)

    Speaker: Melissa Blasius of KNXV-Phoenix

    **Moderated by Melissa Blasius-Nuanez, KUSA/9News Denver

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Friday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. Thursday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    4:50 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    SHOWCASE PANEL: The New Muckrakers - The expanding world of investigative journalism

    Speakers: Shani Hilton of BuzzFeed News; Bill Keller of The Marshall Project; Jason Mojica of VICE News; Betsy Reed of The Intercept; Andrew Donohue of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

    **Moderated by Andy Donohue, Reveal/CIR

    The landscape for investigative journalism continues to evolve. In the last year or so, we've seen the expansion of international for-profit startups and the birth of narrowly tailored, but deep, nonprofit organizations. We'll discuss what they're learning as they go, what's working and not working, and what we can expect from them in the future. 

     

    Salon E

    4:50 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Demo

    Tools for transparency from the Sunlight Foundation (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Bill Allison of Foreign Policy; Jacob Fenton of independent journalist; Robert Lannon of Sunlight Foundation; Ryan Sibley of Sunlight Foundation

    See first hand new and improved tools, and get a preview of coming attractions from the Sunlight Foundation. We'll demo tools that can help you research people, follow all the money sluicing through the electoral system -- whether its lobbyists working legislators or dark money groups taking to the airwaves, learn the latest about criminal justice data, and more. 

     

    Franklin 7

    4:50 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Working with whistleblowers

    Speakers: Scott Bronstein of CNN; Steve Riley of Houston Chronicle; Dennis Wagner of The Arizona Republic; Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    **Moderated by Sarah Cohen, The New York Times

    Whistleblowers are a special kind of source and require a special kind of treatment. Three experts will discuss how they handle the delicate negotiations and risks involved.

     

    Franklin 5&6

    4:50 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    IRE Board candidate speeches

    Meet the candidates for the IRE Board of Directors. Learn more about the candidates and election.

    Salon E

    6:00 pm - 6:30 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Conference Registration (Saturday)

    Registration will be located on the 4th floor of the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. 

    Franklin Hall Foyer

    8:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Saturday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.  Sales will be located on the 4th floor of the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown.

    Franklin Hall Foyer

    8:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Panel

    Audio class with Reveal 1 (pre-registered attendees only)

    Wondering how to turn your stories into driveway moments and compelling audio narrative? Then come to an intensive three hour workshop with award winning radio journalists from Reveal, the new investigative program from The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX.

    We will explore the power of audio narrative, how to plan for your radio field gathering to get the most from your interaction with your sources, how to interview for good narrative, and how to build scenes and emotion into your writing. We will discuss different formats used in radio and audio work.

    The field is exploding with the runaway success of podcasts like Serial and 99% Invisible. So whether you're interested in becoming a collaborator of Reveal for your investigative stories, a television journalist experimenting with other platforms or a multimedia storyteller-this workshop will be hands -on training and development. It will be followed by a panel discussion of best practices.

    Seats are limited, so register now!

     

    Room 414/415

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Demo

    Beacon: Embracing and Communicating Impact (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Adrian Sanders of Beacon

    Readers are constantly bombarded with breaking and important stories everyday. So why do they keep funding them on Beacon (more than $1m paid to journalist to date)? We’ve learned that readers fund work because they believe in its potential for impact. We’ll explore the future of funding investigative reporting, and how impact plays a critical role in the value delivered to readers. 

     

    Franklin 7

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Breaking news investigations

    Speakers: Megan Chuchmach of ABC News; Jodie Fleischer of NBC4 Washington; Scott MacFarlane of NBC4 Washington

    When big news breaks will you respond?  Leave the “what is happening” to others. The investigator’s role is to dive head-first into “How did this happen”? “Where else might this happen again”?  “How do we keep this from happening again”? This session show real world examples of how journalists were able to contribute on a big story and why tragedy demands action, answers and results. You’ll also learn how to be a resource for the rest of the newsroom and uncover quick facts that will add depth to the breaking story (and details your competitors won't have).  

     

    Franklin 9&10

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Panel

    From the newsroom to the classroom

    Speakers: Rosemary Armao of SUNY Albany; James F McGinnis of Calkins Media; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University; Dawn Fallik of University of Delaware

    **Moderated by Dawn Fallik, University of Delaware

    Have you ever thought about teaching? Academia is a whole other world and pace from the newsroom but many journalists are making the move. 

    Come hear from former reporters and editors turned academics, from adjuncts to tenured professors. We'll share some basics about applying and salary but also talk about different approaches to teaching investigative reporting, social media sourcing and basic journalism classes. If you already teach and have ideas to share, we'd love to hear them. Feel free to give us chili peppers on Rate My Professor afterward. 

    Franklin 5&6

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to mapping with QGIS: Importing and displaying data

    Speaker: Alexandra Kanik of Louisville Public Media

    Making maps might sound daunting at first, but this class will show you that all you need is good data and a good idea and you can bring location-based information to your viewers quite easily and quickly. We're going to be covering the basics: map types, adding geographic information to maps, selecting data and some general styling. We'll be using QGIS which is a free, open-source mapping program, so you don't have to worry about being able to afford expensive software to use the skills you'll learn in this class. Prerequisites: None. Only a desire to make maps.

     

    Room 402

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Panel

    Investigating what we eat

    Speakers: Mike McGraw of Kansas City Public Television (KCPT); Duff Wilson of Reuters; Bernice Yeung of ProPublica; Rose Ciotta of EdSource

    Pesticides, hormones, antibiotics, bacteria and inadequate inspections have turned food into a hot subject for investigation. This panel will cover how to get behind hype and government stonewalling to report on food safety  in an era of global trade. Topics include labeling and what consumers need to know.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Panel

    On the beat: Healthcare

    Speakers: JoNel Aleccia of Kaiser Health News; Joanne Faryon of inewsource; Christopher Weaver of The Wall Street Journal; Alison Young of USA TODAY Network

    **Moderated by Alison Young, USA TODAY

    The American health care system gathers up vast reams of data in its routine operations: Billing records, public health statistics, inspection reports, and hospitals’ financial data. In recent years, much more of that data has become available to the public—and probing reporters looking for a window into the practices and performance of health care institutions, medical providers and government agencies. Three veteran reporters explain how they’ve tapped emerging sources of data for insights that informed reporting projects, and how you can too. The session will cover the expanding universe of Medicare billing records now available from the federal agency; sources of state and county level data on medical care and public health efforts; and safety data covering drugs and facility inspections. Beyond outlining where to find the data and statistics you need in a fast changing ecosystem, reporters will deliver tips on how to put that information to work in building story ideas, achieving reporting goals and framing anecdote in broader context.

     

    Salon G

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Saturday - #1)

    Speaker: Greg Amante of ESPN's Outside the Lines

    **Moderated by Greg Amante, ESPN's Outside the Lines

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Saturday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. Friday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Panel

    Social media innovations: Investigative reporting and social documentary photography

    Speaker: Jeff Kelly Lowenstein of Grand Valley State University

    Documentary photographers and investigative journalists often come together at the end of a long-term project, but this session will explore what happens when photographers and investigative reporters are in active and ongoing collaboration, particularly in the social media arena. The panel will show multiple examples of how photographers and investigative journalists can use the Instagram platform, and others, to build deeper and wider engagement, reach a national and international audiences and build new sources and story ledes. It is open to all people interested in investigative journalism, photography and your work having the widest possible audience and impact. 

     

    Franklin 1&2

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Hands-on

    Using SQL to interrogate data (part 1)

    Speaker: Malik Singleton of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

    SQL lets you "ask" questions of your data. Run queries to get additional background research from datasets so that you'll have evidence-based questions for your interviews. This first of three sessions will show you how to use Firefox's free SQLite Manager extension, the best way to start learning the language that reads like English questions.

     

    Room 404

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Hands-on

    Web scraping for anyone

    Speaker: Samantha Sunne of independent journalist

    You don't have to write code to coax data off the web - with some clicks and tricks and elbow grease, you can get data and documents even your sources don't want you to have. We'll cover tools you can use out of the box, more advanced techniques, plus secret Internet passageways to the data you want.

     

    Room 401

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Hands-on

    Advanced Excel functions

    Speaker: Aaron Kessler of CNN

    Learn about advanced tricks in Excel that will blow your mind and give you control over your data like never before. Is the government giving you dirty records, or hassling you about how they are formatted? Do you wish there was a column that told you "X" and find yourself manually typing it in?  Never again!  Learn ways to free yourself from such trivial restraints and work your magic over columns and rows like a pro.

     

    Room 401

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Audio class with Reveal 2 (pre-registered attendees only)

    This is a continuation of Audio class with Reveal 1. Please note: Seating is limited and preregistration is required.

     

    Room 414/415

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: 60 stories in 60 minutes

    Speakers: Nicole Vap of KUSA/9News Denver; Lee Zurik of WVUE-New Orleans

    This may be the one panel where you will get stories you can take back to your newsroom and get started on the day you get back from IRE. These 60 stories from broadcast investigative reporters around the country will give you story ideas that will keep you busy until the IRE conference in 2016.

     

    Franklin 9&10

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Buying influence: How to track lobbyists (Sponsored by Rockefeller Brothers Fund)

    Speakers: Sandra Fish of independent journalist; James Grimaldi of The Wall Street Journal; Eric Lipton of The New York Times

    Federal law requires lobbyists to register ​with Congress​. But that registration is just a tip sheet of sorts to getting a full picture of how various corporations are attempting to move their agendas in Washington--or in state capitols where they might also register a lobbying team. We take a look at some of the ​tools and techniques to build out a fuller, more narrative picture of what lobbying looks like by tapping into various databases, websites and other spots. ​We also discuss how states ​require a varying level of reporting, from basic registration to disclosure of payments from clients​ and ​contributions to lawmakers​.​​ ​And we reverse engineer a few stories--to show how the information needed to get a lobbying story on page one came together.

     

    Salon G

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Demo

    Data visualization for reporting (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Kate Golden of The Walkley Foundation; Jaeah Lee of independent journalist

    Graphics! They can help us find interesting story ideas, or pinpoint numbers to use as evidence in our reporting. Often we think of graphics as an end product. When used for reporting, however, graphics are a powerful tool to explore trends and stories. We'll discuss what types of visualizations can help you find stories you may miss, make some visualizations right in Excel, and demo some easy, non-programmatic tools that allow you to go deeper in your data. We'll also cover both numbers and unstructured text as data. These visualizations are not for publication, but rather a sketchpad for reporters and data analysts.

     

    Franklin 7

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Getting great stories from hidden data sets

    Speakers: Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Brad Heath of USA TODAY Network; Janet Roberts of Reuters; John Hillkirk of Kaiser Health News

    **Moderated by John Hillkirk, USA TODAY

    Everybody knows about the Census data, or the Medicare data, or the crime rate statistics, and there are plenty of good trend stories there. But how can you identify and obtain data that nobody else has ever looked at before - and get the government or organization to cough it up. 

     

    Franklin 1&2

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    How to become an instant expert on a topic through Google

    Speaker: Daniel Russell of Google

    It's happened to you--you need to do a story on a topic that's completely outside of your experience. Surely there's someone more qualified? The answer is usually NO. Now what? Now you have to come up to speed on that topic ASAP. In this mini-course, you’ll learn strategies and tactics to use to learn a domain as rapidly as possible. You won't be an expert, but you'll have a bunch of tips and methods to get to competence quickly. You won’t learn to pass the PhD exam in quantum physics, but a little knowledge about learning and Google search strategies can get you through that story.

     

    Salon K/L

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Investigating black boxes

    Speakers: Julia Angwin of ProPublica; Reg Chua of Reuters; Nicholas Diakopoulos of Northwestern University; Jeremy Singer-Vine of BuzzFeed News

    Algorithms increasingly dominate our lives - influencing what information we find, where police are deployed, how stocks are priced, what we're charged for goods. Yet the public's understanding - and media coverage - of these new gatekeepers is still in its infancy. How should and can we be investigating these black boxes, and what are the technical, journalistic and legal challenges involved?  

     

    Franklin 3&4

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Investigating the military

    Speakers: Mark Greenblatt of Scripps Washington Bureau; Eva Parks of KXAS/NBC5 Dallas-Fort Worth; Mary Walsh of CBS News

    This panel is not just three reporters telling “war stories” but experienced journalists sharing their tips and secrets for uncovering and discovering military information.  Learn how you can incorporate some of the same tools and strategies the panelists used to report on a military reporting loophole on sex offenders, soldiers’ complaints of mistreatment and abuse, and groundbreaking behind-the-scenes stories.  And once you’ve gotten in the door – then what?  From navigating military records, to convincing soldiers and military leaders to talk, practical advice you can take back to your shop. 

     

    Franklin 5&6

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Hands-on

    More with QGIS: Basic geographic analysis

    Speaker: Alex Richards of NerdWallet

    In this class we’ll tackle a project to join tables of data together with existing shapefiles and process data consisting of hundreds or thousands of points to give a more meaningful summary display. We’ll also cover some of the fundamentals of editing geographic data and saving it in web-ready formats. 

     

    Room 402

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Saturday - #2)

    Speaker: Dan Krauth of NBC6 Miami

    **Moderated by Dan Krauth, NBC6 Miami

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Saturday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. Friday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Hands-on

    Using SQL to interrogate data (part 2)

    Speaker: Meghan Hoyer of The Associated Press

    The second session in the SQLite workshop will build up your SQL muscles, adding some common tasks that journalists need every day: checking for missing data, grouping your data, getting counts and sums and doing math in SQL.

     

    Room 404

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Audio class with Reveal 3 (pre-registered attendees only)

    This is a continuation of Audio class with Reveal 1. Please note: Seating is limited and preregistration is required.

     

    Room 414/415

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Story structure

    Speakers: Solly Granatstein of The Weather Channel; Brendan Keefe of WXIA-Atlanta; Chris Vanderveen of KUSA/9News Denver; Matt Goldberg of NBCUniversal

    **Moderated by Matt Goldberg, NBC4 Los Angeles

    How do you begin? What do you include? What are you missing? The art of a well told story starts at the beginning of the investigation. We’ll share tips, techniques and real examples for putting together great TV.

     

    Franklin 9&10

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Panel

    Doing investigations with students

    Speakers: David Armstrong of Georgia News Lab; Sheila Coronel of Columbia University; Julia Harte of The Center for Public Integrity; Joanna Bernstein of Reuters; Brant Houston of University of Illinois; Nicholas Nehamas of Miami Herald

    **Moderated by Brant Houston, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Professors and students will talk about how to plan and carry out a successful investigation together. Expect a candid discussion about the challenges of doing investigations within a university and often within a semester.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Panel

    Exploring a Post-9/11 world: A conversation with Laura Poitras

    Speakers: Laura Poitras of The Intercept; Robert Cribb of Toronto Star

    **Moderated by Robert Cribb, Toronto Star

    Academy Award winning documentarian Laura Poitras will talk about her work on a trilogy of films about Post-9-11 America, from documenting the decision by Edward Snowden to leak NSA documents related to its mass surveillance program in "Citizen Four" to her documentaries on Guantanamo Bay and the occupation of Iraq. Poitras, who shared the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service, is a co-founder of The Intercept. 

     

    Salon G

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Liberating data from PDFs

    Speaker: Grant Smith of Reuters

    Want to stick it to government bureaucrats that think they'll foil your investigation by turning over public data in PDFs? Show them who's boss by turning nasty PDFs into usable data. This session is good for PDF newbies.

     

    Room 401

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Panel

    Management track: Balancing enterprise with everything else

    Speakers: Gabriel Escobar of The Philadelphia Inquirer; Kevin Merida of ESPN; Richard Wiens of Honolulu Civil Beat; Kate Marymont of Gannett Company, Inc.

    **Moderated by Kate Marymont, Gannett Company, Inc.

    Communities need credible, relevant investigative journalism as much as ever, yet journalists are pulled many news directions.  How does a manager balance the need to effectively use social media for sourcing and promotion?   Are there better ways to quickly sift out the stories that are destined to fizzle?  There are fewer editors in newsrooms — from managing editors to copy editors.  How do we protect the vigilant editing needed for watchdog work? 

     

    Franklin 5&6

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Map like a pro with ArcGIS online

    Speakers: Robby Deming of Esri; Brian Peterson of Esri

    We all live in a realm of data. But sometimes, spreadsheets and databases aren't the best way to tell your story. Take a hands-on tour of the redesigned ArcGIS Online to see how you can easily create intelligent maps in minutes. Learn how the new Smart Mapping feature in ArcGIS Online can help you investigate patterns in your data and easily create beautiful data visualizations, even if you've never worked with maps or GIS before. If you can use an Internet browser, you can create award-winning maps.

    Prerequisites: None. This class is for anyone who wants to create online maps, whether they're a seasoned pro or a complete novice. You'll walk away with the knowledge you need to go back to your newsroom and start making maps immediately.

    Room 402

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Panel

    Navigating the publishing world: From ebooks to your first novel

    Speakers: Daniel Connolly of The Commercial Appeal; Kirsten Danis of The Marshall Project; Nancy Stancill of independent journalist; Jim MacMillan of Temple University

    **Moderated by Jim MacMillan, Temple University

    There are many paths to getting your work published. This session looks at three different circumstances - turning your project into an ebook, developing your reporting into a book and making the leap to the world of fiction. 

     

     

    Salon K/L

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Panel

    Pick & choose environmental investigations (Sponsored by Society of Environmental Journalists)

    Speakers: Joseph Davis of Society of Environmental Journalists; Robert McClure of InvestigateWest; Andrea Rodgers of Western Environmental Law Center; Naveena Sadasivam of The Texas Observer; Jeff Burnside of independent journalist

    **Moderated by Jeff Burnside, KOMO-Seattle

    This session will dive into several environmental topics that you can investigative no matter where you live. We'll dig into:

    -Fish Consumption Rates: Many states estimate the average fish consumption rate for its residents as a means of setting an allowable water pollution standard. What’s your state’s fish consumption estimate? What does it say about how much pollution your regulators are allowing? How does it compare to your neighboring state? Why the difference?

    -Dam Safety: They’re almost everywhere yet there’s a level of secrecy imposed on the National Inventory of Dams. We’ll offer databases and tips for local reporters to examine safety records and other relevant issues. http://tinyurl.com/SEJdams

    -Manure: It ain’t what it used to be. Modern factory farms have made this a pervasive issue nationwide that gets little coverage. Very powerful interests exert influence on state and municipal officeholders when it comes to regulating (or scaling back regulation) of manure, runoff, containment, etc. Yet new lawsuits and scientific findings are now pushing back (“Your ruling will change everything” a dairy exec recently told a federal judge). Drinking water, shellfish beds, fishing, swimming beaches, and much more is affected. We’ll provide contacts, sources, databases, lawsuit transcripts, etc.

    -Pipeline Safety: There is a pipeline safety story in almost every community, and one key to those stories is skill at using available map data. This data is imperfect, but no longer AS secret as it once was. PHMSA may have new regulations that could be unveiled in time for IRE.

    •  

    Franklin 1&2

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Demo

    Reporting and tracking with Storify (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR

    Explore a new way of using Storify -- as a private gathering place for your social media reporting and tracking. Learn how to set up private drafts in Storify as an efficient way of searching and saving social media posts from Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Tumblr and other platforms. Organize by beat or sources. Turn Storify into your own personal social media reporter's notebook.

     

    Franklin 7

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Saturday - #3)

    Speaker: Lauren Sweeney of WINK-Fort Myers

    **Moderated by Lauren Sweeney, KPRC-Houston

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Saturday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. Friday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Using SQL to interrogate data (part 3)

    Speaker: Griff Palmer of independent journalist

    This session will show how enterprising reporters can take data sets never designed to be joined together, and in the joining, come up with stories. We will also devote time to conditional grouping of data.

     

    Room 404

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Awards Luncheon

    IRE Awards Luncheon featuring keynote speaker James Risen of The New York Times (Sponsored by The Philadelphia Inquirer/Daily News)

    Speaker: James Risen of The New York Times

    A highlight of the IRE conference, the IRE Awards Luncheon begins at noon on Saturday in Salon A-F. We will present the 2014 IRE Awards and salute some of the best investigative work of the past year, and will hear from keynote speaker James Risen.

    Admission to the luncheon is included with your conference registration.  Guest tickets can be purchased for $55. Guest tickets will be available for pick-up at the IRE Sales Table on the 4th floor of the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown beginning Wednesday, June 3 at 3 p.m.

    This year’s luncheon will also include a short video commemorating IRE’s 40th Anniversary and the presentation of our new Founders' Award.

    Salon A-F

    12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    An introduction to Python (part 1)

    Speaker: Tom Meagher of The Marshall Project

    This hands-on workshop will teach basic newsroom programming concepts using the Python language. We'll cover how to deconstruct a common reporting task--gathering a table of data from a public agency's website--and assemble a solution from useful Python libraries that you can use again and again.

    **Prerequisites: Attendees should be familiar with HTML and the command line and be comfortable with databases and SQL. If you've ever written a string function in Excel ("=left(A2,5)"), you'll be fine.

    Room 404

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Animated video for storytelling

    Speaker: Kavya Sukumar of Hearken

    Often complex ideas in a story don't get the attention they deserve because, let’s face it, you are allowed only one lede. Short animated videos are a great way to remedy this. They can bubble up interesting content in an easily shareable form that works on most devices. In this session, learn to create and publish your own animated video from scratch. This session is good for beginners new to making videos as well as for people with some experience in video production looking to add animation to your skill set.

     

    Room 401

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Beyond words: Storytelling at the intersection of cool & creative

    Speakers: Gabriel Dance of The New York Times; Amy Julia Harris of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Tori Marlan of independent journalist; Ken Armstrong of ProPublica

    **Moderated by Ken Armstrong, The Marshall Project

    Tired of the same old same old? You know: anecdotal lead –> nut graph –> three-part series, all with lots and lots of words? Then turn your investigation into a web comic, or a work of performance art, or an awesome interactive graphic. Cool things can happen when we partner with poets, artists, musicians and web developers.

     

    Salon K/L

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast deep dives 3

    Speakers: Gio Benitez of ABC News; Jeremy Finley of WSMV-Nashville; Jenna Susko of NBC4 Los Angeles

    From undercover and interview techniques to research and records requests, watch some of the best investigative stories of the year and hear from the journalists behind the work.

     

    Franklin 8

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Hitting the ground running - new market, new beat

    Speakers: Danielle Leigh of ABC7 New York/WABC; Wendy Saltzman of WPVI-Philadelphia; Mc Nelly Torres of independent journalist

    Many people switch jobs, switch beats, or have to learn a new medium. This panel will give tips on how to hit the ground running with stories and ideas as soon as you start.

     

    Franklin 9&10

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Campus coverage: Examining the cost of a college education (Sponsored by Lumina Foundation)

    Speakers: Kim Clark of Education Writers Association; Robert Kelchen of Seton Hall University; Jonah Newman of The Chicago Reporter

    You want to report on the soaring cost of college, but it feels like every day you hear about a new study or ranking on college cost and student debt. Where do you start and how do you know which reports to trust? This session will point you to key data sources for covering the cost of college in your city or state and the national datasets that will help you give your story context. We’ll also provide you with the important data fine print, so you can avoid common pitfalls and get the story right.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Creating a document state of mind

    Speakers: Mike McGraw of Kansas City Public Television (KCPT); James B. Steele of independent journalist; Joe Stephens of The Washington Post

    Experienced investigative reporters share their personal lists of little-known but powerful documents that anyone can use to super-charge a project or muscle-up daily beat coverage. They also provide practical guidelines for obtaining, examining, managing and triangulating routine documents to unleash their full investigative power.

     

    Salon G

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Doing stats in Excel

    Speaker: David Donald of Investigative Reporting Workshop-American University

    You're comfortable doing data analysis in spreadsheets for your stories but would like to take your data journalism skills to the next level. This session introduces using statistics for stories through the comfort of Microsoft Excel. It will cover a more systematic way of thinking about your approach to your data and then applying your new understanding through descriptive statistics and regression analysis with an emphasis on storytelling. Familiarity with spreadsheets is necessary but no experience with statistics is assumed.

     

    Room 402

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Demo

    From words to pictures: Text analysis and visualization (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Nicholas Diakopoulos of Northwestern University

    You've got a massive pile of text: Some Ferguson tweets, a box of now OCRed documents, or maybe a corpus of press releases you scraped. How do you make sense of it? In this session I'll introduce some alternatives for using text visualization to see your texts in different ways. Then I'll talk about some of the machinery for text analysis that you'll need to get there, with pointers out to Python tools. Next year you'll be visualizing the SOTU like a pro.

     

    Franklin 7

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Immigration: What part of "illegal" don't you understand? (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)

    Speakers: Cindy Carcamo of Los Angeles Times; Lawrence Downes of The New York Times; Maria Sacchetti of The Boston Globe; Michael Matza of The Philadelphia Inquirer

    **Moderated by Michael Matza, The Philadelphia Inquirer

    For many, anyone who enters the U.S. without permission, or overstays a visa, commits the original sin, and nothing you write or broadcast after that seems to matter. So where does illegal immigration fall on the spectrum of crimes, and how should you explain it in your stories? For legal immigration: Is the new arrival skilled or unskilled; adult or minor? Is an employer willing to sponsor him or her? Are they eligible for asylum because of persecution in their homelands? Critics tell foreigners to "get in line" before coming to America, but what does that line look like? 

     

    Franklin 5&6

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Management track: You want to do what? Vetting story ideas

    Speakers: Lois Norder of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Mark Rochester of Detroit Free Press; George Stanley of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Robert Rosenthal

    **Moderated by Robert Rosenthal, Reveal/CIR

    How do editors make the decisions that lead to great stories? It's probably more art than science. It's about listening, trust, instincts, and knowing and understanding your reporter. And it's about following your gut, because sometimes you see something no one else does. Hear from 4 veteran editors on how to ask tough questions related to sources, documents and access.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Tell me a (data) story I won't forget

    Speakers: Bill Dedman of Newsday; T. Christian Miller of ProPublica; Dylan Purcell of The Philadelphia Inquirer; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    **Moderated by Jennifer LaFleur, The Center for Investigative Reporting/Reveal

    As compelling as data can be, it can't grab readers like a good story can. We'll talk about writing the data story and how to make it something folks can't put down, stop scrolling or stop listening to. What can you do as you’re reporting to help tell a better story later? When you go to write your story, how can you get all your findings in without bogging readers down in numbers?

     

    Room 414/415

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    An introduction to Python (part 2)

    Speaker: Tom Meagher of The Marshall Project

    This hands-on workshop will teach basic newsroom programming concepts using the Python language. We'll cover how to deconstruct a common reporting task--gathering a table of data from a public agency's website--and assemble a solution from useful Python libraries that you can use again and again.

    **Prerequisites: Attendees should be familiar with HTML and the command line and be comfortable with databases and SQL. If you've ever written a string function in Excel ("=left(A2,5)"), you'll be fine.

    Room 404

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Avoiding prying eyes

    Speakers: Julia Angwin of ProPublica; Jack Gillum of ProPublica; Trish Wilson of The Associated Press; Jesse Holcomb of Pew Research Center

    **Moderated by Jesse Holcomb, Pew Research Center

    Governments and private snoops are forcing journalists to change how we use technology to safeguard our reporting. We’ll examine best security practices that reporters and editors can take to shield their sources, both in the United States and around the globe. And we’ll showcase free — and easy — tools that journalists can use to help keep their work private.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Managing the broadcast team

    Speakers: Jennifer Cobb of KHOU-Houston; Debra Juarez of NBC 5 Chicago; Nicole Vap of KUSA/9News Denver

    Whether you work with one investigative reporter or an entire team, you know that managing this creative and passionate group of people can be challenging. This panel is for anyone looking for advice from those who have worked with a wide variety of reporters, photojournalists and producers. What they have learned the hard way—you can learn in an hour.

     

    Franklin 9&10

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Campus coverage: Investigating student rights violations - From fraternities to the administration (Sponsored by Lumina Foundation)

    Speakers: Walt Bogdanich of The New York Times; Duane Pohlman of Sinclair Broadcast Group; Samantha Sunne of independent journalist; Frank LoMonte of Brechner Center for Freedom of Information

    **Moderated by Frank LoMonte, Student Press Law Center

    Student civil rights have been a hot topic on campuses the past few years from sexual-assault victims being ignored by administrations to fraternities singing songs with racial slurs to marching bands with a “sexualized culture” asking members to march in underwear and answer to derogatory nicknames.

     

    Room 414/415

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Demo

    Free tools to get the job done (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Matt Carroll of Northeastern University; Adam Schweigert of Institute for Nonprofit News

    On a budget? Who isn't these days? But you don't have to spend a penny (or much) to own powerful and easy-to-use tools for gathering, analyzing, presenting data, or for powerful new ways of telling stories. We'll tell you about some of the most popular stuff available, from tools for handling and analyzing data to basics such as free spreadsheets, text editors, storytelling tools, and photo editing software.

    Franklin 7

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Hands-on

    Geocoding: Turning addresses into locations

    Speaker: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    Have you ever received data that included addresses? In this session we'll talk about when it helps to display those addresses on a map, and show you how to do it using the Census Bureau's free online geocoder. We'll also talk about other free (or cheap) geocoding services and discuss checking for accuracy and avoiding potential traps and pitfalls.

    This session will be good for you if you have some basic experience working with data in spreadsheets.

     

    Room 401

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Human rights reporting (Sponsored by Temple University School of Media and Communication)

    Speakers: John Carlos Frey of The Investigative Fund; Michael Hudson of The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Syed Nazakat of Centre for Investigative Journalism, India

    Human rights abuses don't happen just in far-off lands. This session will look at how journalists can uncover torture and other official misconduct and institutional failures that harm vulnerable populations. Stories highlighted by this panel include a multi-media investigation of World Bank-financed land grabs and environmental damage, an exposé of India's anti-terrorism rendition program and a TV probe of how slow response by the U.S. Border Patrol has contributed to the deaths of hundreds of people crossing into Texas.

     

    Franklin 5&6

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Humanizing numbers

    Speakers: Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Paula Lavigne of ESPN; Ron Nixon of The Associated Press

    Even though great data and information can power an investigative story, you need people to illustrate what you’ve found. The characters in your story will hammer the data home and show your audience why your investigation matters to them. We’ll talk about how to find the strongest characters in your data and in your investigation and develop them to carry your story.

     

    Salon G

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating law enforcement

    Speakers: Eric Flack of WUSA9 Washington; Jeremy Rogalski of KHOU-Houston; Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area

    How do we serve as watchdogs of those charged with protecting and serving? With the national focus on police behavior and potential misbehavior -- a hot topic in just about every newsroom, this panel will share tips and hints about how to cover law enforcement from reporters who have done it for years. Where do you confront? What happens when police stonewall? How do you find out secrets that are often swept under the “official internal review” rug?

     

    Franklin 3&4

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Reporting on diverse communities that aren't your own (Sponsored by Asian American Journalists Association)

    Speakers: Sheila Coronel of Columbia University; Michael Matza of The Philadelphia Inquirer; Sabrina Vourvoulias of AL DÍA News; Sherry Yu of Temple University

    What are the challenges journalists face when covering diverse communities that are not their own? Barriers of language and access can hinder deeper reporting, and thorny issues around race and cultures can offend readers and harm their subjects. Panelists will not only explore why publishing more and better stories about underrepresented or marginalized groups is valuable and necessary for news organizations, but provide journalists with insights and methods for how to improve their reporting on people and places that newsrooms often fail to cover. 

     

    Salon K/L

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Saturday - #4)

    Speaker: Dave Savini of CBS/WBBM Chicago

    **Moderated by Dave Savini, CBS2Chicago

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Saturday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. Friday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Hands-on

    Using Fusion Tables

    Speaker: Joe Yerardi of The Center for Public Integrity

    Did you ever have your hands on a dataset that just cried out to be displayed as a map but thought you needed to be a coding wizard to make it happen? Then come to this session to learn how to make maps using Google Fusion Tables. Fusion Tables is a free service from Google that offers journalists a point-and-click interface for quickly and easily building interactive maps that can be embedded on almost any webpage, no coding knowledge required.

    This session is good for those with some experience working with data in Microsoft Excel. Attendees should come to the session already signed up for a free Google account.

    Room 402

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Hidden cameras

    Speakers: Josh Underwood-Davis of NBC4 Los Angeles; Joe Ellis of KVUE/ABC Austin; Kevin Nious of WNBC New York City

    Award winning producers from local and national broadcast news outlets discuss strategies for planning and executing undercover investigations. Learn best practices and see examples of ways to covertly use affordable consumer grade cameras and professional hidden cameras.

     

    Franklin 9&10

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Data deep dives: Philip Meyer Award winners

    Speakers: David Donald of Investigative Reporting Workshop-American University; Michael Grabell of ProPublica; Ryan McNeill of Reuters; Joseph Neff of The Marshall Project

    **Moderated by Joseph Neff, The News & Observer

    The winners of the Philip Meyer Award take you behind the scenes and offer insights, tips and strategies that helped them pull off their award-winning work. These projects uncovered how the medical injuries over-bills elderly patients to the tune of billions of dollars, the dangers that temporary workers face and the risks of rising ocean levels.

     

    Salon K/L

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Public debt

    Speaker: Cezary Podkul of The Wall Street Journal

    Curious about covering your local and state and government borrowing but don't know how to get started? Join this hands-on session to get a technical overview of how to analyze bond offering statements: How to find them, what the numbers mean, how to identify the key terms and conditions and scale-up your reporting using public and private data sources. We will walk you through several offering statements, including some toxic bond issues from the past, and teach participants how to develop a basic framework for finding data they need to track local borrowing. Topics covered will include: navigating the EMMA database, finding and reading official statements, using CUSIP identifiers to track debt, find credit ratings, ongoing disclosures, and calculating and benchmarking borrowing costs, and capital appreciation bonds (CABs).

     

    Room 402

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Hands-on

    Investigations with DocumentCloud

    Speakers: Ted Han of DocumentCloud; Anthony DeBarros of The Wall Street Journal

    Get a hands-on tour of DocumentCloud and how to make the most of its search, annotation, collaboration and publishing tools for your next investigation. Plus, we'll offer up great examples of DocumentCloud in action in recent investigative reports and newsroom tools. 

    Room 401

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Pop-up panel: From Ferguson to Freddie Gray - Launching investigations amid breaking news

    As racially charged riots broke out in Ferguson, Mo., and Baltimore, reporters aggressively chased breaking news. But the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and The Baltimore Sun balanced that coverage with deeper investigations. The Sun broke stories on “rough rides” in police vans that left residents paralyzed, and on thousands of detainees who are denied medical care by police. The Post-Dispatch revealed racial imbalances in local police forces, and a municipal court system that often operates in secret. Suggested panelists: Mark Puente, investigative reporter at The Baltimore Sun; Doug Donovan, investigative reporter at The Baltimore Sun; Jeremy Kohler, investigative reporter at The St. Louis Post-Dispatch; moderator, Dave Rosenthal, Senior Editor for Investigations and Enterprise at The Baltimore Sun

     

     

    Franklin 1&2

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Pop-up panel: Getting your money's worth from census data

    Digging into census data can provide the depth needed in reporting on social trends such as persistent poverty, growing income inequality and neighborhood gentrification. Using published reports as a springboard, we'll see how working with spreadsheets, Google fusion tables and sites such as CensusReporter can expose the stories hidden beneath the census numbers. This session is a sequel to the Wednesday workshop, "Finding money stories in census data," sponsored by the Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism." The Saturday IRE session includes new material, but is accessible to all. Evan Wyloge, senior reporter at Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, will provide tips and analysis. In his current assignment and prior work as new media specialist at Arizona Capitol Times, he has specialized in data analysis. He holds college degrees in journalism and political science.

    Franklin 5&6

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Pop-up panel: Periscope for journalism

    The sudden popularity of live-streaming mobile video applications has been creating new possibilities for journalists. But once again, the emerging platforms present a new set of ethical and legal complications.

    We will have a quick presentation of recent developments, a Periscope demonstration and then move quickly to audience questions. Expect lively conversation about the challenges and responsibilities of real-time mobile broadcasts.

    Speakers:

    Jim MacMillan manages the Center for Public Interest Journalism at Temple University. He’s a former photojournalist and journalism professor.

    Josh Cornfield is the New Jersey News Editor for The Associated Press. He works with a team devoted to finding and telling both breaking news stories and high-level enterprise.

    Susan Phillips covers energy and the environment for the multi-media public radio project StateImpact Pennsylvania. She holds duPont and Murrow awards and spent a year at MIT as a Knight Science Journalism Fellow.

    Salon G

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Pop-up panel: The worst day of my life

    What do you do when everything goes wrong and you have a bona fide disaster on your hands? A big, expensive project goes belly up; or worse, it airs with imperfections that bring shame and perhaps other severe repercussions down you and your organization. Investigative veterans share some of their horror stories and – more importantly – how they recovered; made things right, picked up the pieces and moved on.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell (Saturday - #5)

    Speaker: Fred Mamoun of Yale University

    **Moderated by Fred Mamoun, WNBC New York City

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Saturday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. Friday. For more information and to sign up, go here.

    Franklin 8

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Demo

    Surviving PDFs: Tools and techniques (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Ryann Grochowski Jones of ProPublica; Tom Torok of Camden Riversharks

    So much data comes to us in .pdf form or, worse, on paper that we then need to scan. We'll offer tips, tricks and best practices to quickly crack open those dastardly files and get the data in a usable format. We'll look at some of classic methods of breaking down PDFs and we'll discuss commercial software as well as docHive and Tabula, tools developed by fellow journalists that can help liberate data.

     

    Franklin 7

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Hands-on

    Twitter tricks and analytics

    Speaker: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR

    If you know the basics of Twitter, you're ready to ratchet up your skills. This hands-on session will take you to the next level: advanced Twitter searches, mining tweets by location, creative uses of Twitter lists (public and private), and apps/services that provide robust analytics. The payoff: better sources (particularly during breaking news) and a competitive edge in your market.

    Prerequisite: Please have an active Twitter account set up before the class.

    Room 404

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Using data to explore violence in Latin American Communities

    Speakers: Ricardo Alanis Tamez of Codeando México; Ana Arana of Fundacion MEPI; Claudia Nunez of Hoy Los Angeles; Ricardo Sandoval-Palos of InsideClimate News

    **Moderated by Ricardo Sandoval-Palos, NPR

    This panel will discuss the story of the battle of the Juarez and Sinaloa drug cartels and the co-option of police forces as fighters. Panelists will talk about the process they went through to build a story and the challenges of revisiting violence for local residents and the reporters themselves. They'll tell you how data elements of the story provided a visual timeline that helped reporters fully appreciate the gravity of that period in Juarez' history and also gave a summary of the story at a glance. This panel will also cover how to mine data to cover violence and threats faced by LGBT immigrants and refugees. It's all about using data to tell human stories and get beyond the Leads-if-it- Bleeds headlining.

     

    Room 414/415

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Membership Meeting

    Salon A/B & F

    6:00 pm - 6:30 pm

  • Special Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    6:30 pm - 6:30 pm

  • Membership Meeting

    Salon A/B & F

    6:45 pm - 7:00 pm

  • Reception

    Closing reception

    Join us for a closing reception from 7 - 8:30 p.m. and enjoy one last evening of catching up with old and new friends, speakers and colleagues.  

    Hors d' oeuvres and a cash bar will be available. Conference name tags are required for entry.

     

    Salon C-D, E

    7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Sunday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.  Sales will be located on the 4th floor of the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown.

    Franklin Hall Foyer

    8:30 am - 10:30 am

  • Hands-on

    Advanced Excel functions (repeat session)

    Speaker: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    Learn about advanced tricks in Excel that will blow your mind and give you control over your data like never before. Is the government giving you dirty records, or hassling you about how they are formatted? Do you wish there was a column that told you "X" and find yourself manually typing it in?  Never again!  Learn ways to free yourself from such trivial restraints and work your magic over columns and rows like a pro.

     

    Room 401

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Data and docs

    Speaker: Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    Move beyond anecdotes and he-said, she-said journalism with data and documents. Advice on developing a documents state of mind, navigating public records, understanding records retention schedules, exploring key records on a variety of beats, and becoming familiar with key data sets to produce high-impact local stories.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    Get the IRE edge

    Speakers: Lauren Grandestaff of IRE and NICAR; Alex Richards of NerdWallet; Sarah Hutchins of IRE and NICAR

    You've likely heard a journalist (or two) at this conference say that they wouldn't be where they were today without IRE. Come to this session to learn how to use your IRE membership to help your reporting stand out from the pack. From audio to tipsheets and more, we've got you covered. Also learn about how IRE and NICAR staff can help you analyze data for your next sweeps story or major project.

     

    Franklin 7

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    The Web for investigators

    Speaker: Mark Horvit of University of Missouri

    What reporters and editors need to know. From better search techniques to the invisible Web, how to find documents and databases on deadline and where to find reliable websites for enterprise stories. The craft of better searching and not wasting time. Handling issues of credibility and ethics online.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Web scraping for anyone (repeat session)

    Speaker: Matt Wynn of USA TODAY Network

    You don't have to write code to coax data off the web - with some clicks and tricks and elbow grease, you can get data and documents even your sources don't want you to have. We'll cover tools you can use out of the box, more advanced techniques, plus secret Internet passageways to the data you want.

     

    Room 404

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Whose truth? Evaluate experts, recognize junk, tell better science & environmental stories

    Speaker: Elissa Yancey of University of Cincinnati

    Want to find new ways to make your audience hungry for science and environmental stories? Then come to a three-hour workshop that helps you sift through the science and the anti-science and gives you practical ideas to help you ramp up your science and environmental storytelling.

    We will examine the relevance of science and environmental journalism in your reporting world, see how the same scientific study can be spun by different sources and explore how to find the most appropriate balance of sources that will boost your stories’ impact.

    Do you shy away from stories about science? Worry about making global climate stories fit with local coverage? Struggle with making your audience care about big science and environmental topics? Come to this session to for tips, best practices and advice, plus an open forum for discussion and analysis.

    Franklin 9&10

    9:00 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Career roundtable

    Speakers: David Cay Johnston of DCReport; Ellen Gabler of The New York Times; Manny Garcia of USA TODAY Network; Josh Meyer of POLITICO; Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV; Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area; Nicole Vap of KUSA/9News Denver; Mark Horvit of University of Missouri

    **Moderated by Mark Horvit, IRE/NICAR

    Looking for advice on how to take the next step in your career? Get practical tips from panelists who will talk about their own experiences and discuss what employers are looking for.

    Franklin 1&2

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Hands-on

    Cleaning up data with OpenRefine (repeat session)

    Speaker: Denise Malan of IRE and NICAR

    Learn to take filthy, stinking, messy data from an unhelpful government agency and transform it into something useful with the help of OpenRefine. If you often have to scrub and standardize huge spreadsheets, but you haven't delved into regular expressions, this program will change your life.

    This session will be most useful if: You have some experience working with data in columns and rows, in spreadsheets or database managers.

    Room 404

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Demo

    DocumentCloud: Examples and suggestions (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Anthony DeBarros of The Wall Street Journal; Ted Han of DocumentCloud

    Are you a DocumentCloud power user or interested in some of the deeper features of the platform, such as its API, responsive embeds and new WordPress support? This informal session is designed to answer your questions and let us hear from you on features you'd like to see in the platform.

     

    Franklin 7

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Workplace safety

    Speaker: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters

    In this hands-on session we'll explore online, searchable data to help you dig into workplace safety. You’ll come away with plenty of ideas for stories you can do in your own community. Experience with spreadsheets is helpful but not necessary.

     

    Room 401

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Using hypotheses: The core of investigative method

    Speaker: Luuk Sengers of Story-Based Inquiry Associates

    In Story-Based Inquiry, an investigation begins with a hypothesis. This is an answer to the question “What do you think that happened?” In this session participants will learn to explore possible story angles, and to rephrase them as concrete events that can be verified. Knowing what you are looking for increases your chances of discovering it. A hypothesis also makes it easier to co-operate in a team and to “sell” an idea to editors or clients.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Hands-on

    Command line fundamentals for journalists

    Speaker: Alex Richards of NerdWallet

    In this session, we’ll take a tour of your computer’s command line, covering some basic ways to put it to work for you. While the session will be based in a Mac lab, we’ll also talk about how to make the most of similar setups on other systems. 

     

    Room 404

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating fraud

    Speaker: Roddy Boyd of Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation

    Proving corporate fraud is usually the work of a judge and jury but the indicators of looming migraines, especially for publicly traded companies, are almost always found in "plain sight," within the public legal and financial filings. Armed with nearly unimpeachable source documents--i.e. what corporate executives have personally signed off on--your reporting on publicly traded companies can be instantly transformed into something much deeper and relevant.

     

    Franklin 1&2

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Hands-on

    Liberating data from PDFs (repeat session)

    Speaker: David Herzog of IRE and NICAR

    Want to stick it to government bureaucrats that think they'll foil your investigation by turning over public data in PDFs? Show them who's boss by turning nasty PDFs into usable data. This session is good for PDF newbies.

     

    Room 401

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Mastering timelines: The royal road to a successful project

    Speaker: Luuk Sengers of Story-Based Inquiry Associates

    In Story-Based Inquiry, the hypothesis accounts for the principal event. But something must have happened first, to make that event possible. And after the event occurs, there will be further events and consequences. In this session participants will learn how to use their imaginations to construct a hypothetical chain of events (timeline or scenario), which can be used to guide investigators toward sources and documents with a high degree of accuracy.

     

    Franklin 3&4

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm