Schedule details

  • Panel

    Welcome first-timers: Get a button and conference tips

    Speakers: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR; Denise Malan of IRE and NICAR

    Welcome to the conference! Get a special button for first-time attendees and hear from IRE staff about tips and tactics to navigate our conference like a pro. Also, you'll learn about key resources that IRE offers once you're back home.

    Crystal AB

    8:30 am - 8:50 am

  • Outside Event

    Preparing data for analysis with Tableau Prep (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Scott Teal of Tableau Software

    Getting data in a useful form can be a complicated and time-consuming process, often requiring specialized skills. Tableau Prep has customized visual experiences to make common yet complex tasks simple. We'll teach you how to:

    • *Connect to Excel files and other data
    • *Perform a pivot, aggregation, join, and union
    • *Group and replace values by pronunciation and common characters
    • *Export data into Tableau Public for visualization

    Some experience with Tableau is recommended but not required. Attending one of the earlier Tableau sessions should suffice. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class.  Limited seats are available.  There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Coral A

    9:00 am - 10:30 am

  • Demo

    Better journalism through memory: The Wayback Machine and the history of the Web (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Mark Graham of Internet Archive

    As numerous events over the past year have demonstrated the usefulness and importance of the web and other digital media archives, and the Wayback Machine, in particular, is growing.

    Mark Graham will explain these topics and provide real-world examples of various ways journalists and investigators can use the Wayback Machine to help answer questions and gather evidence to back-up claims. Participants will gain actionable experience they can immediately apply to their jobs. At the same time, we will collectively explore new services the Internet Archive might explore and develop, to advance our mission of helping to make the Web more useful and reliable. In addition, we will explore how the Internet Archive's TV News archive can help journalists by giving them the ability to interface with video as data, and conduct research and analysis that was so difficult it was nearly impossible just two years ago. 

    Oceans 9-10

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Thursday #1 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Patti Dennis of TEGNA Inc.

    **Moderated by Patti Dennis, TEGNA Inc.

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Best of broadcast (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speaker: Lee Zurik of WVUE-New Orleans

    Watch and listen as the photographers, editors, reporters and producers behind this year’s IRE Award winners and finalists explain how they did it, what they would do differently and what they were really thinking when things got hard.

    Crystal C

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Excel 1: Getting started

    Speaker: James Pilcher of The Cincinnati Enquirer

    In this introduction to spreadsheets, you'll begin analyzing data with Excel, a simple but powerful tool. You'll learn how to enter data, sort it, filter it and conduct simple calculations like sum, average and median.

    This session is good for: Data beginners.

    Coral B

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Investigating wildlife issues

    Speakers: Rachael Bale of National Geographic; Rene Ebersole of National Geographic; Lee van der Voo of independent journalist

    Covering wildlife isn't just for animal lovers. These are stories about crime, sustainability, community and economic development, politics, and big money too. Reporters will explain how they investigated the seafood industry, alligator poaching in Florida, and the international illegal wildlife trade, among others. The panel will focus on how and where to find sources, public records and datasets, story ideas that you can pursue in your own community, and how to tell these stories in a way that anyone — even people who aren't particularly interested in animal issues — will find compelling.

    Oceans 3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • IRE Commons - How to Report for America

    Speakers: Molly Born of West Virginia Public Broadcasting; Charles Sennott of Report for America; Maggie Messitt of Report for America; Harvey Parson of Mississippi Today

    A new national service model for journalism is helping news organizations cover underserved communities by sharing the cost of hiring new reporters. This session will feature a conversation with Report for America corps members, editors and staff about how the program works, the impact it's making already and how journalists can get involved. Attendees will hear stories from the field in Appalachia, our first region, and be invited to participate in a discussion about how local journalism builds relationships between journalists and their communities, improving the lives of residents and increasing trust in the press. The initiative is supported by Google News Lab, Knight Foundation and The Lenfest Institute for Journalism in partnership with The Emma Bowen Foundation, Maynard Institute and Solutions Journalism Network.

    Veiltail

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Workshop

    Legal workshop: Understanding libel and copyright (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: George Freeman of Media Law Resource Center; Jeff Hermes of Media Law Resource Center; Carol LoCicero of Thomas & LoCicero PL; Rachel Fugate of Shullman Fugate PLLC

    This three-hour workshop hosted by the Media Law Resource Center will go in-depth on two major areas of media law. Attendees are encouraged to participate in both sessions. Pre-registration is not required, but seats are limited in this workshop.

    Libel and invasion of privacy (9 - 10:30 a.m.)

    This workshop will focus on the legal problems which can arise from your content: How can you avoid getting sued for defamation and invasion of privacy? We'll discuss what the plaintiff has to prove to make out a libel case, your common law and constitutional defenses, the differences in defending cases brought by public and private figures, privileges for opinion and using public records, and the effect of corrections, denials, libelous implications and using anonymous sources. Lawsuits for publishing truthful but embarrassing private facts will also be considered. Discussion leaders: George Freeman, Media Law Resource Center; and Carol LoCicero, Thomas & LoCicero

    Copyright and digital media (11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.)

    This workshop will cover hot issues in copyright and the law of digital media. We will start with a consideration of copyright law; just because something is on the internet does not mean it’s free for the taking. What is copyrightable, the fair use of newsworthy information and embedding and aggregation of content will all be discussed. We will also talk about ways in which the law treats online speech differently from traditional media, including the ramifications of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act and the role of social media platforms. Discussion leader: Jeff Hermes, Media Law Resource Center; and Rachel Fugate, Shullman Fugate

    Mako

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: Investigating healthcare in your town and across the country

    Speakers: Rebekah Allen of The Dallas Morning News; Mike Baker of The Seattle Times; Ellen Gabler of The New York Times; Christina Jewett of Kaiser Health News

    Healthcare is ripe with stories but also ripe with reporting roadblocks. We will talk about how to get the story even if everyone is citing HIPAA. Learn about where to turn for documents and data, how find people who have been harmed and spotting when political influence is affecting health policy.

    Crystal AB

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Radio deep dives

    Speakers: Nicole Beemsterboer of NPR; Alex Hall of KQED Public Radio; Tony Schick of Oregon Public Broadcasting

    A deep dive into how some of the biggest radio stories of the year came to fruition. 

     

    Crystal E

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Simple online mapping

    Speaker: Rachel Iacovone of WGCU Public Media

    You're working on a story and your boss wants a map to go online. Learn how to build a map using a free online tool that can then be embedded in most website CMS. You'll learn about properly formatting addresses and creating maps that can be updated easily as the story changes.

    This session is good for: Anyone familiar with data basics. No previous mapping experience required.

    Coral C

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Technology and Tools Track: Emerging tools for investigative journalists

    Speakers: Meredith Broussard of New York University; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University; Nicholas Whitaker of Google News Lab

    These days, staying up to date on new tools and separating reality from science fiction can feel like a full-time job… on top of everything else we have to do. We will walk through what emerging tools we’re using and excited about, why it’s worth making the case for experimentation, even in a small newsroom, and how to incorporate new tools into your reporting, your newsroom and your audience experience.

    Oceans 6-8

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Work Better Track: How to learn from a fail

    Speakers: Ziva Branstetter of The Washington Post; Tyler Dukes of WRAL-Raleigh; Adam Playford of Tampa Bay Times

    Investigative work is often complex, detail-oriented and executed over weeks or months. Without a system in place to prevent errors along the way, these factors that can contribute to mistakes in your final product and undermine your impact. To guard against errors, you'll need to take concrete steps to ensure accuracy during every step of the reporting process. We'll show you our tried and true methods — including document corroboration, source vetting, script footnoting and final accuracy checks — for inoculating stories from errors. And because mistakes do happen, we'll detail what we've learned from our own missteps and discuss how to respond responsibly and with transparency. 

    Oceans 5-7

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Year in investigations

    Speakers: Sarah Hutchins of IRE and NICAR; Mark Walker of The New York Times

    Pick up some story ideas and get inspired by some of the year's best investigations.

    Oceans 4

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Afflicting the comfortable

    Speakers: Nancy Amons of WSMV-Nashville; Sammy Roth of The Desert Sun; Matt Hamilton of Los Angeles Times

    A journalist's mission is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. And while reporters often focus on the failure of institutions, powerful individuals are ultimately the responsible parties. So how do we hold the powerful accountable? Four panelists give their tips on how best to approach people on lofty perches, get them to talk, and bulletproof our stories about them.

    Crystal AB

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Behind the story: Schools without rules

    Speakers: Leslie Postal of Orlando Sentinel; Anne Martin of Orlando Sentinel; Beth Kassab of Orlando Sentinel

    Three Orlando Sentinel reporters spent six-months investigating Florida’s scholarship programs, which will send nearly $1 billion to private schools this year. The project meant reviewing thousands of pages of documents and making in-person visits to dozens of private schools. The reporters discovered soon-to-be evicted schools set up in rundown buildings, campuses where teachers lacked college degrees, and a principal under investigation for child molestation who was able to keep taking Florida vouchers by closing one school and then opening another under a new name.

    This behind-the-story session will go through how reporters handled the school visits (most were unannounced), how they requested and organized data (from enrollment numbers to parent complaints sent to the state) and searched for other needed information. They’ll also cover what worked, and what didn’t, as they tried to stay organized while still doing other stories on their beats.

    Oceans 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Thursday #2 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Jeff Harris of WEWS-Cleveland

    **Moderated by Jeff Harris, WEWS-Cleveland

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: State of the industry (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Mark Greenblatt of Scripps Washington Bureau; Ellen Crooke of TEGNA Inc.; Pat LaPlatney of Raycom Media; Karen Rundlet of Knight Foundation

    **Moderated by Mark Greenblatt

    On this panel, top executives gather for a rare and candid discussion about where investigative reporting is headed next. Hear from a CEO of a major station group as he talks about the need to invest in and support investigative content. He'll also field questions about the realities of our industry's changing business model and talk about the opportunities he sees for long-form content in a digital world. A senior executive at another major station group will explain her company's focus on innovation surrounding investigations while highlighting examples of experimentation with data storytelling. And the director of journalism for a major non-profit foundation addresses the new evidence and data now emerging that speaks to the increasing importance and influence local TV stations play in their communities while using that data to talk about where companies and non-profits should be investing next. 

    Crystal C

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Consumer investigations: Stories that make a difference

    Speakers: Robert Benincasa of NPR; Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV; Lea Thompson of independent journalist

    Investigating doctors, drugs, hospitals, dangerous products, water, chemicals, consumer goods and services, banks, transportation, fraudsters, scammers, schemers and just bad deals — we’ll give you the tips and tools you need to do it big with substance and style, even in this political climate. We've got your back whether you have six months or just a few days to do a story.

    Oceans 4

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Covering natural disasters: Breaking news and beyond

    Speakers: Matt Dempsey of Houston Chronicle; Rong-Gong Lin of Los Angeles Times; Carla Minet of Centro de Periodismo Investigativo de Puerto Rico

    When disaster strikes, will you be ready? How can you prepare before it hits? How do you manage the chaos in real time? What are some ways you can come out of the disaster with strong stories lined up explaining it all? 

    This session will offer proven tips on where to get data, records, sources and story ideas from journalists who lived through it all.

    Oceans 5-7

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Crooked cops and crime labs

    Speakers: Melissa Segura of BuzzFeed News; Ryan Gabrielson of ProPublica; Ted Gest of Criminal Justice Journalists; Mark Fazlollah of The Philadelphia Inquirer

    Serious cases of corrupt police officers continue to pop up nationwide, from a Chicago detective accused of framing more than 50 people for murder charges to a secret list of Philadelphia officers who prosecutors won't call as witnesses because of a history of false testimony or other legal problems. At the same time, there are serious doubts about the validity of certain forensic evidence types such as hair fiber, and about the results of unreliable crime lab tests that are cited in court. We'll discuss how to find these cases, what experts to consult, and what records to request.

    Crystal E

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Excel 2: Using formulas for stories

    Speaker: John Schoen of CNBC Digital

    Much of Excel's power comes in the form of formulas. In this class, you'll learn how to use them to analyze data with the eye of a journalist. Yes, math will be involved, but it's totally worth it! This class will show you how calculations like change, percent change, rates and ratios can beef up your reporting.

    This session is good for: Anyone who is comfortable navigating Excel.

    Coral B

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to R 1

    Speaker: Ronald Campbell of NBC Owned Television Stations

    Give a statistical lift to your reporting with R, the powerful, open-source programming language. This session will cover R basics in a fast-paced tour of Florida data. You will learn how to import, organize and analyze information with R.

    This session is good for: People comfortable with coding, people with basic data knowledge.

    Coral C

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • IRE Commons - Public Records Track: A conversation on how to build a beat on public records (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speaker: Hilary Niles of independent journalist

    The right to access public records is more than a tool for journalism. It’s a critical public policy for business, law, free expression and private citizenship in a democracy. Come learn how to build a beat covering access to public records, much the way journalists are already accustomed to covering access to education or access to health care. Panelists will share a range of experiences with this work, a roster of resources for reporters and editors who need to get up to speed on the topic, and a tipsheet offering best practices for how to ethically cover a topic that is also critical to our own profession. 

    Veiltail

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Local watchdog showcase

    Speakers: Joey Cranney of The Post and Courier; Brett Murphy of USA TODAY Network; Katie Shepherd of Willamette Week

    Learn new and old reporting tricks as the team from the Local Matters newsletter highlights a recent selection of great local watchdog journalism. Hear firsthand presentations by local reporters from across the country on how to expose wrongdoing in your community.​

    Oceans 6-8

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    Technology and Tools Track: Free Google tools for deep reporting, analysis and visualization (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Nicholas Whitaker of Google News Lab

    Learn the latest tricks and tips for tools such as Google Search, Google Sheets and Google Maps, as well as new tools like Cloud Data Studio and Cloud Dataprep. You'll leave equipped with new skills you can put to work the moment you return to the newsroom or classroom. No previous knowledge required!

    Oceans 9-10

    10:15 am - 12:30 pm

  • Outside Event

    Interactive data graphics in Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Scott Teal of Tableau Software

    Learn how to create beautiful, interactive data visualizations on short deadlines. No programming required. You'll learn everything you need to build data visualizations and publish them to your website just like a video. We'll teach you how to:

    • *Connect to Excel files and other data
    • *Create maps and charts
    • *Make them interactive
    • *Publish them on your site

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. No previous experience with Tableau is necessary to take this class.Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class.  Limited seats are available.  There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Coral A

    11:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Thursday #3 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Lisa R. Cohen of Columbia Journalism School

    **Moderated by Lisa Cohen, Columbia Journalism School

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Art of the interview (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Danielle Leigh of ABC7 New York/WABC; Scott Zamost of CNBC; Scott Friedman of KXAS/NBC5 Dallas-Fort Worth

    Seasoned broadcast journalists break down what makes on-camera interviews successful. Learn proven strategies to prep for interviews, approach reluctant subjects, handle tough situations, navigate ethical trouble-spots and more.

    Crystal C

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Diversity Track: Investigating inequality

    Speakers: Nicole Dungca of The Boston Globe; Emmanuel Martinez of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Meghan Irons of The Boston Globe

    Hear from journalists on the front lines of investigating racial and other inequities. Get story ideas as well as reporting and writing tips, along with advice on how best to frame stories in the proper historical context. Relevant public records and data sets also will be discussed.

    Oceans 6-8

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Election & Politics Track: Trumping norms: Tracking the Trump Administration’s conflicts of interest

    Speakers: Derek Kravitz of ProPublica; Andrew Lehren of NBC News; Charles Lewis of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Clare Malone of FiveThirtyEight

    Generally, most U.S. Presidents do not ensconce their daughter and son-in-law in White House West Wing offices, nor lease and operate a posh hotel bearing their name just a block from the White House, nor refuse to publicly release their tax returns unlike all other previously-elected presidents since the Watergate scandal. Donald J. Trump has flouted many of the ethical mores of past presidents, including even such basics as facts and truth, according to the Washington Post uttering 3,000 false or misleading statements in just his first 16 months in office. All of which makes tracking the Trump administration’s conflicts of interest and other ethics-related issues an excellent adventure for any reporter and news organization. Meanwhile, public trust in government remains near historic lows in the United States.

    Oceans 3

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Excel 3: Filtering and pivot tables

    Speaker: Nick Penzenstadler of USA TODAY Network

    A look at spreadsheet filtering and the awesome power of pivot — and how to use it to analyze your dataset in minutes rather than hours.

    This session is good for: Anyone familiar with formulas, sorting and other basic tasks in Excel or another spreadsheet program.

    Coral B

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to R 2: Throw away your database software

    Speaker: T. Christian Miller of ProPublica

    R is a powerhouse tool for every occasion. In this session, we examine how it can be used as a database engine like MySQL or Access. This session will cover the basics of how to use R to organize, query and join data tables. This intermediate session will be linked with Intro to R and use the same Florida data as Intro to R. If all goes well, you will leave with a better understanding of R through the use of a particular database package.

    This session is good for: People with some knowledge of R and SQL database programs.

    Coral C

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating worker exploitation

    Speakers: Brett Murphy of USA TODAY Network; Shoshana Walter of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Peggy Lowe of Harvest Public Media

    Mistreatment and abuse of workers happen in foreign lands as well as America's heartland — and a shocking number of points in between. Stories may be hiding in plain sight in your communities behind factory walls, in farm fields and even in tractor-trailer trucks. Learn how to expose worker exploitation, make readers care and spark reforms. 

    Crystal E

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • IRE Commons - Fellowships & grants for freelancers (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speakers: Brant Houston of University of Illinois; Esther Kaplan of The Investigative Fund; Jane Sasseen of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism; Cheryl W. Thompson of NPR; Laird Townsend of Freelance Investigative Reporters and Editors (FIRE)

    Leaders from organizations that give grants to freelancers will explain what kinds of stories they are looking for and what you need to do to successfully apply for a grant. This will be a robust question and answer session.

    Veiltail

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Public Records Track: 50 records to request right now

    Speakers: Kelly Hinchcliffe of WRAL-Raleigh; Todd Wallack of The Boston Globe

    Get your FOI templates ready to roll. In this quick-paced, lightning-round style session, two investigative reporters and public records geeks will cover their favorite, most unique, overlooked and under-appreciated records to request from all levels of government. They'll also give examples of how these records were used to produce stories in newsrooms around the country.

    Oceans 5-7

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Turning your investigation into a book

    Speakers: Blake Ellis of CNN; Melanie Hicken of CNN; Mary Shanklin of Fifth Estate Media; Mark Schlabach of ESPN

    Non-fiction book writing is a creatively satisfying way of taking your investigative project to the next level, and to a potentially global audience. It‘s a great way to make use of all that research and reporting you did for your project that didn’t “make it in.” And it’s one of the last bastions of in-depth investigative reporting, especially for those not still working for large mainstream media outlets. Even though bookstores are closing, there are many exciting opportunities on publishing’s digital frontier. These published author/journalists share their best advice, and offer lessons learned and cautionary tales.

    Oceans 4

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Work Better Track: One journalist, multiple hats

    Speakers: Jake Bleiberg of The Associated Press; Jamie Grey of InvestigateTV; Kristin Hussey of independent journalist

    As some newsrooms shrink, folks may be taking on two or three roles that would otherwise demand two or three separate full-time staffers. What tools can you use to make your job easier? How can you quickly be your own quality graphic artist and photographer/videographer? How can you prioritize your days and weeks to knock out the most work? How do you quickly pick up new beats and keep track of…. everything? We’ll give you our tips from experience and share tools you can take home.

    Crystal AB

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Outside Event

    How to publish interactive maps with Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Ben Jones of Tableau Software

    Maps are where it’s at, and with the addition of spatial file support you can viz outside the box too. In this session you will learn different methods for building maps in Tableau Public. We will teach you how to:

    • *Determine what kind of mapping data you’re looking at
    • *Take advantage of spatial file support in Tableau Public
    • *Beautify maps with built-in and Mapbox-supported backgrounds
    • *Integrate maps into your dashboards
    • *Utilize design and layout best practices to make sure that your visualization looks polished and professional

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. Some familiarity with the product is recommended; a beginner session earlier in the day should prepare you enough for this session. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class.  Limited seats are available.  There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Coral A

    1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

  • IRE Board of Directors Meeting

    IRE Board Meeting

    The IRE Board of Directors will meet on Thursday from 2-5 p.m. in Zander, located on the 2nd floor of the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld, as part of the annual conference. The meeting is open to all IRE members.

    Zander

    2:00 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Workshop

    Master class: Mastering the interview (Print focus) **pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Ken Armstrong of ProPublica

    When it comes to interviewing, some reporters are naturals. ProPublica’s Ken Armstrong isn’t one of them. He’ll share the (many) mistakes he’s made and what he’s learned from them. This workshop will move from getting the interview, to conducting the interview, to capitalizing on the interview when it’s time to write.

    
Topics will include:
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    *How — and when — to land a tough interview
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    *The power of silence
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    *The power of sincerity
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    *Interviewing people who have been hurt, and interviewing the people who hurt them
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    *How to interview someone who won’t talk to you (and yes, this can be done — sort of)

    We will venture, ever so briefly, into the mysterious realm of emotions (open mind, open heart). We’ll challenge some of the conventional wisdom surrounding interviewing (pure hooey, some of it). And we’ll watch outstanding interviewers at work, studying what they do — and, more important, what they don’t do.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Mako

    2:30 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Deep dive 1 (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Eric Flack of WUSA9 Washington; Daralene Jones of WFTV-Orlando; Duane Pohlman of Sinclair Broadcast Group

    A deep dive into how some of the biggest stories of the year came to fruition

    Crystal C

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Don't bore me!

    Speaker: Al Tompkins of Poynter

    You have the facts, you know the story better than anyone, you know in your bones your investigation matters. Now, you have to make ME the viewer/reader/listener and your bosses care.

    Veteran journalist and trainer, Al Tompkins, will show you eight key “motivators” that you can use to solidly connect any story with the public. 

    You can have all the fancy graphics, interactives and chasing-bad-guys-down-the-hall video you want but unless you connect with the public ... it’s just noise.

    Oceans 6-8

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Finding immigration stories in data about communities and people

    Speakers: Tim Henderson of The Pew Charitable Trusts; Paul Overberg of The Wall Street Journal

    Covering immigration is more than raids and rallies and restaurants. As the share of immigrant Americans nears record levels, it's finding stories about how immigrants change once here, and how they change the people and places around them. It's also knowing how to knock down myths and fears with facts. Learn how reporters use Census and other demographic data to cover immigration and how it's changing your community.

    Crystal E

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • IRE Commons - A field guide to attracting and retaining a news nerd (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speaker: Matt Dempsey of Houston Chronicle

    A camera pans around the newsroom. (Narrator): This is our world. It's home to a vast variety of journalists. One of the most intriguing species is the modern news nerd. Here we can see a young example, diligently pecking away its keyboard, building a beautiful, interactive home for a story. Ahh yes and here's another one now, toiling away at its database, finding hidden gems in the columns and rows. But how does one attract a news nerd to a newsroom? And once you have one, how do you make sure it doesn't fly away to a different newsroom or leave the world of journalism altogether?

    Nerds and non-nerds alike are welcome to this discussion on how to develop, reward and keep journalists with data skills. What are some best practices? What are some pitfalls to avoid? Share your experience and let's create an environment for news nerds to thrive. 

    Veiltail

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Mass shooting “contagion” and media coverage: Minimizing the risks

    Speakers: Lisa Cianci of Orlando Sentinel; Dawn Clapperton of NBC6 Miami; Adam Lankford of The University of Alabama; Katherine Reed of Missouri School of Journalism

    A growing body of research provides evidence of a disturbing problem: Extensive coverage of mass shootings is a factor in the increasing lethality of these incidents, and it appears to encourage some copycats who crave widespread attention and even fame. Social media sharing of content related to mass shootings, the people who commit them, their names, images, and “manifestos” also seems to increase the likelihood of subsequent mass shootings. Meanwhile, the news media have a responsibility to bear witness to events of public interest and attempt to make sense of the seemingly senseless, hold institutions (including their own) accountable for failures, and examine the psychological and social factors that might help predict and prevent mass shootings. How can the news media do their job while minimizing the potential harms of their coverage? What guidance does the research provide?

    Oceans 5-7

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: The data sets every government reporter should have

    Speakers: Mark Greenblatt of Scripps Washington Bureau; Jennifer Peebles of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Claudia Vargas of The Philadelphia Inquirer

    Veteran data and government reporters team up to share a list of data sets that can give you a competitive edge in both breaking news and long-term investigations. Walk away from this panel with a wide-ranging list of local and national databases you can request or download immediately, along with related story ideas that will position you to lead coverage while holding governments of all levels accountable. Databases covered will include topics as diverse as payroll, pensions, settlements, vendor information, check registers, immigration courts, voter registration, licensed professionals, property tax, and much more.  

    Oceans 4

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Public Records Track: FOI Jedi moves: Psychological tactics to get public records and increase public support for FOI

    Speaker: David Cuillier of The University of Arizona

    Get the upper hand when you're persuading officials to cough up records by using some Jedi mind tricks -- aka psychological tactics based on social science research. This session will cover some tactics to try, along with messaging strategies to increase public support for FOI when writing stories and talking with citizens.

    Crystal AB

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Scraping without programming

    Speaker: Samantha Sunne of independent journalist

    Scraping is a technical word for a traditional idea: getting ahold of information, whether your sources want you to or not. In this case, the information is data and the sources are websites. We'll go over some out-of-the-box tools for scraping data, plus some DIY techniques that often work even better.

    Coral C

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    SQL 1: Intro and filtering

    Speaker: Pam Dempsey of The Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting

    Learning to manipulate data is a bit like learning a new language. Actually, it is a language, called structured query language (SQL). This session is an introduction to using SQL to zero in on your data by viewing slices and chunks of it and putting it into a useful order so you can spot the stuff you need to get started toward a story. We'll use SQLite and DB Browser, a free database manager.

    This session is good for: People with some experience working with data in columns and rows, in spreadsheets or database managers.

    Coral B

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Demo

    Technology and Tools Track: Online security for journalists (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Nicholas Whitaker of Google News Lab; Jamie Albers of Jigsaw

    Safety and security online are important for all users, but especially for journalists in the field conducting sensitive, difficult, and sometimes dangerous reporting.

    According to a recent study of more than 2,700 newsroom managers and journalists from 130 countries, at least half of those surveyed don’t use any tools or methods to protect their data and information online. Given the importance of journalism to open societies everywhere, it's important to ensure that newsrooms and journalists are equipped with the tools and training they need to be successful — and safe — while doing their work. 

    Attend this workshop to learn how to protect yourself and your news organization from hacking, phishing, malware, other digital attacks and censorship — for the upcoming election season and beyond. More info: https://goo.gl/h7wTX1

    *All attendees will receive a free hardware security key to help secure their digital communications, courtesy of Google and Jigsaw.

    Oceans 9-10

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Tunnel vision: Finding great stories about transportation

    Speakers: Scott Friedman of KXAS/NBC5 Dallas-Fort Worth; Laura Nelson of Los Angeles Times; Brian Rosenthal of The New York Times

    The subway, the highway, school buses, planes, trains and automobiles: Few beats affect as many people as transportation. And in 2018, when seemingly every week is "Infrastructure Week," the topic is more important than ever. Three reporters from different parts of the country share tips and tools for finding great stories in your community.

    Oceans 3

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Outside Event

    Designing Tableau visualizations for mobile (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Ben Jones of Tableau Software

    Are mobile readers of your news site becoming more and more common? If your news organization is like others we’ve worked with, the percent of readers using phones and tablets to read your content is well over half of the overall number, and growing fast. Creating data visualizations for these small form-factors is very challenging. Learn how to use Tableau to create sheets and dashboards that work great, even on phones and tablets. 

    • *Design considerations, including layout and formatting
    • *Dashboard sizing for a range of screen widths
    • *Interactivity – filtering and tooltips
    • *Options to embed visualizations to respond to reader device

    Some experience with Tableau Public is recommended. Taking one of the earlier Tableau sessions should suffice. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class.  Limited seats are available.  There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Coral A

    3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Thursday #4 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Chad Matthews of ABC7 New York/WABC

    **Moderated by Chad Matthews, WABC-New York

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Going undercover: Hidden cameras, methods and ethics (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Jeremy Jojola of KUSA/9News Denver; Job Rabkin of Channel 4 News; Diane Wilson of ABC11 WTVD

    Undercover filming is one of the most powerful tools available for television investigations. But how do you do undercover investigations? And when should you do them? In this session, teams from across the U.S. and abroad share their experiences and knowledge of the art of going undercover – and the tricks of the trade.

    Crystal C

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Cleaning data with OpenRefine

    Speaker: Martin Magdinier of OpenRefine

    We'll go over how to use OpenRefine for common data cleaning problems, such as parsing and cleaning names and addresses, combining and breaking apart fields and more as time allows. 

    This session is good for: People with at least some Excel experience.

    Coral C

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Covering hate in America (Sponsored by the Southern Poverty Law Center)

    Speakers: Rachel Glickhouse of ProPublica; Jerry Mitchell of Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting; Aaron Sankin; Natalie Allison of The Tennessean

    How can you effectively collect hate crimes data when law enforcement does such a bad job? What's the best way to cover white supremacy without giving white supremacists a platform? What are best practices for establishing contacts with hate groups and white supremacists? We'll provide insight and tips on how to tackle the hate beat.

    Oceans 5-7

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Freelance investigations

    Speakers: Samantha Sunne of independent journalist; Hilary Niles of independent journalist; Cat Ferguson of independent journalist; Mc Nelly Torres of independent journalist

    An investigator has to juggle more than the average reporter - long lead time, high expectations, a wide variety of tasks and deadlines (or sometimes worse, no deadlines). That's even more pronounced for freelancers. How do you know when you have a good enough investigation to pitch? How deep do you dive before you know you're getting paid? How do you build sources without a household name? A few freelance investigative reporters with experience in these areas will share their own tips and take questions from the audience - current or prospective freelancers welcome.

    Oceans 3

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    How to find, read and use 990s

    Speakers: Brad Racino of inewsource; Katie Rusnock Coughlin of Charity Navigator

    There are more than 1.5 million nonprofits spread across the U.S., including public charities, private foundations and other types such as chambers of commerce. These organizations are involved in a variety of industries including education, government, the environment, health and any other topic a typical reporter may cover in their day-to-day beat. Most nonprofits are required to file detailed statements — called 990s — that publicly disclose a large amount of information about the organization. 

    This session is designed to provide both novice and expert reporters with tips, strategies and context for navigating the world of nonprofits. 

    Panelists will:

    *Give an overview of how nonprofits work and are held accountable across the country

    *Explain how to find, read and use 990s

    *Highlight potential red flags within the paperwork

    *Discuss updates in the nonprofit industry over the past year, including new government initiatives and transparency tools for reporters

    Crystal AB

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • IRE Commons - Students' roundtable (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speakers: Alison Berg of Utah State University; Melissa Gomez of Los Angeles Times; Anna Brett of University of Missouri

    This is a roundtable for students to have an honest, off-the-record discussion on the challenges of being a student journalist. Some of the topics that might be brought up include: learning to set aside your personal biases, gaining access to data and documents, and backlash from your university for unfavorable coverage.

    Veiltail

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: Investigating access to higher education (Sponsored by Lumina Foundation)

    Speakers: Dan Bauman of The Chronicle of Higher Education; Kim Clark of Education Writers Association; Adam Harris of The Atlantic; Maria Perez of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    This session will point you to tips and key data sources for covering some of the most important topics in higher education today, including college affordability, student loans, socioeconomic diversity on campus, and undocumented and DACA students grappling to pay for college.

    Oceans 4

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Public Records Track: Insider secrets about your open records requests

    Speakers: Jill Eggleston of US Citizenship and Immigration Services; Patricia Gleason of ----0000 Institution Not Present 0000----; Sheela Portonovo of Office of Government Information Services (OGIS); Norberto Santana of Voice of OC

    Get a behind-the-scenes look at the discussions on the other side of your open records requests. Government officials who handle federal and state-level requests will talk about the common problems they see with requests and how journalists can better formulate requests to get better — and quicker — responses.

    Crystal E

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Pulling off big projects in small(er) newsrooms

    Speakers: Evan Wyloge of The Desert Sun; Emily Le Coz of GateHouse Media; Nate Morabito of WCNC-Charlotte

    Seeing amazing work being done by pioneers in our industry invigorates and inspires, but when we get back to our newsroom, reality can dampen our excitement. ‘We don’t have the budget’ or ‘We can’t let you take time away from your beat’ or ‘Nobody here even knows where to begin on that’ are common refrains in smaller newsrooms, and frequently mean your great idea is canned before it even has a chance. Alas, there are ways to hack these problems, offer creative solutions to your bosses and even make money for your organization with your idea. From finding developers who can work with you on a budget and structure the project, to gaining buy-in from higher-ups and finding revenue opportunities, this discussion will offer a framework for getting your big idea done.

    Oceans 6-8

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    SQL 2: Grouping and summing

    Speaker: Madi Alexander of The Dallas Morning News

    If you know how to write a basic SELECT statement in SQL but are looking to make calculations, then this is the session for you. Learn to count how many times certain records appear in a database, and sum totals across records. These skills can come in handy whether you're covering campaign finance or boating licenses. We'll use SQLite and DB Browser, a free database manager.

    This session will be most useful if: You took “SQL 1: Intro and filtering” or are familiar with “SELECT” and “WHERE” statements in SQL.

    Coral B

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Demo

    Under pressure: Real life in real time with breaking news (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area

    It’s become one of the hottest sessions at every IRE Conference. How would you and your newsroom fare in digging out little-known facts and information under the pressure of a breaking news deadline? One of the best ways to get better is to practice. 

    This is a real-life scenario where you can learn to break news without leaving your computer. The skills learned in this session can also be used for turning daily general assignment stories when there’s not breaking news. This session regularly fills up and the tipsheet that comes with it is in high demand. If you’re interested, get there early to get a seat.

    Oceans 9-10

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Thursday #5 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Jeff Harris of WEWS-Cleveland

    **Moderated by Jeff Harris, WEWS-Cleveland

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13.

    Crystal D

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: 60 ideas in 60 minutes (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Rachel DePompa of WWBT-Richmond; Joe Ellis of KVUE/ABC Austin

    Looking for story ideas? We’ve got 60 stories from broadcast investigative reporters that can be done in any market. You’ll walk away with a tipsheet full of ideas that can keep you busy for months. Come early and grab a seat. This panel is not to be missed.

    Crystal C

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Election & Politics Track: Prepping for the midterms

    Speakers: Edwin Bender of National Institute on Money in State Politics; Julie Bykowicz of The Wall Street Journal; Carrie Levine of The Center for Public Integrity; Andrew Perez of MapLight

    Practical advice and possible story angles as your newsroom gears up to cover the 2018 midterm elections. We'll help you understand different campaign fundraising avenues, find sources for data and turn it all into stories that help your audience know who they're voting for.

    Oceans 5-7

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to QGIS

    Speaker: Tim Henderson of The Pew Charitable Trusts

    Learn the basics of how to make maps with QGIS, including mapping, styling and analyzing data. 

    This session is good for: Anyone familiar with data basics. This class requires no prior experience with QGIS or mapping.

    Coral C

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • IRE Commons - Long-distance relationships: How to manage and collaborate with a remote staff (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speaker: Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    With nearly two decades of remote experience between us, we’ll discuss how to sell and maintain a remote journalism job. Let’s exchange ideas and tools that make it easier for journalists and managers to work effectively when they aren’t in the same physical space.

    Veiltail

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Looking for accountability on the recovery efforts in Puerto Rico

    Speakers: Carla Minet of Centro de Periodismo Investigativo de Puerto Rico; Frances Robles of The New York Times; Mc Nelly Torres of independent journalist; Luis Trelles of Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism

    Almost eight months after Hurricane María hit Puerto Rico, the recovery effort is moving slowly and much remains to be investigated. Many cities in Florida and around the country are also dealing with an influx of Puerto Ricans who left and have not returned home. Journalists covering the crisis in Puerto Rico will share investigative strategies and techniques as well as issues they faced while covering the crisis that followed the massive storm including health issues, the disputed death count after the hurricane, scandals with the subcontractors hired to repair the electrical grid, and the government lack of transparency. Panelists will also talk about where to look for data stories and provide journalists the tools they need to investigate after a natural disaster.

    This panel was planned in coordination with the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.

    Oceans 3

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Mike McGraw: Celebration of his life and legacy

    Speaker: Brant Houston of University of Illinois

    Join us for a celebration of the life and work of Mike McGraw, a long-time IRE member and leader and an award-winning journalist. There will be a short presentation on Mike's last project, plus memories shared by those who worked with him over his distinguished 40-plus-year career. Mike was the recipient of a Pulitzer Prize, IRE awards and many other honors. He served on the IRE board and the endowment committee and mentored countless journalists and students. The gathering also will serve as a fundraiser for a fellowship honoring Mike, who died in January.

    Raise a glass in Mike's honor (cash bar available).

    Crystal E

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Public Records Track: FOIA appeals and disputes (Sponsored by TEGNA Foundation)

    Speakers: Brad Heath of Reuters; Jason Leopold of BuzzFeed News; Christine Walz of Holland & Knight; Les Zaitz of Malheur Enterprise

    So you filed a FOIA and didn’t get what you wanted. Now what? We’ll walk you through the options for nudging, shaming, and maybe forcing the government to give you records under FOIA. When should you appeal, when should you go to court and when should you walk away? These panelists have tried it all and will walk you through the techniques that work.

    Oceans 6-8

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    SQL 3: Joining tables

    Speaker: Jennifer Peebles of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Learn how to join tables, matching information from one file to another. We'll use SQLite and DB Browser, a free database manager.

    This session is good for: People who are familiar with counting, summing or “GROUP BY” in SQL and want to add another tool to their SQL skill set.

    Coral B

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Storytelling Track: The nitty gritty, down & dirty truth about doing investigations for radio and podcasts

    Speakers: Jacob Ryan of Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting; Kameel Stanley of USA TODAY Network; Alain Stephens of inewsource

    The idea of mixing investigative reporting and audio storytelling isn’t new. But let’s face it, we could all level up. Whether you're interested in launching a multi-part series or producing a single episode, this session will help you learn how to turn your investigation into a compelling and successful audio story. We'll give you more than the basics, and spill our secrets about making documents come alive, scripting for the ear, gathering tape (even when you don’t get the interview), and above all, not leaving narratives behind.

    Crystal AB

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Demo

    Technology and Tools Track: The tools and apps every reporter should know (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Ren LaForme of Poynter; Samantha Sunne of independent journalist

    Some people say this is the best era to be a journalist - not because of the abundance of news, but because the Internet and other digital advances have made for faster, stronger, broader, and more efficient reporting. Come learn the highs, the lows and the how-tos of some of the best tools for journalism.

    Oceans 9-10

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Uncovering national security stories in your community

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Stephen Coll of Columbia Journalism School; Josh Meyer of POLITICO

    Once largely the domain of reporters in Washington and overseas, covering issues relating to national and global (and homeland) security is now truly something that reporters in every town in America can — and should — do. From terrorism and transnational organized crime and drug syndicates to huge government boondoggles in security expenditures to rampant violations of civil liberties, there are a million important stories to do. Panelists will discuss how to get sourced up; how to find, report on and write up the many great national stories; and how to tackle international stories with local connections.

    Oceans 4

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Reception

    Welcome reception (Sponsored by Google News Initiative)

    Kick off the conference with a welcome reception beginning at 6 p.m in the Atrium of the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld. Meet up with friends you have not seen since last year and welcome new attendees. Each attendee will receive one drink ticket for beer, wine, soda or bottled water. Conference nametags are required for entry.

    Atrium

    6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Oceans 11-12

    7:45 am - 8:45 am

  • Hands-on

    Digging into data for stories (Friday) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Charles Minshew of IRE and NICAR; Sarah Hutchins of IRE and NICAR; Denise Malan of IRE and NICAR; Mark Walker of The New York Times

    Skill level: Beginner

    Kickstart your data skills with IRE's original mini-boot camp. This series of hands-on classes will introduce you to spreadsheets with IRE's proven techniques. IRE's experienced trainers will start with the fundamentals of navigating spreadsheets and walk you through sorting, calculating and interviewing data in Microsoft Excel. You'll come away with a solid base for using data analysis in your own newsroom. In addition, we'll provide you with our boot camp materials to help keep you on track long after you leave the conference. Please note that a showcase panel will take place at 4:45 p.m. on Friday. Attendees may leave the Digging into data class to attend the showcase or stay for an optional additional lesson.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.


    Workshop prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this workshop and beginners are welcome. This workshop is good for those wanting to get started analyzing data for stories.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Coral C

    9:00 am - 5:45 pm

  • Workshop

    Master class: Editing the data story **pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Maud Beelman of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    Managing a data project presents challenges for any editor. No matter your comfort level with data, this half-day workshop will give you the foundation you need to help make sure your reporters aren't running with scissors or spinning their wheels on data projects. Two veteran editors, Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop and Maud Beelman of the Associated Press, will guide you through the ins and outs of data journalism from an editor's point of view, including:

    *How to help reporters find focus for their data stories

    *Being skeptical of data and finding potential pitfalls

    *Verifying analyses and bulletproofing data stories and apps

    *Using data to find human sources and characters for stories

    *Planning the best data workflows for your newsroom

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited.

    Workshop requirements: No data experience is necessary for this workshop. Editors/producers and those interested in newsroom management are welcome. Please bring your own laptop.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Mako

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Friday #1 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Al Tompkins of Poynter

    **Moderated by Al Tompkins, Poynter

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Behind bulletproofing (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Nicole Vap of KUSA/9News Denver; Lynn Walsh of Trusting News project; Rick Yarborough of NBC4 Washington

    Making a story bulletproof is about more than fact-checking. It’s about building trust with your viewer. From how you handle confidential sources to silhouetted interviews, how are you explaining your process along the way? From on-air to online and all the social platforms in between, learn how you can build trust and keep it!

    Crystal C

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Career roundtable

    Speakers: Jack Gillum of ProPublica; Chandra Thomas Whitfield of Fund for Investigative Journalism; Noe Gonzalez of Telemundo Arizona; Terri Langford of independent journalist; Katie Wilcox of KPNX/NBC12 Phoenix

    Looking for advice on how to take the next step in your career? Get practical tips from panelists who will talk about their own experiences and discuss what employers are looking for.

    Oceans 4

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Election & Politics Track: What is that politician hiding? And other backgrounding tips

    Speakers: Steve Eder of The New York Times; James Grimaldi of The Wall Street Journal; Naomi Martin of The Dallas Morning News

    Election season is upon us. We’ll discuss the best tips, websites and tools for scrubbing candidates at all levels of government, from the Trump administration to City Hall to the courthouse. We’ll show you how to investigate through politicians' business ties, past work experience, public records and even family to find potential conflicts of interest while writing the investigative profile — plus other stories that help inform readers. You'll learn backgrounding techniques that can be used for stories about politicos in the never-ending election season or for profiles about everyday individuals in your community.

    Crystal AB

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    Finding the story: Murder, you wrote (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Thomas Hargrove of Murder Accountability Project

    Learn how to investigate FBI computer files to look for serial killers in your town. Determine what kinds of killings go unsolved. Get the same training that homicide detectives receive from Thomas Hargrove, founder of the Murder Accountability Project.

    Oceans 9-10

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Finding, nurturing and protecting sources

    Speakers: Olivia Carville of The New Zealand Herald; Mary Hargrove of independent journalist; Corey Johnson of Tampa Bay Times

    This panel will share techniques and strategies essential to landing and protecting the most sensitive and delicate sources around - sexual assault victims, government administrators, whistleblowers and insiders within criminal organizations.

    Oceans 6-8

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • IRE Commons - O’Brien Fellowships: $65,000 in support of nine-month investigative reporting projects (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speakers: Dave Umhoefer of Marquette University; Gary Harki of The Virginian-Pilot; Greg Borowski of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Maria Perez of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Reporters and editors affiliated with the O’Brien Fellowship in Public Service Journalism discuss the award-winning projects produced by journalists selected for the program at Marquette University. Projects have tackled issues around criminal justice, education, the environment, health, science, government secrecy and more. O’Brien selects 3-5 fellows annually. Find out how to apply.

    Veiltail

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    On the beat: How to ferret out government contracting abuse

    Speakers: Gregory Gordon of McClatchy; Carrie Jung of WBUR; Patrick Malone of The Center for Public Integrity

    Three veteran journalists share their experiences and secrets in how to unearth shady or improper government contracting arrangements at the federal, state and local levels. The panelists will provide details of how they uncovered shenanigans that cost taxpayers millions of dollars -- even billions of dollars -- in procurements for two-way radios, K-12 education and Pentagon work. They will school attendees about filing public records requests, contacting the competitors of suspect companies and tracking incestuous relationships involving contract officers.

    Oceans 3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Working with data in python for beginners *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Cody Winchester of IRE and NICAR; Matt Wynn of USA TODAY Network

    Skill level: Intermediate

    This three-hour crash course will introduce you to the Python programming language as it is used for data analysis in the newsroom. We'll cover basic syntax and programming concepts; newsroom use cases and examples; and analyze data using a library called pandas. We'll also talk about how to get up and running with Python on your own machine so you can take it all home.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    Workshop prerequisites: You should be comfortable working with data in spreadsheets or SQL. No programming experience required.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Coral A

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Reporting on the opioid epidemic

    Speakers: Julia Lurie of Mother Jones; Holly Baltz of The Palm Beach Post; James Pilcher of The Cincinnati Enquirer

    Overdoses are killing more Americans each year than U.S. military deaths during the Vietnam War, yet there are only a handful of reporters on the opioid beat. Hear from reporters who are dedicated to covering the epidemic from multiple angles as they share the stories behind articles they’ve written and tips on how to cover this national crisis. Learn how to use data to show the scope of the epidemic, how to investigate pharmaceutical companies making painkillers, how to create empathy for a disease that is incredibly stigmatized, and how to navigate source-reporter relationships with active drug users and dealers. 

    Crystal E

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Storytelling Track: How to turn your investigation into a narrative: Getting them to read to the very last word

    Speakers: James B. Steele of independent journalist; Bernice Yeung of ProPublica

    Deep reporting? Check. Killer interviews? Check. But how do you pull it all together? Learn from master storytellers on key approaches to organization, writing, revising and self-editing to produce compelling stories with high impact.

    Oceans 5-7

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Torturing Excel into doing statistics

    Speaker: Norm Lewis of University of Florida

    Want to know a bit more about statistics but aren't sure where to start? This session is a gentle introduction to stats you might want use in your journalism, working with a tool you already know.

    This session is good for: People who are familiar with functions in Excel.

    Coral B

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Friday #2 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Al Tompkins of Poynter

    **Moderated by Al Tompkins, Poynter

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

     

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: 10 of the most important lessons I've learned (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Nancy Amons of WSMV-Nashville; Matt Goldberg of NBCUniversal; Tisha Thompson of ESPN

    From diving deep on a long-term investigative project to building and running a team, hear from three TV news veterans about the most important lessons they’ve learned in their careers.

    Crystal C

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • IRE Commons - Diversity Track: Women in the newsroom (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speakers: Vicky Nguyen of NBC News; Amy Julia Harris of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Myriam Masihy of Telemundo 51; Christina Jewett of Kaiser Health News

    This session will be an off-the-record discussion about being a woman in the newsroom. Some topics we'll bring up will include: negotiating your pay and the pay gap, balancing family and work, challenges and advice on climbing the ladder, dealing with sexist accusations about your reporting and pushing back when you know you have a good story. 

    Veiltail

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Management Track: Vetting story ideas and knowing when to cut bait

    Speakers: Greg Borowski of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Dwayne Bray of ESPN; Audrey Cooper of San Francisco Chronicle

    It's easy to fall in love with a story idea and keep pursuing it far beyond its viability. Learn tricks of the trade from experienced editors who've discovered ways to vet story ideas effectively and efficiently. Discover how to know when to hold 'em or when to fold 'em and move on to a more promising idea or thread.

    Oceans 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Mapping in Excel with ArcGIS Maps for Office

    Speakers: Robby Deming of Esri; Chris Vaillancourt of Esri

    Charts and graphs are a great way to start to tell your story, but what happens when you want to go further? With ArcGIS Maps for Office, you can create maps, perform analysis and gain new understanding without ever leaving Excel. Come to this session to learn how you can visualize your data in new ways that will capture your audience’s attention. 
     
    With this session, you will get hands-on experience with ArcGIS Maps for Office and complimentary access to ArcGIS Pro, ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Maps for Office so you can continue your visualization journey long after you leave the conference.
     
    This session is good for: Anyone who works with data in Excel and wants to find new ways of easily telling visual stories with that data.

    Coral B

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    No surprises: Transparency and the art of the investigative interview

    Speakers: Karen de Sa of San Francisco Chronicle; T. Christian Miller of ProPublica

    Hear candid and unconventional advice from two reporters on how to interview sources who’ve suffered trauma and officials who fear exposure.

    Oceans 6-8

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Reporting on guns

    Speakers: Brian Freskos of The Trace; Kristin Hussey of independent journalist; Kathleen McGrory of Tampa Bay Times; Cheryl W. Thompson of NPR

    From mass shootings to police shootings, guns are penetrating all types of communities in record numbers. Learn how to report on gun theft and link stolen guns to crimes, and obtain and analyze data to examine trends in gun injuries and deaths. Our panelists will offer strategies to help you effectively cover issues involving guns.

    Oceans 5-7

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Rolling investigations

    Speakers: Ziva Branstetter of The Washington Post; Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times; Jeremy Rogalski of KHOU-Houston

    Six months to do a story? Hardly. Hear from editors and reporters whose stories unfold at the speed of spot news. Learn how to tackle investigations based on breaking news without sacrificing daily coverage. Discover the benefits of rolling out stories in an ongoing investigation rather than waiting weeks or months to publish or go on air with all of the findings.

    Crystal E

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Storytelling Track: Self-editing moves you can start today

    Speakers: Leslie Eaton of The Marshall Project; Amy Fiscus of The New York Times; Andy Hall of Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism

    Everyone needs an editor, to be sure. But you can become your first editor with these tangible tips and proven techniques for strengthening stories before you submit them. Learn from seasoned editors on how to make your stories sing. Editors, too, will pick up strategies for helping writers produce work that resonates with readers.

    Crystal AB

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Tapping your community to enhance your investigation

    Speakers: Adriana Gallardo of ProPublica; Jeanne Pinder of ClearHealthCosts; Jesse Hardman of Internews; Josh Hinkle of KXAN/NBC Austin

    Join this session to hear how you can generate interest to launch an investigation that leads to accountability and results for your community - plus how this method can help share, market and showcase the project for its biggest impact. The panelists will also talk about the drawbacks, challenges and warnings to look for before your story goes live.

    Oceans 4

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    Using drug databases: Tips for avoiding pitfalls (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Pat Beall of The Palm Beach Post

    The CDC’s WONDER database is the best national database of drug deaths, but it's outdated and flawed, leading to undercounted heroin deaths and overcounted deaths from prescription opioids. Yet this is the database that researchers primarily turn to time and time again to identify and prove drug trends, which then becomes the baseline for policy decisions about drugs. 

    Join this demo as veteran investigative reporter Pat Beall walks you through what’s available in data, shows how to use the CDC numbers (they are tricky), explains the pitfalls and possible workarounds and also identifies ways to localize reporting some of the data-based problems.

    Oceans 9-10

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Friday #3 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Al Tompkins of Poynter

    **Moderated by Al Tompkins, Poynter

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Art of accountability (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Joel Grover of NBC4 Los Angeles; Tony Kovaleski of KMGH-Denver; Vicky Nguyen of NBC News

    Experienced broadcast investigative reporters share techniques and tips for how they prepare for and conduct accountability interviews. They will cover their approaches to a scheduled interview versus an unscheduled interview, show examples, and discuss lessons learned. It will be a lively panel with plenty of news you can use for your own accountability interviews in markets big and small.

    Crystal C

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Diversity Track: Finding data and context in Native communities

    Speakers: Tristan Ahtone of High Country News; Jenni Monet of independent journalist; Pam Dempsey of The Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting

    Reporting on Native communities can present many challenges, not the least of which is finding and using reliable data on issues those communities face. In this panel you'll hear from two reporters working to close this information gap. You'll hear how High Country News is handling data leaks and confidential news tips from tribal government employees, as well as analyzing historical data for investigative reporting in Indian Country. You'll also learn about a project gathering information on missing and murdered Indigenous women.

    This panel was planned in collaboration with the Native American Journalists Association.

    Crystal AB

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: Sports business stories you should be covering

    Speakers: Steve Berkowitz of USA TODAY Network; Noah Pransky of independent journalist; Jodi Upton of Syracuse University

    Sports, from high schools to the pros, are rife with money – and that makes them rich sources of investigative storylines. From campus connections to Super Bowl stadiums, this panel will teach you how to find sports business stories in your community, how to follow the money to the next big scandal, and other hidden places you can find great sports investigations.  We’ll also talk about imminent disruptions in college athletics that could overhaul the business of amateur sports.

    Crystal E

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    Public Records Track: Free the docs: Organizing large-scale public records projects from start to finish (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Aron Pilhofer of Temple University; Michael Morisy of MuckRock

    Learn how to successfully manage a large-scale investigation that juggles dozens or hundreds of FOIA and public records requests as well as other open source information, with tips on everything from language to use to managing following up and finally cleaning and crowdsourcing data to presenting your findings. This session will explore how tools from MuckRock, FOIA Machine, and DocumentCloud can help, including a look at the new crowdsourcing tool Assignments, which was developed jointly by MuckRock and DocumentCloud.

    Oceans 9-10

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    SHOWCASE: Doubling down on investigative reporting

    Speakers: Dean Baquet of The New York Times; Martin Baron of The Washington Post; Cynthia McFadden of NBC News

    **Moderated by Cynthia McFadden

    In an epic newspaper competition, The New York Times and The Washington Post both have invested significant resources in watchdog journalism in recent years. Both have broken major stories on the Trump administration, sexual harassment and other issues on the national agenda. At the same time, both newspapers have reached record readership levels. Get an inside perspective from Dean Baquet, executive editor of the Times, and Marty Baron, executive editor of the Post. The lively, insightful conversation will be moderated by Cynthia McFadden, senior investigative and legal correspondent for NBC News.

    Oceans 6-8

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Stats in R

    Speaker: Steve Reilly of USA TODAY Network

    Learn how to use R to spot trends and identify relationships in data using social science theories and methods. In this session, we will use R for statistical significance tests, cross-tabulations and linear regression.

    This session is good for: Anyone who is comfortable working with spreadsheets and database managers and wants to learn how to do basic statistical analysis. Some experience with R will be helpful.

    Coral B

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Oceans 11-12

    12:45 pm - 2:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Media lawyers brown-bag (Sponsored by TEGNA Foundation)

    Speakers: Jeff Hermes of Media Law Resource Center; Jennifer Mansfield of Holland & Knight; Chris Moeser of TEGNA Inc.; Matt Topic of Loevy & Loevy; Katie Townsend of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press

    Does your investigation contain complex legal questions? Unsure of how to proceed? Bring your lunch and your questions for a discussion with some prominent media law experts who will be presenting throughout the 2018 IRE Conference. We'll provide drinks and dessert.

    Oceans 4

    12:45 pm - 2:00 pm

  • Workshop

    Master class: The advanced art of the TV interview (Broadcast focus) **pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Tisha Thompson of ESPN; Lea Thompson of independent journalist

    Handling deniers, liars, whistleblowers, blabbermouths, know-it-alls, media-trained automatons, murderers, celebrities, children, victims and those “taking the fifth.” Using real behind-the-scenes examples, we’ll share techniques on how to plan, prepare and execute the most difficult interviews in investigative reporting, including formats that are often overlooked but need real planning, like hidden camera, news conferences, sit-down confrontations and anonymous interviews.

    This class is good for: Those both on and off camera, as we’ll hit on what reporters, producers, MMJs and photographers all need to be thinking about during both one camera and two camera interviews.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Mako

    2:30 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced Excel tools

    Speaker: Kimbriell Kelly of Los Angeles Times

    You've imported complicated data and you've conquered pivot tables. You think you've done all you can do in Excel? Think again. In this one-hour class, learn how to go farther with advanced pivot table tricks and formulas that will take your data analysis in Excel to the next level.

    This class is good for: People who have taken the Excel 1,2 and 3 classes

    Coral B

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Deep dive 2 (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Jodie Fleischer of NBC4 Washington; Harry Hairston of NBC10 Philadelphia; Chris Vanderveen of KUSA/9News Denver

    A deep dive into how some of the biggest stories of the year came to fruition

    Crystal C

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Diversity Track: Finding stories in hidden communities

    Speakers: Anita Hassan of Las Vegas Review-Journal; Jaeah Lee of independent journalist; Jenni Monet of independent journalist; Andrea Castillo of Los Angeles Times

    Don’t settle for “it can’t be done.” This session will discuss how to cover and build relationships with overlooked communities such as Native Americans, immigrants, the homeless and people experiencing racism or hate. Panelists will give practical tips on how to connect with people in such communities, understanding the challenges marginalized groups face and how to tell their stories.

    Oceans 6-8

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Election & Politics Track: Finding the story: Campaign finance

    Speaker: Carrie Levine of The Center for Public Integrity

    A hands-on introduction to searching for, finding and using federal campaign finance data for beginners. This class will cover using the new Federal Election Commission website to find and download different types of campaign finance data. We’ll also review things to know about the data, including common pitfalls. 

    This session is good for: people who want an introduction to finding and working with federal campaign finance data. Knowing Excel will be helpful.

    Coral A

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Election & Politics Track: From fake fraud to lame laws: Investigating voting rights in America

    Speakers: Jessica Huseman of ProPublica; Sam Levine of Huffington Post; Pema Levy of Mother Jones

    Across the country, legislatures have passed or are considering laws that radically change the way we vote. To justify the changes, they cite anecdotal and often exaggerated cases of fraud or cherrypick academic work. A new study shows media coverage is the key indicator for whether voters believe voter fraud is a real problem, so it's imperative journalists get this coverage right. You'll walk away from this panel with actionable steps to cover election administration and changing voting laws in your home state and county. Learn to pick apart studies, ask activists tough questions, and use publicly available data to better understand local voting issues. 

    Crystal AB

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    How to report and produce break-out work: Exploring Livingston Award winning investigations with the Knight Foundation

    Speakers: Chris Davis of USA TODAY Network; Christina Goldbaum of independent journalist; Michael Schmidt of The New York Times

    **Moderated by Chris Davis, USA TODAY Network

    Meet the 2018 winners of The Livingston Awards for Young Journalists. From landing their first journalism jobs to breaking investigation award-winning pieces, they will examine ways to get noticed, dig deeper and tell powerful stories.

    Oceans 4

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • IRE Commons - Management Track: Do I want to be a boss? Making the transition from reporter to editor (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speaker: Tracy Weber of ProPublica

    Considering a move into management? Or are you already a fairly new manager? If so, this IRE Commons conversation can help you navigate the path from reporter to editor or producer. Explore key considerations including supervisory and leadership duties, work/life balance, and working relationships with colleagues who recently may have been your peers. 

    Veiltail

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: Harvesting stories from Big Ag

    Speakers: Pam Dempsey of The Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting; Sam Fromartz of The Food & Environment Reporting Network, Inc.; Brant Houston of University of Illinois; Peggy Lowe of Harvest Public Media

    Whether it's exploitation of migrant workers, foreign purchases of farmland and companies, deadly food recalls, pollution and pesticides, or wasteful government spending, there are many big agribusiness stories going unnoticed. This session will identify databases, expert sources and ideas and techniques for investigations into these fertile fields.

    Oceans 3

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Storytelling Track: How to outline for stories big and small

    Speakers: Pat Beall of The Palm Beach Post; Stephanie McCrummen of The Washington Post; James Neff of The Philadelphia Inquirer

    You've gathered all of the goods: dynamite interviews, juicy documents, key data and more. Now what? How best to organize and tell your story? A trio of successful writers and editors will share tips on how to corral all of that material and turn it into a story that's clear and compelling. Outlining can be a critical and often overlooked component of a successful story. Roman numerals optional.

    Crystal E

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Demo

    The wizarding world of investigative research (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Barbara Gray of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism; Margot Williams of The Intercept; Gary Price of INFOdocket

    Investigative reporters and researchers will dive into the latest tools and tricks for public records research and advanced search techniques, ride on to online privacy and alerting services and finish the run with personal web caching and archiving.

    Oceans 9-10

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    When the world comes to town: Managing large-scale breaking news stories

    Speakers: Rachel Crosby of Las Vegas Review-Journal; Silvia Foster-Frau of San Antonio Express-News; Naseem Miller of Orlando Sentinel; Nicole Vap of KUSA/9News Denver

    It's all hands on deck in your newsroom. Your community is still processing what has happened. You're competing with national and international media to tell a story about tragedy in your local community. How do you manage your emotions and your coverage?

    Oceans 5-7

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    A conversation with Seymour Hersh: Tips from a life in journalism

    Speakers: Matt Apuzzo of The New York Times; Seymour Hersh of independent journalist

    **Moderated by Matt Apuzzo

    Renowned investigative reporter Seymour Hersh offers practical lessons and advice from a nearly 50-year career unearthing some of the government’s biggest secrets. Learn practical tips from the master on developing sources, interviewing and dealing with government officials who are working to stop you.

    Oceans 5-7

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Beginner PDF: Unleash the data - tools and tricks for taming PDFs

    Speaker: Adelaide Chen of Orlando Sentinel

    In this class, we’ll take a one-page airport traffic report from Miami International Airport and demo three ways to get it into a spreadsheet so you can do more with the numbers. Using Tabula, CometDocs, or the Sublime Text editor. No coding experience needed. Then we’ll demo PDFtk, an easy command line tool that can merge a folder of PDFs or split a PDF into separate files by page. 

    This class is good for: People who don’t have Adobe Acrobat Pro/DC.

    Coral A

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Friday #4 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Scott Matthews of CNBC

    **Moderated by Scott Matthews, CNBC

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Anatomy of an investigation (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Cindy Galli of ABC News; A. J. Lagoe of KARE 11 Minneapolis/St. Paul; Bigad Shaban of NBC Bay Area

    Think investigative reporting follows a formula? Think again. This panel will reveal ways to turn an investigation on its ear, from pitch to roll out. See how veteran reporters have crafted some of the biggest stories of last year, sometimes using unconventional methods.

    Crystal C

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    CARwash: Data cleaning in Excel

    Speaker: Meredith Broussard of New York University

    Dirty data lurk everywhere: in text files, spreadsheets, databases and PDFs. We'll walk you through some examples of the most common types of dirty data, point out telltale signs of data illness and explain how you can whip data into shape using some simple tools and methods.

    This session is good for: People with some experience working with data in columns and rows, in spreadsheets or database managers.

    Coral B

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Diversity Track: Investigating bias: From courts to the classroom

    Speakers: Vanessa de la Torre of WNPR; Josh Salman of GateHouse Media; Topher Sanders of ProPublica; Lorie Fridell of University of Southern Florida

    Racial biases are pervasive in many of our public systems, from policing to courts to education and housing. Learn how you can pinpoint bias on your beat, and how to use social science methods to make sure you're right.

    Crystal AB

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • IRE Commons - Freelancers' roundtable (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speakers: Jaeah Lee of independent journalist; Laird Townsend of Freelance Investigative Reporters and Editors (FIRE); Lee van der Voo of independent journalist

    This brainstorm will identify burgeoning solutions to the most urgent problems in the field of freelance investigative reporting — from legal protection to monetization, especially compensation of a reporter's time. We'll also discuss some time, taxes and revenue management tips to help freelancers think like the sole proprietors of a small business. Facilitated by Freelance Investigative Reporters and Editors, via a new foundation grant to define and strengthen the freelance investigative reporting field.

    Veiltail

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Management Track: Partnerships: Pros/cons and how to dive in

    Speakers: Stephen Engelberg of ProPublica; Will Fitzgibbon of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Lorie Hearn of inewsource; Amy Pyle of USA TODAY Network; Matthew Sarnecki of Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project; Ellen Weiss of Scripps Washington Bureau; Brad Wolverton of NerdWallet

    Creative collaborations bring more firepower to news investigations. Learn about new approaches, tactics and models for successful partnerships in communities of all sizes. Hear about the downside of collaborations, too, and ways to learn from the mistakes of others. 

    Oceans 3

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Misinformation and strategies to combat deceit (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Dakota Flournoy of Storyful; Katie Sanders of PolitiFact; Craig Silverman of BuzzFeed News; Jennifer Preston of Knight Foundation; Cameron Hickey of PBS

    With bad actors orchestrating campaigns to deceive the public, how can journalists report on the trends and tactics used to spread misinformation online? Discover the latest tools and tactics for uncovering misinformation and deceit.

    Oceans 4

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Demo

    Technology and Tools Track: Digital security risks — and what you can do about them (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Mike Tigas of ProPublica

    The digital world presents journalists with unique problems while communicating with sources and colleagues. Come to this session for a primer on the risks inherent in digital communications, how to evaluate your own risks and ways to protect yourself with modern tools.

    Lots of security tools are unusable nightmares! This session will focus on pragmatic, realistic tools and ways of approaching digital risk, rather than paranoia (and tools you'll never get your friends or sources to use). Whether you're a reporter regularly dealing with sensitive sources, or if you're just curious to learn more about the tech we take for granted, this session is for you.

    Oceans 9-10

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Technology and Tools Track: Fast and furious fact-finding with Facebook

    Speaker: Henk van Ess of Bellingcat

    Dutch-born Henk van Ess (twitter.com/henkvaness) does some fast and furious fact-checking in Facebook, using examples inspired by recent news stories such as the Manchester bombing, Las Vegas shooting, Jihadi John, the Russian investigation and Cambridge Analytica. Among the tricks he will show: 

    * finding hidden friends on Facebook

    * finding the precise profile of an imprisoned person

    * what to do when a terrorist or suspect profile is deleted 

    * how to find people on Facebook with very common last names

    * investigating people on Facebook when you only have a first name and a city 

    * determining which U.S. senators are followed by which Russians

    * searching for certain keywords from certain persons

    * and the most important Facebook Formula you will ever see for your daily work. 

    Crystal E

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Work Better Track: The juggling act: Balancing beat reporting with investigative work

    Speakers: Sarah Karp of WBEZ Public Radio; Rob O'Dell of The Arizona Republic; Sean Sullivan of NJ Advance Media

    We’ll try to answer the age-old question beat reporters have been asking since the beginning of time: How do you balance doing daily work with pursuing investigative work? We’ll offer tips on how you can excel at both speeds. Topics include: using quick-turns and dailies to fuel your bigger projects, techniques for ensuring you won’t get beat on competitive stories, using the news cycle to propel your investigation, and managing your editors and (more importantly) yourself.

    Oceans 6-8

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Blue force tracker: Notes from the field for successful military reporting and investigations

    Speakers: Mike Hixenbaugh of NBC News; James LaPorta of Newsweek; Brandy Zadrozny of NBC News

    The military has its own unique culture, one that requires its own formal education. But despite its exclusivity, the Pentagon requires a consistent level of scrutiny from the working press on behalf of the American people as they too have problems we see in everyday society. 

    From war on foreign battlefields and secret classified missions to sexual assault and post-traumatic stress, service members are voiceless as they are often discouraged from speaking candidly to the media. For the new or even seasoned reporter, the task of covering the largest U.S. government agency can be daunting. 

    This session will be current " notes from the field" from experienced journalists on how to navigate these closed-off waters in order to effectively report on the U.S. military.

    Crystal E

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Friday #5 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Kevin Keeshan of NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations

    **Moderated by Kevin, Keeshan, NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Visual storytelling: A new perspective (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Brendan Keefe of WXIA-Atlanta; Anna Hewson of KUSA/9News Denver; Andy Miller of Gray Television

    Every great investigation deserves stunning visualization. Don’t let your visuals be an afterthought. Join our skilled panelists as they provide inspiration, tips, and discussion on how to create investigations so eye-catching, you can’t help but get noticed. From the fundamentals of visual storytelling to creating impactful images that stimulate action – “A new perspective” will send you home with ways to improve the look of your next investigation.

    Crystal C

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Excel 1: Getting started (repeat)

    Speaker: Kate Howard of Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting

    In this introduction to spreadsheets, you'll begin analyzing data with Excel, a simple but powerful tool. You'll learn how to enter data, sort it, filter it and conduct simple calculations like sum, average and median.

    This session is good for: Data beginners.

    Coral B

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intermediate PDF: Using OCR to extract data from PDFs

    Speaker: Miguel Barbosa of CitizenAudit

    This class will cover basic approaches for getting text out of PDF documents using powerful and freely available tools. Participants will be introduced to basic concepts and walked-through tackling common challenges encountered with tricky PDF documents.

    This session is good for: People who are familiar with PDF to text tools and would like to learn how optical character recognition (OCR) tools can be used for extracting difficult text from images embedded in PDF document.

    Coral A

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating climate change

    Speakers: Amy Green of 90.7 WMFE; Zahra Hirji of BuzzFeed News; Ingrid Lobet of Johns Hopkins University; Neena Satija of The Texas Tribune

    People flooded out of homes that were built, fully permitted, in an actual spillway. Small towns left alone to plan for rising sea level. The latest on who’s funding climate doubt. And how "clean natural gas" isn't so clean. Come for story ideas, advice on key sources and data, and pointers on telling the story of climatic change.

    Crystal AB

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Panel

    SHOWCASE: Investigating sexual misconduct and #MeToo

    Speakers: Brett Anderson of The Times-Picayune; Amy Brittain of The Washington Post; Rebecca Corbett of The New York Times; Marisa Kwiatkowski of USA TODAY Network; Beth Reinhard of The Washington Post; Bernice Yeung of ProPublica

    **Moderated by Bernice Yeung, Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

    It was a year of reckoning for prominent men accused of sexual harassment, abuse and assault. Go behind the scenes of #MeToo coverage with key journalists who reported and edited major stories involving President Trump, movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, CBS news host Charlie Rose, U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore of Alabama, USA Gymnastics physician Larry Nassar and New Orleans chef John Besh. Panelists will share lessons learned from the investigations that can guide coverage of sexual misconduct in any community.

    Oceans 5-8

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Demo

    Tools for mining federal court documents (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Brad Heath of Reuters; Mike Lissner of Free Law Project

    Federal court records are a treasure trove, and not just for the reasons you think. Sure court filings can tell you what’s up with the president’s lawyer, or his ex-campaign chairman – and we’ll tell you how to stay up to speed. But federal courts can generate 150,000 documents a day, and there’s treasure buried in there. We’ll show you the data and tools that will help you find it, and try to help with any obstacles you’ve hit.

    Oceans 9-10

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Board candidate speeches

    Meet the candidates for the IRE Board of Directors at 6:15 p.m. in Oceans 5-8, located on the 1st floor of the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld following the afternoon Showcase Panel. 

    Oceans 5-8

    6:15 pm - 6:30 pm

  • Panel

    The IRE services you don't know about

    Speakers: Charles Minshew of IRE and NICAR; Lauren Grandestaff of IRE and NICAR

    You've entered IRE contests, you've attended trainings, you're at this conference. But, did you know that you can hire IRE to do research for your stories? Did you know that the NICAR Data Library staff can help you clean data and analyze it for you? Learn more about everything IRE can do for you.

    Oceans 3

    8:30 am - 8:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Getting started in R *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Charles Minshew of IRE and NICAR; Hannah Fresques of ProPublica; Olga Pierce of University of Nebraska - Lincoln

    Skill level: Intermediate

    We will introduce you to R, a free, powerful open-source programming language, that will add statistical heft to your reporting. By the end of this three-hour session, you will be able to take raw data, import it into R, and start your analysis. Topics will include basic data importing, working with directories, reading in data, installing packages, creating simple visualizations, and how to clean, explore and sort your data. We'll also talk about how to find help when you're stuck.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    Workshop prerequisites: This session will be most helpful if you’re comfortable working with data and you’re ready to take your skills to the next level.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Coral B

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Workshop

    Master class: Writing the investigative narrative **pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Maria Carrillo of Tampa Bay Times

    You’ve gathered data, docs and human sources. Now it’s time to turn your reporting into a story -- or a series -- that packs a punch. If you’re new to investigative storytelling or want to up your writing game, this workshop is for you.

    Veteran editor Maria Carrillo has led some of the best narrative teams in the country. In this half-day workshop, she’ll cover the entire story lifecycle, from reporting to writing to planning for publication. Topics include:

    * Understanding narrative

    * Reporting for story -- How to gather the details and scenes that will give your piece emotional power

    * Focus and framing – Finding your way through all that material

    * Self-editing tips and techniques

    * Developing a story team -- How to get photographers, artists, designers, digital producers and editors unified behind a common vision

    We’ll look at examples of successful stories, pulling back the curtain to see how they came together.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Mako

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Saturday - #1 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Lea Thompson of independent journalist

    **Moderated by Lea Thompson, independent journalist

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Digital for dummies (and smarties) (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Mark Greenblatt of Scripps Washington Bureau; Noah Pransky of independent journalist; Joce Sterman of Sinclair Broadcast Group

    Veteran reporters with deep experience in video investigations unpack how to reach entirely new audiences through digital platforms. Learn how you can make your stories go viral without a large team by creating shareable videos that thrive on social platforms;  keeping audiences engaged online while driving your “time on site” numbers through the roof, and adopting multi-platform strategies ranging from digital-first investigations to using SoundCloud to deploy your own podcasts online.

    Crystal C

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Decoding business & financial documents (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Kelly Carr of Quinlan; Jo Craven McGinty of The Wall Street Journal; Aaron Kessler of CNN; David Milstead of The Globe and Mail

    Join this panel to learn how to use SEC records, track opaque companies and dig into state and local business records. We'll show examples of stories that use business documents and send you home with lots of great story ideas.

    Oceans 1

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Diversity Track: Covering immigrant communities

    Speakers: Howard Berkes of NPR; Brittny Mejia of Los Angeles Times; Maria Perez of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Perla Trevizo of Houston Chronicle

    As immigration protests, crackdowns and policy fights become more common, it can be easy to lose sight of many other issues that impact immigrant communities. This session will cover strategies to spot and report stories beyond immigration enforcement — although we will touch on how to deal with government agencies too. We will talk about building sources who can be reluctant to talk, broadening stories beyond the anecdote, covering immigration issues even if it's not your regular beat or jumping into your first project and reporting enterprise stories if you are a beat immigration reporter.

     

    Crystal AB

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • IRE Commons - Work Better Track: Family life and investigative journalism: It's not a balance, it's a see-saw (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speaker: Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    Let’s swap ideas and strategies on how to not suck at parenting while investigating. Topics might include parental leave, negotiations, present parenting, business travel and stamina for those long-term investigations.

    Veiltail

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Let's make some internet: Web development for beginners

    Speaker: Neil Bedi of Tampa Bay Times

    If you've been trying to figure out what all the fuss is about HTML, CSS and JavaScript, this session is for you. This session will introduce you to the basics of web development, help you make sense of the jargon and answer your questions. At the end of the session, you will have built a simple web page using HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

    This session is good for: Beginners in web development. No coding experience required.

    Coral A

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Localizing the investigation: Sexual misconduct

    Speakers: Bente Birkeland of KUNC Radio; Jim Brunner of The Seattle Times; Joel Ebert of The Tennessean

    From city halls to statehouses across the country, politicians are facing scrutiny like never before. Secrets about sexual impropriety and misdeeds once brushed aside as mere rumor have gained traction, in part to because of the #MeToo movement. Learn from state government and political reporters who have uncovered sexual misconduct allegations against elected officials. They will give tips on how to access investigation reports that are difficult to find or not considered open records, build and maintain relationships with reluctant sources who are afraid to speak out, vet information, and manage the fallout.

    Crystal E

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Management Track: Why don’t you just do what I want? Improving the editor/reporter relationship

    Speakers: Rob Barry of The Wall Street Journal; Jennifer Forsyth of The Wall Street Journal; Laura Frank of Rocky Mountain PBS; Mark Rochester of Detroit Free Press; Alison Young of Missouri School of Journalism

    So, you think your editor is unreasonable and just doesn't get it. Your editor thinks you need regular nudging to stay on track and meet deadlines. Relax. Our panel of veterans from both sides of the newsroom will help you with tips, suggestions and strategies to manage up, manage down, manage across and generally make the whole process work. (At least, most of the time).

    Oceans 2

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    SQL boot camp *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    Skill level: intermediate

    If you flip over pivot tables, but wish you had more data tools, this session is for you. Structured Query Language, or SQL, can help you find patterns in millions of records, help you join databases and make you sound extra cool when you talk with your news nerd friends. In addition to learning these skills, you’ll learn the song that will help you remember these skills.

    This class will be taught by two experienced data reporters and former IRE training directors, and materials will include the IRE Computer Assisted Reporting boot camp binder, full of exercises, cheat sheets and tips to help you boost your data analysis and storytelling skills. We will use a free database manager that can be easily installed and used on any computer.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    Workshop prerequisites: The only prerequisites are a reasonable comfort level with using a spreadsheet and the love of music. No previous SQL skills necessary.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Coral C

    9:00 am - 5:15 pm

  • Demo

    Technology and Tools Track: Amazing online investigative tools (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Paul Myers of BBC News

    Paul Myers, the BBC's acclaimed internet research sleuth, will walk the group through his favorite tools for digging up info online. This demo will help you find information online quickly, often without paying hefty fees to proprietary database companies. These include tools that squeeze more information from Facebook, incredible people-research tools and sites that let you use telecommunications to trace people.

    Palani

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Thinking big: Building a network of students and professionals to tackle national projects

    Speakers: Christopher Drew of Louisiana State University; Lindsay Huth of University of Maryland College Park; Rick Tulsky of Injustice Watch; Deborah Nelson of University of Maryland

    A group of universities and nonprofit news organizations have banded together to collectively undertake an ambitious national project on limited funds. They will discuss the model they are developing, solicit suggestions from the crowd and connect with potential partners.

    Oceans 4

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    When the system is the abuser: Investigating injustice in child welfare

    Speakers: Karen de Sa of San Francisco Chronicle; David Jackson of Chicago Tribune; Carol Marbin Miller of Miami Herald

    Three veteran investigative reporters who’ve worked the child welfare beat will share with you the methods they’ve developed to explore systemic problems in the agencies running the foster care system. Carol Marbin Miller will discuss how to investigate the most grievous cases, child deaths. David Jackson will offer guidance on how to get confidential records from professionals whose careers may be at stake. And Karen de Sá will discuss other metrics reporters can use to evaluate child well-being, including mental health treatment and law enforcement intervention for behavior management.

    Oceans 3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    #MeToo U: Sexual assault on campus

    Speakers: Alex Stuckey of Houston Chronicle; Kenny Jacoby of Scripps Washington Bureau; Paula Lavigne of ESPN

    Covering rape and sexual violence at universities comes with a whole range of obstacles, not the least of which is gaining trust of victims. Find out how to get – and vet – reports of sexual assault on college campuses through police reports, data, court cases, school files and other public records at public and private institutions. Get some advice on finding and building trust with sources, especially students, in the uniquely insular campus climate.  

    Oceans 4

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Saturday #2 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Kevin Keeshan of NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations

    **Moderated by Kevin Keeshan, NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: 50 Years of 60 Minutes (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Phil Williams of WTVF-Nashville; Sam Hornblower of 60 Minutes; Tanya Simon of CBS News 60 Minutes; Bill Whitaker of CBS News 60 Minutes; Oriana Zill de Granados of CBS News 60 Minutes

    Members of the 60 Minutes team reflect on the legacy of the iconic newsmagazine and its future during a time of upheaval in the media landscape.

    Crystal C

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Election & Politics Track: The documents you’re not using to investigate your capitol

    Speakers: Jeremy Finley of WSMV-Nashville; Rui Kaneya of The Center for Public Integrity; Barbara Rodriguez of The Des Moines Register

    This session will focus on how to find and scrutinize documents that result in great watchdog stories. From the governor’s office to state agencies, you’ll learn where to look and what to uncover.

    Oceans 2

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Immigration

    Speaker: Angilee Shah of Public Radio International

    There are some 320 million people in the U.S., and 43 million of them were born abroad. About 11 million people are undocumented and over 5.1 million children have at least one undocumented parent. 860,000 people have applied for temporary legal status because they were brought to the U.S. without proper documentation as children. Over 500,000 people are waiting for their cases to be heard in immigration courts. Some 270,000 people in the U.S. came as refugees. On any given day, about 40,000 people are in immigration detention.

    The numbers surrounding immigration can be daunting and hard to track down. At this popular session from IRE and CAR, participants walk away with a new data set and ideas for stories to dig into locally. And we'll work together to question numbers about immigration — and talk about what to do when the government is not providing data about its immigration actions.

    This session is good for: Anyone. No technical skills are needed for this workshop, though a little bit of comfort with math and some perseverance will help.

    Coral A

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    How to use data about U.S. terrorism cases (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Trevor Aaronson of The Intercept; Margot Williams of The Intercept

    As part of its award-winning series Trial and Terror, The Intercept tracks all international terrorism prosecutions in the United States since 9/11. We'll show you how you can use this data, which is updated regularly and available online in multiple forms, to take your reporting deeper on local or national terrorism and criminal justice. We'll discuss our methodologies and how to access and work with our interactive tool as well as the raw data we release under Creative Commons licensing. 

    Palani

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • IRE Commons - Diversity Track: Journalists of color in the newsroom (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speakers: Erica Byfield of WNBC New York City; Francisco Vara-Orta of IRE and NICAR

    Join an honest, off-the-record discussion on the challenges of being a journalist of color in newsrooms, which are mostly dominated by white people. And how can we, as JOCs, impact what inclusion looks like from the inside?

    Veiltail

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    On the beat: Police who cross the line

    Speakers: Maya Lau of Los Angeles Times; Topher Sanders of ProPublica; Lee Zurik of WVUE-New Orleans; Ben Conarck of The Florida Times-Union

    Want to investigate the investigators? We’ll talk candidly about how we dug up information that police officers would rather you not know. We’ll discuss the origins of our projects (one started from a tip four years ago!), the tough conversations we had with editors, the twists our stories took as we reported them, and how we were able to corroborate hard-to-confirm facts. Some of us also surveilled police officers as part of our reporting – we’ll talk about why that was necessary and how we navigated safety concerns. There will NOT be any PowerPoints during this session! Only lively conversation and plenty of time for questions from the audience.

    This session is good for: Anyone who wants to beef up their reporting about law enforcement (best beat ever).

    Crystal AB

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Public Records Track: Mastering the law to overcome roadblocks to access (Sponsored by TEGNA Foundation)

    Speakers: Frank LoMonte of Brechner Center for Freedom of Information; Carol Marbin Miller of Miami Herald; Miranda Spivack of independent journalist

    Journalists persistently report certain recurring access barriers (secretive police withholding documents, quasi-public nonprofits claiming to be "private" for FOI purposes, government employees gagged from giving interviews, databases hidden behind proprietary trade-secret software or made prohibitively expensive to duplicate, "student privacy" as a blanket excuse for campus opacity), and there are legal responses and strategies to overcome each of these. Mastering the law of access will help journalists tell their best stories and minimize delay and expense in getting the data and documents that make investigations come alive.

    Crystal E

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Storytelling Track: Immersion: Making the most of a long deadline

    Speakers: Ted Conover of New York University; Leon Dash of University of Illinois; Maya Rao of Author

    When does it make sense to "immerse" (and what does that even mean)? What does this approach demand in terms of reporting and of writing? What questions arise in an extended relationship with a source? We'll try to offer some tips on the blessing (and the curse) of a long lead time.

    Oceans 1

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Technology and Tools Track: Who’s your audience? Building investigative stories with impact.

    Speakers: Julia B. Chan of Mother Jones; Rick Hirsch of Miami Herald

    Investigative reporters can invest months, even years, on a project. But if they don't invest the time to create a strategy early on, during the reporting process, it may not reach the audience it needs to have the impact it deserves. This session will highlight successful and practical engagement strategies for investigative storytelling.

    Oceans 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Aiming for impact and dealing with the fallout

    Speakers: R.G. Dunlop of Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting; Katrice Hardy of The Greenville News; Phil Williams of WTVF-Nashville

    Months of watchdog work ends with compelling journalism, and sometimes also fallout from the subjects the stories are written about or others in your community. In some cases, the reaction means sources you once freely spoke to will no longer talk, or your FOIA requests become waiting games or go unanswered. It can be even more extreme: The subjects of the stories harm themselves or others. How do reporters and editors handle the fallout when the big projects are over? We will discuss tips for both reporters and editors who find themselves in similar situations.

    Crystal E

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    Backgrounding like a boss: Perfecting your 15-minute background check and why you should do it every time (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Kate Howard of Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting

    How are you sure that great source with the perfect quote isn't too good to be true? Even great reporters can get tricked by fake names or sketchy backgrounds. We'll walk through some websites and strategies you can use to create a routine and spot potential red flags before you get burned. This session is great for new reporters or anyone who wants to background people more thoroughly.

     

    Palani

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Beyond numbers: Finding characters and stories in data

    Speakers: Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV; Shawn McIntosh of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University

    Most reporters think that data is most useful to spot trends or count events. But each of those data points could be a story, and finding the anecdotes, characters and stories in data is just as important as finding evidence. We will help you find your story in data and share tips on how to focus on the best characters.

    Oceans 4

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Saturday #3 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Mikel Schaefer of WVUE-New Orleans

    **Moderated by Mike Schaefer, WVUE-New Orleans

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Investigating breaking news (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Tina Macias of KHOU-Houston; Tony Pipitone of NBC6 Miami; Anzio Williams of NBC10 Philadelphia; Tom Winter of NBC News

    Mass shooting, natural disaster, plane or train crash -- learn how urgent investigations can differentiate your reporting and your station’s coverage. Hear from a news director and investigative reporters and producers with experience uncovering exclusive content for day-of and after the big breaker.

    Crystal C

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Command line tools for reporters

    Speaker: AJ Vicens of Mother Jones

    Too often in data journalism, we forget about the basics. And it doesn't get any more basic than the command line. Even knowing a little will make your job easier. Mother Jones reporter AJ Vicens will run through some simple commands, dive into working with spreadsheets and show you some handy tools he frequently uses at work.

    This session is good for: People who feel intimidated by the command line on their computer, but want to explore the power of command line tools.

     

    Coral A

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Diversity Track: Uncovering the untold stories of Muslim Americans

    Speakers: Rawan Aldamen of Stream Media Consultancy; Waliya Lari of independent journalist; Imam Muhammad Musri of American Islam

    Did you know that Muslims are America's youngest and most diverse faith community? That 60 percent of Muslim-Americans are born in the US and 86 percent are citizens? That frequent mosque attendance is linked to less radicalization? That Muslim-American women are far more educated than Muslim-American men?  

    Journalists are missing these and other important stories about Muslim communities in the U.S. — which are comprised of 3.3 million people. Hear from a Muslim leader and a co-director of the AAJA Muslim America Task Force who explains why this is happening, how to find these missing stories and tell them in meaningful and impactful ways. These tools will take your newsroom's enterprise reporting to another level and the lessons apply to covering any marginalized community.

    This panel was planned in collaboration with the Asian American Journalists Association.

    Oceans 3

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Election & Politics Track: Getting the goods on members of Congress without a D.C. bureau

    Speakers: Lateshia Beachum of The Center for Public Integrity; Tom Brune of Newsday; Jonathan Salant of NJ Advance Media

    Learn tricks of the trade from veteran D.C. reporters on the documents, data and other essential information to track your local U.S. representatives and senators -- even if you're not in Washington.

    Oceans 2

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • IRE Commons - How to have "the talk" with your editor (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speaker: Steven Rich of The Washington Post

    Great news: there's data out there on nearly every possible subject! Bad news: a lot of it is basically unusable for any number of reasons. It can be difficult to tell your editor that the data doesn't exist or is too poor to use. Let's talk about strategies to help have this conversation in both our newsrooms and in the data journalism community.

    Veiltail

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Lock it down: Protecting yourself, your data and your sources

    Speakers: Marcus Baram of Fast Company; Alex Harris of Miami Herald; Adam Marshall of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press; Paul Myers of BBC News

    This panel will cover tips and tech to keep your data, your sources and your personal information safe in an increasingly digital world. We'll hear from journalists who have dealt with online impersonation and trolling, and cover tips for dealing with these attacks when they occur. We'll also discuss basic threat modeling and how you can use technology like Signal and email encryption to secure your information.

    Oceans 1

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: Charter schools and vouchers

    Speakers: Shaina Cavazos of Chalkbeat; Rose Ciotta of EdSource; Arianna Prothero of Education Week

    As charter schools and private schools accepting vouchers become more prevalent around the country, journalists have exposed issues such as fraud, mismanagement, poor accountability, political lobbying connections and discriminatory admissions practices. This panel will give you the tools you need to investigate charter schools and other school choice options in your city or state.

    Crystal AB

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Awards Luncheon

    IRE Awards Luncheon

    A highlight of the IRE conference, the IRE Awards Luncheon begins at 12:30 p.m. in Oceans Ballroom located on the 1st floor of the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld. We will present the 2017 IRE Awards and salute some of the best investigative work of the past year, and will hear from keynote speaker Bill Whitaker of CBS News 60 Minutes.

    Admission to the luncheon is included with your conference registration. Guest tickets can be purchased here for $60. Guest tickets will be available for pick-up at the IRE sales table at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld beginning Thursday, June 14 at 7:30 a.m.

    Oceans Ballroom

    12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Digging into data for stories (Saturday & Sunday) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Mark Walker of The New York Times; Denise Malan of IRE and NICAR; Cody Winchester of IRE and NICAR

    Skill level: Beginner

    Kickstart your data skills with IRE's original mini-boot camp. This series of hands-on classes will introduce you to spreadsheets with IRE's proven techniques. IRE's experienced trainers will start with the fundamentals of navigating spreadsheets and walk you through sorting, calculating and interviewing data in Microsoft Excel. You'll come away with a solid base for using data analysis in your own newsroom. In addition, we'll provide you with our boot camp materials to help keep you on track long after you leave the conference. Please note attendees are expected to attend both Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning sessions.

    Saturday's session will run from 3-5:15 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.


    Workshop prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this workshop and beginners are welcome. This workshop is good for those wanting to get started analyzing data for stories.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Coral B

    3:00 pm - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast Track: Deep dive 3 (Sponsored by National Association of Broadcasters)

    Speakers: Kiran Chawla of WAFB-Baton Rouge; Sarah Fitzpatrick of NBC News; Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area

    A deep dive into how some of the biggest stories of the year came to fruition

    Crystal C

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Covering the protest line

    Speakers: Kelly Hinchcliffe of WRAL-Raleigh; Matt Pearce of Los Angeles Times; Katie Townsend of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press

    This panel will address the ethical, legal and logistical issues of covering protests movements. Journalists who have reported on Ferguson, Black Lives Matter, antifa and white supremacist rallies will share tips for juggling on-the-ground reporting with watchdog coverage. A media lawyer will discuss the current legal climate, safety issues and what to do if you get arrested. You’ll leave with a better understanding of how to cover these important issues and story ideas for digging deeper.

    Oceans 2

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Demo

    Election & Politics Track: Tracking outside spending in elections (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Robert Maguire of Center for Responsive Politics

    Attend this demo to get tips and tricks for learning the source of anonymous political spending ahead of the 2018 midterm elections.

    Palani

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Python 1

    Speaker: Sandra Fish of independent journalist

    Python is a great language for journalists who want to analyze data, scrape websites and create web apps. It’s great for documenting and easily replicating your analyses. Get your toes wet in this class as we explore some Python basics.

    This session is good for: Anyone with a willingness to learn despite the inevitable errors you’ll make!

    Coral A

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • IRE Commons - Educators' roundtable (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speakers: Aimee Edmondson of Ohio University; David Armstrong of Georgia News Lab; Cheryl W. Thompson of NPR

    This is a discussion about the best practices and tips for turning the classroom into an investigative newsroom. Some of the topics discussed during the roundtable include: how to successfully teach investigative reporting at universities, teaching students about data and documents, and the challenges of running a student newsroom. Bring examples of what you've tried that's really worked or what you're planning to implement that you're excited about.

    Veiltail

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Management Track: Keeping it all together: Leading an investigation that crosses newsroom aisles

    Speakers: Lawan Hamilton of Scripps Washington Bureau; Matthew Purdy of The New York Times; Shawn McIntosh of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Herding cats might be easier some days than keeping a news investigation on track. Learn best practices for putting together the best team, keeping everyone focused and moving efficiently across the finish line. Special challenges include secure communication and file sharing, remote workers, newsroom politics and personalities, and interactive multimedia components for the investigation.

    Oceans 4

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Meet the authors - #1

    Speakers: David Cay Johnston of DCReport; Paula Lavigne of ESPN; Mark Schlabach of ESPN; Maya Rao of Author

    Join David Cay Johnston, Paula Lavigne, Mark Schlabach and Maya Rao for an informal author meet and greet.
     
    Bring your books to sign or purchase copies at the door. 
     

    Mako

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: Stories hidden in the courts

    Speakers: Reade Levinson of Reuters; Jenifer McKim of New England Center for Investigative Reporting; Charles Maldonado of The Lens

    From immigration issues to sex trafficking to wrongful convictions, investigative reporters use court records to bolster and build stories that are documented, data-driven and rich with detail. Three reporters with experience wading through court files discuss tips to find hidden stories and provide guidance even when records are hard to find.

    Oceans 1

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Technology and Tools Track: Bring your investigative reporting to life using animation

    Speakers: Hilke Schellmann of The Wall Street Journal; Ryan Gabrielson of ProPublica; Sam Ellis of Vox Media

    Got court transcripts of a particular riveting moment during a trial or first-hand accounts of abuse in a nursing home? This panel will show you new ways animation can bring documents and important moments of your investigation that happened behind closed doors to life. Animation can also help newsrooms attract a younger audience, who are naturally drawn to visual journalism and love to share exceptional work on social media. We will show how illustrations and motion graphics work and what best practices visual journalists have developed in their newsrooms. We will also tackle ethical pitfalls. And you will learn what you need to do to produce your own illustrations and explainer videos. This session requires no prior knowledge. 

    Oceans 3

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Technology and Tools Track: Fast and furious fact finding with Google, Wayback Machine, Skype and YouTube

    Speaker: Henk van Ess of Bellingcat

    Dutch-born Henk van Ess (twitter.com/henkvaness) is fact-checking once more (see also Fast and Furious Fact-Finding with Facebook) but is now focusing on fact-checking with Google, Wayback Machine, Skype and YouTube, inspired by recent stories written on tight deadlines. In this session, he will show:

    * how to find the secret address of a CEO by typing in a very strange looking formula into Google 

    * why every reporter should know about Google Triple Search

    * the clever Google trick that allows you to find out when something went viral, who is behind a nickname and even helps you to find deleted Instagram accounts

    * what to do when you have to view five hours of YouTube videos, but you only have 15 minutes

    * how to find the exact time that something was uploaded to YouTube

    * and why a backdoor in Skype is one of the best people finders.

    Crystal E

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Under pressure: Coping with stress, and knowing you’re not alone

    Speakers: Ken Armstrong of ProPublica; Mike Hixenbaugh; Lulu Ramadan of Palm Beach Post

    A young reporter who has covered three mass shootings in two years; a reporter with three young kids juggling investigative projects (and a hurricane); a veteran reporter dealing with the usual angst (the threat of being sued, subpoenaed, set up). At any stage of a reporter’s career, the pressures of the job can be daunting. A good start is talking about it. In this session, we’ll share experiences and ideas — ours and others' — for managing stress. 

    Crystal AB

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast Show & Tell - Saturday #4 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Greg Phillips of WMC-Memphis

    **Moderated by Greg Phillips, WMC-Memphis

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 15 minutes.

    Sign-ups open June 4, and additional slots will become available the afternoon of June 13. 

    Crystal D

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Criminal justice and mental health issues

    Speakers: Meg Kissinger of Columbia University; Jessica Priest of GateHouse Media; Gary Harki of The Virginian-Pilot

    There are thousands of jails across the country, and all of them are dealing with a mental health crisis. The National Alliance on Mental Illness estimates about 2 million mentally ill people are booked into jails every year. Sheriffs from Florida to Oregon will tell you that they've got people locked up for low-level offenses because there's nowhere else to put them. It's straining local budgets and leading to deaths. But how to report on it? Jails are some of the most opaque institutions in the country, and even when sheriffs and superintendents will talk, the story they have to tell is complex and weaves together criminal justice, social services, politics and science. Reporters who have investigated abuses and deaths of the mentally ill in jails will discuss how to report on and explain this complex problem to readers.

    Oceans 3

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Diversity & Management Tracks: Diversity that makes a difference

    Speakers: Manny Garcia of USA TODAY Network; Mira Lowe of University of Florida; Martin G. Reynolds of The Maynard Institute for Journalism Education; Ramon Escobar of CNN Worldwide

    Hiring and retaining diverse talent in the newsroom isn't just for show. It engenders trust from your community and helps you uncover stories that you might not find otherwise. This panel will go beyond talking points to show the real results that happen in newsrooms with diverse voices reporting in the field and making decisions back in the newsroom. 

    This panel was planned in collaboration with the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education.

    Crystal AB

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Diversity Track: Lost in translation: Trump, rhetoric and policies shaping communities of color

    Speakers: Talia Buford of ProPublica; Fernanda Echavarri of Mother Jones; Kimbriell Kelly of Los Angeles Times

    Learn the latest changes in immigration and environmental policy, the major drivers of deportation and degradation of environmental protections, how to reach people in detention centers and approach environmental justice communities with sensitivity. We’ll also show you how to find federal data and flag other major policy stories that should be on your radar for the rest of Trump’s Administration.

    This panel was planned in collaboration with the National Association of Black Journalists Region III.

    Oceans 2

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Finding fraud on your beat (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Roddy Boyd of Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation; David Cay Johnston of DCReport; Angie Moreschi of James Hoyer Law Firm

    Learn how to think like a corporate fraud investigator. What documents do you need to find? What are some red flags in them? And what might just be a red herring? This panel will walk you through the process to find fraud in the public or private sectors.

    Oceans 4

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Demo

    How to find secrets and story ideas in bankruptcy court records (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Katy Stech Ferek of The Wall Street Journal

    Expand your reporting into bankruptcy court filings, where journalists can uncover how businesses and people ended up in financial trouble, key details like a bankrupt person’s salary or monthly mortgage payment amount and sources who can help round out a story’s truths. Learn which PACER imitator websites work best for following unfolding cases, finding story ideas or digging up otherwise secret information, such as legal settlements or vendor contracts.

    Palani

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Python 2

    Speaker: Alex Richards of NerdWallet

    This session will cover some of the ways basic programming in Python can collect data for stories from the web and generally speed up your reporting. We will cover fundamental concepts you need to know and tackle a small, practical project.

    This session is good for: People who understand some Python basics and want to take that knowledge a little further.

    Coral A

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • IRE Commons - How pros can help reinvent college media (IRE Commons sponsored by Facebook)

    Speakers: Jessica Huseman of ProPublica; Frank LoMonte of Brechner Center for Freedom of Information; Melissa Gomez of Los Angeles Times; Jimena Tavel of Tampa Bay Times; Caitlin Ostroff of McClatchy

    The campus newsrooms that birthed so many of today's top investigative journalists are imperiled by economic, readership and governance troubles. Alumni can help embattled student editors build stronger, more sustainable publications and grow their audience. Let's brainstorm about solutions. 

    Veiltail

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Make your move: Career advice for climbing the investigative ladder

    Speakers: Madi Alexander of The Dallas Morning News; Cary Aspinwall of The Marshall Project; Brittney Johnson of WSOC-Charlotte; Molly Solomon of Oregon Public Broadcasting

    Looking to take the next step in your career? Want to move from crime briefs to hard-hitting investigative stories? Get honest advice and input from journalists who once had the same questions you have now. This session is geared toward folks who are early in their careers, though anyone is welcome.

    Oceans 1

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Meet the authors - #2

    Speakers: Meredith Broussard of New York University; Mary Shanklin of Fifth Estate Media; Blake Ellis of CNN; Melanie Hicken of CNN; T. Christian Miller of ProPublica

    Join Meredith Broussard, Blake Ellis, Melanie Hicken, T. Christian Miller and Mary Shanklin for an informal author meet and greet.

    Bring your books to get signed or purchase copies at the door. 

    Mako

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Meet you at the bar: Sourcing while female

    Speakers: Bethany Barnes of Tampa Bay Times; Alanna Autler of KTVT-Dallas; Maud Beelman of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Perla Trevizo of Houston Chronicle

    Tales of male journalists’ heroics dominate Hollywood. Now hear the untold stories of how female journalists hold power to account. Behind the scenes with experienced female journalists about how they get scoops, convince people to spill their guts and navigate instances where sources cross the line. Men in the newsroom especially welcome — learn how your colleagues get on page one.

    Crystal E

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Membership Meeting

    IRE Membership Meeting

    IRE Executive Director Doug Haddix and IRE Board President Matt Goldberg will hold an informational meeting and provide “The State of IRE” report for all IRE members at 5:30 p.m. in Oceans 9-12, located on the 1st floor of the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld.

    Oceans 9-12

    5:30 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    6:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Outside Event

    Oceans 9-12

    6:15 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Reception

    Closing reception

    Join us for a closing reception beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the Atrium located on the 1st floor of the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld and enjoy one last evening of catching up with old and new friends, speakers and colleagues.   

    Hors d' oeuvres and a cash bar will be available. Conference nametags are required for entry.

    Atrium

    6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Getting data into Excel

    Speaker: Lauryn Schroeder of San Diego Union-Tribune

    Data doesn’t always come in properly formatted Excel spreadsheets. Before you can analyze data in Excel, it first needs to be in a usable format. In this hands-on session, we will cover the importance of data types, delimiters and fixed-width columns to make the import process as smooth as possible. 

    This session is good for: Excel beginners, though anyone is welcome.

    Coral C

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    Investigating offshore finances, even when you don’t have a leak (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Sasha Chavkin of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Rawan Aldamen of Stream Media Consultancy; Spencer Woodman of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Mike McIntire of The New York Times

    In this panel, reporters who broke the Paradise Papers stories will give away their biggest secret: you don't need a large leak to effectively investigate the offshore world. We'll walk you through our methods of sifting through publicly available information to investigate the offshore world including tips on how to look for offshore stories and how to navigate publicly available foreign corporate registries. Plus, we'll show you how to trace ownership and financial flows in offshore structures and pull and analyze publicly accessible portions of nonprofit tax filings.

    Crystal AB

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Reporting on energy and the environment: Finding the narrative in the numbers

    Speakers: Madison Hopkins of Better Government Association; Carolyn Jarvis of Global News; Mike Soraghan of E&E News

    From industrial spills to the oversight of nuclear plants, to pipelines and fracking – learn how to dig deep on environmental and energy investigations in your part of the country. Panelists will cover how to get the data, how to translate that into a compelling story and how to get results. There will be take-home tips for broadcasters and print/online journalists alike on ways to humanize and visualize seemingly dry stories about science and industry and drive impact.

    Oceans 4

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Using solutions journalism to make your investigations stronger

    Speakers: Meg Kissinger of Columbia University; Tina Rosenberg of Solutions Journalism Network; Perla Trevizo of Houston Chronicle

    What’s more powerful than a great investigation? A great investigation that also takes away excuses — by showing how others are doing better. A solutions component can add big impact and engagement to an investigative series. 

    In this panel, investigative reporters will show how they bolstered their investigations of local wrongdoing by adding stories about other places doing better. And they’ll teach techniques for writing solutions stories with the same rigor and heft as the rest of the series.

    Oceans 3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Web scraping with Python

    Speaker: Matt Wynn of USA TODAY Network

    Need a spreadsheet but the information only exists on a web page? Learn how to scrape the data and build it yourself. This intro-level class will show you how to use the programming language Python to scrape simple web pages. We'll introduce you to the command line and show you how to write enough code to fetch, parse and analyze content from the web.

    This session is good for: Programming beginners. Some basic familiarity with HTML is helpful but not required.

    Coral A

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Create a searchable, sortable online table in a few easy steps

    Speaker: Cody Winchester of IRE and NICAR

    In this session, we'll use a template with a little Javascript to transform a Google spreadsheet into an interactive table that your readers can use to search and sort your data. (Getting the table into your newsroom CMS will probably be beyond the scope of this session, unfor tunately.) Note: You will need a Google Drive account. 

    Coral A

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Excel 2: Using formulas for stories (repeat)

    Speaker: Aimee Edmondson of Ohio University

    Much of Excel's power comes in the form of formulas. In this class, you'll learn how to use them to analyze data with the eye of a journalist. Yes, math will be involved, but it's totally worth it! This class will show you how calculations like change, percent change, rates and ratios can beef up your reporting.

    This session is good for: Anyone who is comfortable navigating Excel.

    Coral C

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    Hidden gems in international data (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: John Bones of SKUP Norway

    Whether you work in the United States or abroad, international data may bolster your stories, reveal hidden connections and inspire new leads. In this session, you'll learn about proven winners from journalists who've mined international data sets for watchdog and enterprise stories.

    Crystal AB

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Investigating housing

    Speakers: Kae Petrin of St. Louis Public Radio; Ray Rivera of The Seattle Times; Kim Barker of The New York Times; Vernal Coleman of The Seattle Times

    Take your housing stories beyond real estate coverage with tips on how to find bad landlords and rental conditions, public housing failures and housing discrimination.

    Oceans 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Work Better Track: The life-changing magic of getting organized

    Speakers: Sarah Hutchins of IRE and NICAR; Taylor Blatchford of The Seattle Times

    Is your desk so cluttered with papers, notes and files that you can’t see the top? Do you have trouble finding that perfect quote in a document somewhere on your computer? Do you start an investigation with ambitious plans for organization, only to promptly abandon them a few weeks in? This demo is for you! We’ll showcase our favorite old-school and new-school tools for taking notes and staying organized. Come prepared to share your favorite techniques and pick up a few new ones, too.

    Oceans 4

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Corrupt acts and autocrats: The year in international investigations

    Speakers: Guilherme Amado of Knight Fellow at Stanford University; David Kaplan of Global Investigative Journalism Network; Majdolin Hasan of Global Investigative Journalism Network

    The Trump phenomenon is but one facet of a global reaction against journalism and the truth. Come hear how your colleagues abroad are fighting back with extraordinary stories, holding power to account despite the worst kinds of corruption, crime and outright deceit. The panel will give a rapid-fire tour of inspired muckraking from the Middle East, Latin America and worldwide. 

    Oceans 4

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Excel 3: Filtering and pivot tables (repeat)

    Speaker: Jodi Upton of Syracuse University

    A look at spreadsheet filtering and the awesome power of pivot — and how to use it to analyze your dataset in minutes rather than hours.

    This session is good for: Anyone familiar with formulas, sorting and other basic tasks in Excel or another spreadsheet program.

    Coral C

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    Handling your next big email or document dump, FBI-style (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Aaron Kessler of CNN

    We've all been there: A big dump of documents and/or correspondence arrives, whether via a confidential source leaking you information or maybe just a hefty FOIA request that’s finally fulfilled. You're stuck trying to make sense of the mountain of information: Finding what's important, identifying those needles in the proverbial haystack, separating the wheat from the chaff. When law enforcement or intelligence agents face such a challenge, they turn to digital forensics for help. We'll cover how you can do the same without breaking the bank.

    Crystal AB

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Scraping without programming (repeat)

    Speaker: Samantha Sunne of independent journalist

    Scraping is a technical word for a traditional idea: getting ahold of information, whether your sources want you to or not. In this case, the information is data and the sources are websites. We'll go over some out-of-the-box tools for scraping data, plus some DIY techniques that often work even better.

    Coral A

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Using data and documents in your reporting

    Speakers: Mark Rochester of Detroit Free Press; Corey Johnson of Tampa Bay Times; Kathy Kiely of University of Missouri

    How to get in the document mindset and look for data and documents on all beats. We give specific examples of documents and data that are available and useful for investigative reporting.

    Oceans 3

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm