2016 CAR Conference

Join IRE and NICAR for our annual conference devoted to computer-assisted reporting. Come and learn about tools you need to dig deeper into stories and give readers and viewers the information they want.

For more information, visit our conference page.

Time and place

Thursday, Mar. 10, 2016 - Sunday, Mar. 13, 2016

Denver Marriott City Center
1701 California Street
Denver, Colorado 80202


Registration information

Registration for this event is open! Click here to begin.

Hurry! Registration closes on Sunday, Mar. 13 at 12:00pm.


Schedule details

  • Special Event

    Conference registration (Wednesday)

    Registration will be located on lower level 2 of the Denver Marriott City Center.

    Lower level 2

    1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Outside Event

    10 great business databases to mine for stories (Sponsored by Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism)

    Speaker: Steve Doig of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    Data journalist Stephen Doig, the Knight Chair at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, will demonstrate 10 data sources you may never have heard of that can lend rich context to your business and economic stories and spark meaningful investigations in this pre-conference workshop, sponsored by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism on Wednesday, March 9 from 2-5 p.m. 

    From ZIP code-level business patterns to foreign trade imports and exports and hospital data, Doig will walk you through seldom-used databases that hold treasures for reporters. You’ll learn what’s in the data sets, how to get them, what you can pull from them, what questions to ask of the data and story ideas that could be developed, and you’ll leave armed with new knowledge and fresh ideas.

    Registration for the workshop will begin at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 9.

    Sign up for this free workshop.

    Penrose

    2:00 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Outside Event

    Techraking <=16: Bootstrapping the News (Sponsored by Reveal/The Center for Investigative Reporting)

    Speakers: Michael Corey of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Scott Pham of BuzzFeed News; Eric Sagara of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

    Register now!

    Give us four hours and your laptop, and we’ll send you into NICAR with a fully-functioning data-crunching machine and the knowledge to use it.

    One of the biggest hurdles to learning programming is the often bewildering process of setting up your computer. Veteran data crunchers and programmers from Reveal/The Center for Investigative Reporting will give you a virtual playground on your personal laptop that will allow you to explore all the tools you'll gather throughout the conference. In this four-hour workshop, we’ll introduce crucial programming concepts and tools and -- most importantly -- why we use them.

    You’ll walk into conference sessions with a laptop loaded with many of the tools presenters will be talking about, and a leg up as you continue developing your skills once you're back home.

    Additional details including the schedule for the workshop can be found on the conference website.

    Register for this workshop.

    Denver III-IV

    2:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference sales (Thursday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. The winner of the IRE T-shirt contest will be displayed and on sale.

    Colorado B-D

    7:00 am - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference registration (Thursday)

    Registration will be located on lower level 2 of the Denver Marriott City Center.

    Lower level 2

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Welcome and overview of the conference

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Mark Horvit of University of Missouri; Alex Richards of NerdWallet; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    Welcome to the conference! IRE staff will highlight key sessions and events that you won't want to miss while in Denver. We'll also give you a brief rundown on some of the resources IRE has to offer.

    Colorado F

    8:30 am - 8:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Map Camp *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: David Herzog of IRE and NICAR; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Brian Peterson of Esri

    Learn how to uncover interesting news stories by mapping data with geographic information system (GIS) software during our intensive mini-boot camp and receive a free copy of ArcGIS Desktop*.

    IRE and NICAR trainers conduct this hands-on training using the latest version of ArcGIS Desktop. We will look at noteworthy stories that have used mapping and show you how to uncover stories using census and other data. You’ll learn how to display data geographically; import and query data; geocode to merge databases with addresses into maps. Attendees will also learn how ArcGIS Online may help as a storytelling platform. In addition, we'll provide you with our boot camp materials to help keep you on track long after you leave the conference. Participants should have basic knowledge in using relational database programs such as Microsoft Access. Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    *Attendees of the bootcamp have the option to receive the following discounts from Esri. (1) A free license of ArcGIS Desktop that will not expire and includes one year call-in technical support and upgrades at no cost. Call-in technical support and upgrades are available on a nominal fee basis in year two. (2) A free one-year subscription to ArcGIS Online that includes access to Esri's Community Analyst database. Please contact the Esri Media Relations team [email protected] for further information.

    This workshop is good for: Participants who have some experience working with data in a relational database manager, such as Microsoft Access or MySQL.

    Attendees must be registered for the conference to attend this workshop.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Gold Coin

    9:00 am - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    PyCAR *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Tom Meagher of The Marshall Project; Adriana Homolova of independent journalist; Alex Richards of NerdWallet; Scott Bradley of Northwestern University Knight Lab

    This hands-on workshop will teach journalists basic programming concepts using the Python language. The daylong class will introduce language basics and useful libraries in the course of a typical reporting project: scraping data from the Web, inserting it in a database and analyzing the results.

    Although the class is geared toward beginners, we'll assume that you're comfortable with databases and SQL and that you've hopefully seen a command line since the days of DOS. Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    This workshop is good for: Attendees who have familiarity with the command line and are comfortable with databases and SQL.

    Attendees must be registered for the conference to attend this workshop.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Mattie Silks

    9:00 am - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Interactive data graphics in Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Ben Jones of Tableau Software

    Learn how to create beautiful, interactive data visualizations on short deadlines. No programming required. You'll learn everything you need to build data visualizations and publish them to your website just like a video. We'll teach you how to:

    •Connect to Excel files and other data
    •Create maps and charts
    •Make them interactive
    •Publish them on your site

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. No previous experience with Tableau is necessary to take this class. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the CAR Conference to attend this class. Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class

    Independence

    9:00 am - 10:30 am

  • Panel

    Are you smarter than a fifth grader?

    Speakers: Lindsey Cook of U.S. News & World Report; Ashlyn Still of Reuters

    Learn coding concepts like elementary schoolers learn them — through interactive games and activities that will get you out of your chair — instead of by watching slides and typing unknown symbols into a text editor. You'll learn programming concepts such as loops, types, variables, syntax, and if/then statements that translate to any language and leave with a list of resources for starting to program in the language best suited for your needs. If you identity as a "math hater" and think you could never learn to program, this is the session for you to learn otherwise.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Denver III & IV

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Cleaning data with OpenRefine

    Speakers: Robert Gebeloff of The New York Times; Nils Mulvad of Kaas & Mulvad

    OpenRefine is the best tool to clean really dirty data -- the kind of data in which the same name might be spelled in 30 different ways. It has built-in cleaning tools for analysts and journalists.

    Denver VI

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    Data verification

    Speaker: Giannina Segnini of Columbia Journalism School

    Journalists have more access to information than ever before. The rise in the volume and speed of data production might be overwhelming for some journalists, many of whom are not used to using large amounts of data for research and storytelling. But the urgency and eagerness to make use of data, and the technology available to process it, should not distract us from our underlying quest for accuracy. This session will show you techniques to fully capture the value of data and to evaluate its quality.

    Penrose

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Colorado B-D

    9:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Fusion Tables: Beginner

    Speaker: Joe Yerardi of The Center for Public Integrity

    Welcome to Google Fusion Tables. In this hands-on introduction to the free online tool you'll learn how to import and combine data, do simple analysis and easily turn that into an online map. We'll explore using Fusion Table as a toolbox for reporting and online storytelling.

    This session will be most useful if: You've ever used a spreadsheet and you have a Google account.

    Denver II

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Getting started: Intro to CAR and the conference

    Speakers: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News; Lisa Pickoff-White of KQED Public Radio

    Are you new to data journalism or does this happen to be your first time at a CAR conference? Is it time to up your game but you're not sure how to take the next step? If so, this session will help you get on track to make sure that you get the best experience possible from the 2016 CAR Conference. We'll highlight sessions and give you tips for success during and after the conference. This session is good for: Those new to data journalism or the CAR Conference.

    Colorado F

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to D3

    Speakers: Chris Canipe of Axios; Jon McClure of Politico

    Learn the basics of using D3 to make customized, elegant data visualizations. This JavaScript library gives you the power to draw online by harnessing the power of SVGs. We'll explain what makes D3 so great and demonstrate a step-by-step guide for making a chart that you can put to work in your own newsroom.

    This session is good for: Those with some JavaScript knowledge.

    Denver I

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to database manager MySQL I

    Speaker: Paula Lavigne of ESPN

    Plenty of data these days come in large or relational tables that require a good database manager, beyond what Excel and even Access can offer. MySQL is a free, powerful, and popular open-source tool, and with it you can transform and analyze almost any dataset. In this class, we will introduce you to MySQL and how it works. Please note that we cannot help you install it here.

    This session will be most helpful if: You have some experience working with data in columns and rows, and are familiar with SQL

    Denver V

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Ruby

    Speaker: Tiff Fehr of The New York Times

    Join us to learn Ruby's approach and how you can jump into Ruby without too much head-bashing. We’ll cover how Ruby does common programming concepts like assignments, conditionals, iteration and app setup.

    Suggested technical experience: Comfort with another programming language or two would be helpful, although general familiarity with of coding concepts like variables, conditional logic and loops will work well.

    Matchless

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    The way we look next: Mining past and future census data to predict diversity in race, income and aging

    Speakers: Joe Germuska of Northwestern University Knight Lab; Paul Overberg of The Wall Street Journal; Jodi Upton of Syracuse University; Stephanie Ewert of U.S. Census Bureau

    **Moderated by Jodi Upton, USA TODAY

    The idea of a melting pot nation has gotten a lot of attention over the years, but is it really true? Whether it’s race, ethnicity, income, gender or other issues that separate us, how do we measure whether (and where) we are growing apart or together over the next few decades? Three experts will walk you through how to find the right detailed tables in the Census, how to build an index that can be used to compare nearly anything, and what the Census categories really mean (including whether we will really be majority-minority by mid-century).

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado G-J

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    What time, patience & a little OCD can teach you about the interactive news landscape

    Speakers: Troy Griggs of The New York Times; Ken Schwencke of ProPublica

    Since April 11th, 2012, I have been collecting every example of interactive news and alternative storytelling forms in a simple spreadsheet. The goal was to better understand how both large- and small-scale news organizations used nontraditional methods of storytelling and what worked or did not work. As of 2015, I have collected over 4,600 projects and gained a pretty good understanding of the arc of interactive news over time, from the organizational level to the personal level. I'd like to formally present the document and lead a discussion on what could be gleaned from it.

     

    Colorado E

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    30 (maybe 20) ideas for local energy stories that use data sets that you can access RIGHT NOW

    Speakers: Dan Boyce of Inside Energy; Stephanie Joyce of Inside Energy; Leigh Paterson of Inside Energy; Jordan Wirfs-Brock of Inside Energy

    Energy is the spinach of the media world - it's an important topic, but no one really wants it on their plate. But did you know that there’s a dataset compiling the number of times squirrels have chewed through power lines and caused blackouts? From the oil coming out of the ground to the electrons flowing out of your wall socket, energy stories are everywhere. In this rapid-fire session, we’ll share story ideas and datasets you can uncover in your own community, as well as ways to turn the spinach into an aperitif.

    Penrose

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Animated videos for storytelling

    Speaker: Kavya Sukumar of Vox Media

    Often, complex ideas in a story don't get the attention they deserve because, let’s face it, you’re allowed only one lede. Short animated videos are a great way to remedy this. They can bubble up interesting content in an easily shareable form that works on most devices and social media platforms. In this session, learn to create and publish your own animated video from scratch.

    This session is good for beginners who are new to making videos as well as for people with some experience in video production looking to add animation to your skill set. This workshop also introduces the basics of Adobe Expressions, a javascript like language, to control animation.

    Denver VI

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Special Event

    Conversations: My own worst enemy - Overcoming imposter syndrome (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitated by Kate Martin, The News Tribune 

    Did you ever get the feeling that you're a fraud and it's only a matter of time before someone finds out? Congratulations! You have impostor syndrome. This talk in a small group will explore the causes of impostor syndrome and how to avoid beating yourself up over small setbacks. At the same time, the most ridiculously under-qualified people seem to have the biggest egos. What can we learn from them? Do they just care less? (Please bring your tips because this speaker is not sure she's qualified to host this talk.)

    Colorado A

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Designing database applications to increase page views and ad revenues (Hosted by Caspio)

    Speaker: Edward Garcia of Caspio, Inc.

    With journalists facing increasing pressure to create data interactives that engage more readers, it’s important to optimize data-driven applications for interactivity, traffic, and page views. Learn how to design and deploy revenue-generating applications that will continue to serve as long-lasting data assets. This demo will showcase real-world examples and techniques for building “share-worthy” hyper-local applications. Technologies covered: Caspio, Google maps, AJAX, location proximity, CDN, data feeds, SEO, and cross-channel deployment (web, mobile and social).

    Note: Pre-registration is not required, but is recommended to receive your free Caspio account pre-loaded with demo apps for the session.

    Click here to sign up.

    This session is good for: Everyone.

    Denver I

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Finding stuff online: A journalist's guide to tracking down information

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Mark Horvit of University of Missouri

    There is more to Web research than Google (though Google is nice). In this fast-paced session we'll show you our tricks for discovering information online using Google advanced searches, lesser-known search engines, deep web searches and more.

    Colorado G-J

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to database manager MySQL II

    Speaker: Tim Henderson of The Pew Charitable Trusts

    After showing you the lay of the land with MySQL I, we'll take you through some of the more powerful features and tools at your disposal, and show you where to go if you want to learn more. This session will be most helpful if: You took "Intro to database manager MySQL I", or have some experience with open source database managers and SQL.

    Denver V

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Same as it ever was? New approaches to the same old data

    Speakers: Chase Davis of Star Tribune; Ryan McNeill of Reuters; John Perry of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Test scores. Weather. Census. Elections. There are some data stories that we're always going to have to tackle. In this session, listen to three veterans talk about ways they took the "same old, same old" and turned it on its head. You'll come away with fresh ideas and techniques for digging into familiar stories. This session is good for anyone.

    Colorado F

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Teaching data journalism and computer-assisted reporting: Your best ideas

    Speakers: Meredith Broussard of New York University; Brant Houston of University of Illinois

    **Moderated by Meredith Broussard, New York University & Brant Houston, University of Illinois

    What works best when teaching college-level computer-assisted reporting or data journalism courses? Find out in this session featuring a series of 5-minute lightning talks dedicated to teaching students how to use data in journalism. Instructors will highlight successful approaches, best teaching techniques, data for students, and more. The following talks will be included:

    • *Meredith Broussard, New York University - Professor Sysadmin: How to privately publish problem sets in data journalism classes
    • *Danielle Cervantes, Point Loma Nazarene University - Le Morte d'Arthur: Or How I Used the Sudden Death of My Dog to Teach Backgrounding with Data and Docs
    • *Steve Doig, ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism - Hunting for data easter eggs
    • *Aimee Edmondson, Ohio University - Keeping the zombies out of my classroom: Data for the college crowd
    • *Jeff Kelly Lowenstein, Columbia College Chicago - Teaching students through their stomachs
    • *Scott Klein, ProPubica - Make it stick with quizzes
    • *Christian McDonald, Austin American-Statesman - Regular expressions
    • *Matt Waite, University of Nebraska-Lincoln - Python/Jupyter Notebooks/Agate as the tool chain we really need

    Denver III-IV

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Tools to handle PDFs

    Speaker: Acton Gorton of Chicago Tribune

    This class will cover basic approaches for getting text out of PDF documents using powerful and freely available tools. Participants will be introduced to basic concepts and walked-through tackling common challenges encountered with tricky PDF documents.

    This class is best for: People who are unfamiliar with the PDF to text tools or would like to learn how optical character recognition (OCR) tools can be used for extracting difficult text from images embedded in PDF documents.

    Denver II

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    What the hell is D3 and all the other questions you're afraid to ask?

    Speakers: Tisha Thompson of ESPN; Sisi Wei of ProPublica

    Ever wondered what people are talking about at this conference? What exactly is D3 and why you would want to use it? What is the difference between Ruby, Python and Javascript? And why is there a J in front of Query? Welcome to our no-judgment-starting-at-step-zero session even NICAR vets can use. We'll review tech concepts and jargon you'll likely hear at NICAR this year, explain what they mean, why they're useful and point you to the sessions that can teach you the terms you now understand.

    This session is good for: Anyone who has felt lost in the sea of technical terminology.

    Colorado E

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Working with data in Ruby

    Speaker: Jacqui Maher of BBC News

    This session will cover using Ruby to explore data with an emphasis on JSON. Join us to learn about the Ruby approach to reading and parsing JSON data from files and APIs. We'll also look at how to inspect, filter, select and perform calculations "the Ruby way."

    Suggested technical experience: familiarity with the Unix terminal and running executable files would be helpful. I'll cover this briefly at the start if necessary. Doing the "Intro to Ruby" workshop would be useful but not required for this session. 

    Bonus material: if time allows - or there is interest (speak up, future workshop attendees!), I'd love to cover formats other than JSON, like csv or xml. I'd also like to show how to generate JSON for use in data visualizations and interactives.

     

    Matchless

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Advanced design and interaction in Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Jewel Loree of Tableau Software

    Analyzing data and coming up interactive visualizations is easy in Tableau but sometimes getting everything looking polished isn’t. In this session you will learn how to break away from the default formatting in Tableau Public to create interactive data graphics that match your style guides and engage your readers. We will teach you how to:

    •change colors, shapes, borders, fonts, and other basic formatting
    •incorporate images, logos, and other graphic elements
    •take advantage of advanced interaction techniques to incorporate multimedia
    •utilize design and layout best practices to make sure that your visualization looks polished and professional

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. Some familiarity with the product is recommended; a beginner session earlier in the day should prepare you enough for this session. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the CAR Conference to attend this class. Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class

    Independence

    11:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Basic Ruby web apps with Sinatra

    Speaker: Jacob Harris of 18F

    This class focuses on using a simple, popular framework for creating web applications with Ruby called Sinatra. After you've learned enough Ruby to work with a set (or sets) of data and clean it up, Sinatra can help you turn it into something your readers can interact with.

    This class will be most useful if: You attended the earlier Ruby classes or have previous Ruby experience.

    Matchless

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Best practices for scraping: From ethics to techniques

    Speakers: Ricardo Brom of La Nacion; David Eads of ProPublica Illinois; Amanda Hickman of Factful; Martin Burch of The Wall Street Journal

    **Moderated by Martin Burch, The Wall Street Journal

    If you can see it online, you can download it to your computer, but should you? Our panelists share the consequences of their scraping efforts, good and bad, and invite your questions. We’ll review common ethical questions and show best technical practices as we walk through building a web scraper.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado F

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Rank that list, what JSchool Students need to know (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitated by Lindsey Cook, U.S. News & World Report

    What should j-school students learn about data, coding and graphics? You have one class to cram in everything students need to know about data, coding, graphics and the web. Yes, it shouldn't be this way, but it is at many schools. I'll bring some course outlines and a list of skills as a starting point. The goal: ranking each skill from most important to least for the average j-school student. Depending on the number of people, we may break up into smaller groups and then see how closely lists match at the end.

    Colorado A

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Data for breaking news

    Speakers: John Keefe of Quartz; Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area

    What will you do the next time a plane crashes, the big storm hits or a politician gets caught in a scandal? We'll show you how you can prepare for the next big story using dashboards, searchable databases and more. We’ll also help you cover daily, general and everyday news by building your toolbox so you can use these techniques any time.

    This session is good for: Anyone.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado E

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Excel for business and economics

    Speaker: Aaron Kessler of CNN

    Whether you just started using Excel or it's been your companion for years, chances are there's a lot it can do you've never realized. We sometimes think of Excel as the stepping stone to database managers like Access or SQL Server, and overlook just how powerful its tools can be -- especially if you're covering business and economics. Come find out why Excel is still so popular in the business world and we'll unlock some of its secrets. The people you're covering know these tricks - you should too.

    This session is good for: People who understand Excel basics but want to unlock powerful functions for analyzing businesses.

    Denver V

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Health care

    Speakers: Ryann Grochowski Jones of ProPublica; Charles Ornstein of ProPublica

    In this hands-on class, you’ll explore several large public health care datasets and leave knowing how to find the stories in them. Excel proficiency is a must (you should already know how to sort and filter your data and create pivot tables). We’ll look at pharmaceutical payments to doctors, payments to doctors in the Medicare Part B program and nursing home deficiency data.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Denver I

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    FOIA Tricks

    Speaker: Jason Leopold of BuzzFeed News

    Spend an hour learning tips, tricks and techniques for requesting government documents from an investigative reporter known for his aggressive use of the Freedom of Information Act.

    Penrose

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to the command line (PC)

    Speaker: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    If you’ve never touched the little black box on your computer known as the command line, you’re ignoring an extremely helpful tool. In this session you'll learn how to make the command line work for you and make it become a handy tool in your data toolbelt.

    This session is good for: Newbies to the command line who are brave enough to dive into the guts of their computer. Most but not all of this session’s content translates to Macs. If you’re a Mac user, see "Intro to the command line (Unix)."

    Denver VI

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating the legal marijuana trade

    Speakers: Chris Koeberl of Fox31 Denver; Katie Wilcox of KUSA/9News Denver; Laura Frank of Rocky Mountain PBS

    **Moderated by Laura Frank, Rocky Mountain PBS

    Panelists will give you the tools you need to understand and investigate the business of marijuana. Where can you find out the number of employees, facilities, status, revenue, etc.? How do you report on an industry in your state that contradicts federal law? What investigations have been done on this topic? We'll point attendees towards the wide amount of data available and offer cautionary tales for working with that data.

    Denver III & IV

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Solving setup and deployment with (docker) containers

    Speaker: Eric Buth

    Learn the basics of containerization and how it can help mitigate the complexity of getting your code online. We’ll cover local set-up, build processes, and multi-container compositions, and discuss options for deployment and distribution.

    This class is designed with beginners in mind and has no prerequisites.

    Denver II

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    The data behind the pixel

    Speakers: Eric Sagara of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Al Shaw of ProPublica

    Satellite data provides a bird's eye view of the world and allows us to examine things such as conflict, pollution, climate change, natural disasters and even slave trade. There are a lot of data products out there – some for free, others that cost money. This session will give a brief overview of the different types of satellite data available – from NASA's MODIS and LANDSAT satellites, to private offerings such as Planet Labs. We will provide a brief overview of how to search for the data and download it using a variety of tools. Additionally, we’ll talk about analyzing pixel quality and processing data for both true color and false color imagery.

    Colorado G-J

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Automation v. humanization (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitated by Gerald Rich, Vocativ

    What are some of the problems we can't solve with computer code and Slackbots? How about editing features? Or general reporting? Why or why not? Take a minute to think outside the box and speculate about what the future holds for computer/human-assisted reporting, and how humans do or don't fit into that picture.

    Colorado A

    12:45 pm - 1:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding and telling data stories with Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Dash Davidson of Tableau Software

    Got a dataset and an impending deadline to write a story on it? Find the scoop and convey it with beautiful, interactive visualizations in a serial narrative using Tableau Public. It’s a fast, easy to use, and free tool for journalists. Visualizations will publish using any CMS and no programming is required. 

    We’ll teach you how to:

    •Connect to Excel files and other file types
    •Rapidly explore and analyze datasets with ease
    •Make eye-catching visualizations to share your findings
    •Add interactivity and arrange them in a serial narrative to engage and sustain your audience’s attention

    No previous experience with Tableau is necessary to attend. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the CAR Conference to attend this class. Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class

    Independence

    1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

  • Panel

    Algorithmic accountability: Case studies from the field

    Speakers: Nicholas Diakopoulos of Northwestern University; Jennifer Stark of University of Maryland; Jeff Larson of The Markup

    Algorithms are everywhere in industry and government, making decisions that impact people’s lives through everything from discrimination and censorship to voting and democracy itself. Algorithmic accountability reporting is an emerging set of methods for investigating how algorithms exert influence and power in society. In this session we’ll detail concrete investigations in this domain that are underway or have been published already. Strategies, methods, and techniques for pursuing algorithmic accountability reporting will be discussed.

    Colorado E

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Analyzing networks with Gephi

    Speaker: Peter Aldhous of BuzzFeed News

    Gephi is an open source platform for network analysis (aka social network analysis), allowing you to produce publication-quality vector graphics and to export your analyses for interactive online visualization. You'll learn how to use the software by turning data on voting patterns in the U.S. Senate into an informative graphic revealing the chamber's underlying dynamics.

    No prior experience of network analysis required.

    Denver II

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Demo

    Autotune: Making reusable graphics

    Speakers: Casey Miller of Mapbox; Kavya Sukumar of Vox Media

    Autotune is Vox Media's open source tool for managing reusable apps and graphics. More on it here (https://source.opennews.org/en-US/articles/introducing-autotune/) and here (github.com/voxmedia/autotune/wiki). This session will walk you through how you can use Autotune to take your apps and graphics from one-off to reusable. It will also walk the audience through how code can potentially be shared across newsrooms easily.

    Penrose

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Command line tools for reporters (PC)

    Speaker: Karrie Kehoe

    Ever struggled with large data sets? Want something more than excel or SQL but don’t know where to start with the command line? We will show you how to harness the awesome power of CSVKit to wrangle large datasets on the command line. It's easy to use, fast and powerful. It's a must in every data journalist's technical tool box.

    Denver I

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: News Nerd Book Club for "Information Doesn't Want to be Free - Laws for the Internet Age" (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitated by Ben Keith, Institute for Nonprofit News

    Join the News Nerd Book Club in discussing Cory Doctorow's "Information Doesn't Want to be Free: Laws for the Internet Age" and pie. We'll start with Doctorow's second law: "Fame won't make you rich, but you can't get paid without it." For more details, follow @newsnerdbooks on Twitter and read the announcement blog post: http://nerds.inn.org/2016/02/24/the-march-book-club-selection-information-doesnt-want-to-be-free/

    Colorado A

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Election: Making the most out of campaign finance and election APIs

    Speakers: Sam Cohen of The Associated Press; Derek Willis of ProPublica; Lindsay Young of 18F; Matt Della Volpe of The Associated Press

    There are more APIs for political data than ever before, but with more options comes uncertainty about the best tool for the job. Learn the details of several elections and campaign finance APIs from the developers who maintain them, what they offer and how you can use them in your newsroom.

    Colorado F

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Getting started with Excel

    Speaker: Caelainn Barr of The Guardian

    In this introduction to spreadsheets you'll begin analyzing data with Excel, a simple but powerful tool. You'll learn how to enter data, sort it and conduct simple calculations like average and median. Time allowing, you'll even learn to create a basic Google map using data from spreadsheets.

    This session is good for: Data beginners. It will be most useful if you have a Google account.

    Denver VI

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to sensor journalism with arduinos

    Speaker: Linda Sandvik of Knight-Mozilla OpenNews

    Learn how to make simple, interactive projects using Arduino hardware. We'll walk through a couple of easy projects to give you a feel for what's possible and show a few examples of what other news organisations have used it for. We'll have a few Arduinos on hand to share but you can bring your own. We won't be soldering and no previous coding experience required. Laptops are provided.

    Open to anyone who likes to play and make things blink.

    Matchless

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Mining college scorecard data (Sponsored by Lumina Foundation)

    Speakers: Andrea Fuller of The Wall Street Journal; Annie Waldman of ProPublica

    With student debt at a record $1.3 trillion, what are students getting for all that money? We'll take you through the ins-and-outs of the new College Scorecard, a treasure trove of data released for the first time last fall. Learn how to pull data on colleges in your region including college costs, graduation rates, loan repayments rates, and the salaries earned by graduates.

    Denver III & IV

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Stats: An introduction

    Speaker: Norm Lewis of University of Florida

    Statisticians need to understand their data (and so do you!) before they begin running analyses. As a result, statistical software packages such as PSPP and SPSS have many powerful tools to summarize your data. You're going to love them. We'll take a look at the structure of data in PSPP, do data transformations and run some basic statistical tests.

    This session will be most helpful if: You have familiarity with Excel and some database software. We've got a lot of ground to cover in this hour.

    Denver V

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Tracking government spending

    Speakers: Colby Goodman of Center for International Policy; Kate Martin of Carolina Public Press; Nate Carlisle of The Salt Lake Tribune; Lee Zurik of WVUE-New Orleans

    **Moderated by Nate Carlisle, The Salt Lake Tribune

    Return to your newsroom knowing where to find money the local, state and federal government is spending in your neighborhood, on your school district, on your campus, or in foreign countries. Learn which companies are receiving the money, too. Find police purchases of high-tech surveillance equipment, see which countries and causes receive foreign aid and learn to cross reference these sources. With basic Excel skills and these tips, you can craft enlightening reports for your readers and viewers.

    Colorado G-J

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Designing Tableau visualizations for mobile (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Dash Davidson of Tableau Software

    Are mobile readers of your news site becoming more and more common? If your news organization is like others we’ve worked with, the percent of readers using phones and tablets to read your content is well over half of the overall number, and growing fast. Creating data visualizations for these small form-factors is very challenging. Learn how to use Tableau to create sheets and dashboards that work great, even on phones and tablets. 

    •Design considerations, including layout and formatting
    •Dashboard sizing for a range of screen widths
    •Interactivity – filtering and tooltips
    •Options to embed visualizations to respond to reader device

    Some experience with Tableau Public is recommended. Taking one of the earlier Tableau sessions should suffice. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the CAR Conference to attend this class. Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class

    Independence

    3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Panel

    Deep dives

    Speakers: John Bones of SKUP Norway; Reuben Fischer-Baum of FiveThirtyEight; Dhrumil Mehta of FiveThirtyEight; Adam Playford of Tampa Bay Times; Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV

    **Moderated by Jill Riepenhoff, The Columbus Dispatch

    In this session, a group of data journalists will give us a closer look at the following: *How the Tampa Bay Times used data to explain how Pinellas County schools failed black children in the Philip Meyer Award winning Failure Factories. *Working with geospatial data: A case study in how not to do it wrong

    *Making numbers shine in features journalism

    Denver III & IV

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    From arrest to sentencing: How to analyze trends and make comparisons in crime stats (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)

    Speakers: Chad Day of The Associated Press; Kim English of Colorado Division of Criminal Justice; Paula Lavigne of ESPN; Ted Gest of Criminal Justice Journalists

    **Moderated by Ted Gest, Criminal Justice Journalists

    This panel will cover a variety of criminal justice issues. One journalist will discuss the "veil of secrecy" of juvenile justice systems and how we can obtain data showing how youths are being treated there; another will talk about how comparing crime stats across jurisdictions may have less to do with actual crime and more to do with state laws, police attitudes, public records laws and community sensibilities. A state official will tell us about a handful of key resources for accessing statistics on crime and the justice system's response, highlighting the value of available data and the challenges public officials face in answering key questions. Finally, we'll learn about the third edition of a book IRE is publishing now on "Understanding Crime Statistics."

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado F

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Grabbing data from websites without scraping

    Speaker: Samantha Sunne of independent journalist

    We'll show you how to get websites to give up structured data. Programming knowledge isn't required but you'll learn why it's good to have. Required software is just a web browser and some free tools and add-ons we'll tell you about.

    Prerequisites: Solid excel. Sneakiness and Nosiness

    Denver I

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Special Event

    How to build reporting tools so reporters will use them

    Speaker: Jeremy Merrill of Quartz

    For search, for transcription, for databases and for ______________, we're building more tools for reporters to use on their own. Let's talk about our experiences designing these tools, building them and promoting them internally.

    Colorado A

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    I always feel like somebody's watchin' me

    Speakers: Jeff Larson of The Markup; Quinn Norton of independent journalist; Andy Boyle of Axios

    **Moderated by Andy Boyle, NBC News, Breaking News

    Security and you -- what are the biggest problems facing journalists and others in the face of the NSA trying to spy on everything everyone does? Not to mention, how do you protect yourself from the NSA, foreign governments and other bad actors (l33t [email protected]!!!) looking to steal your company's (and your audience's) data. How to protect your sources, yourself and your readers, too.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado G-J

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Demo

    Key data for all of your stories

    Speakers: David Hiles of Bureau of Labor Statistics; Maria Olmedo-Malagon of U.S. Census Bureau; Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters

    **Moderated by Jaimi Dowdell, IRE/NICAR

    In this session we'll take a close look at data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Bureau of Labor Statistics and more. How can demographic, employment and wage data help you better understand your community? We'll discuss cool data tools, limitations and more.

    Penrose

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Overview

    Speaker: Jonathan Stray of Columbia Journalism School

    Overview is an open source reporting tool built to handle thousands or millions of documents. It syncs to a folder on your computer and automatically uploads, OCRs, and indexes your document files from many formats. In this workshop you'll learn to search, visualize, find entities, map topics, and tag and cull your own document collections. Overview has been used to track stolen maple syrup, uncover bribes to a president, and on both the winner and finalist for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in public service. Come learn how these and other stories were reported and get some hands-on time to prepare you for your own winning stories.

    Denver II

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Stats: Linear regression

    Speaker: Ryan McNeill of Reuters

    ​Go beyond counting and sorting. Learn how (and when) to measure relationships, level playing fields and make predictions.

    This session will be most useful if: You took 'Stats: An introduction' and want to know how to apply what you learned, or are comfortable with summary statistics and PSPP or SPSS and new to stats. Familiarity with spreadsheets and database managers is recommended.

    Denver V

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Stealth project management: How to get work done even if you're not "technically" in charge

    Speakers: Erika Owens of Knight-Mozilla OpenNews; Pattie Reaves of Bangor Daily News; Hanna Sender of International Business Times

    Some aspects of newsroom workflow are really well defined and documented. And others, well, let's say they're more flexible. Especially when it comes to working on the web, it can sometimes take some pretty creative thinking to make sure what needs to get done, gets done clearly, correctly, and quickly. You'll learn some tactics that have worked in different types of newsrooms and develop a newfound respect for the magical management elves who help our teams function.

    Colorado E

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Using formulas in Excel

    Speaker: Juan Lyon of ----0000 Institution Not Present 0000----

    Much of Excel's power comes in the form of formulas. In this class you'll learn how to use them to analyze data with the eye of a journalist. Yes, math will be involved, but it's totally worth it! This class will show you how calculations like change, percent change, rates and ratios can beef up your reporting.

    This session is good for: Data beginners.

    Denver VI

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    What's the story with algorithms?

    Speakers: Nicholas Diakopoulos of Northwestern University; Jennifer Stark of University of Maryland

    In this follow-up to the “Algorithmic Accountability: Case Studies from the Field” session we’ll collaboratively brainstorm newsworthy algorithms that are deserving of investigation. Then we’ll work in small groups to begin detailing how we would go about the investigation: what data needs to be gathered and how would it be sampled, what types of analysis would be most interesting, and what newsworthy nugget would we be looking for? Participants in this interactive workshop should expect to go home with a set of promising ideas for algorithmic accountability stories.

    Matchless

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    A candid discussion on when and how data journalists disclose their methods

    Speakers: Christopher Groskopf of Quartz; Stuart Thompson of The Wall Street Journal; Ryann Grochowski Jones of ProPublica; Aaron Williams of The Washington Post; Stuart Thompson of The Wall Street Journal

    **Moderated by Christopher Groskopf, Quartz

    While a data journalist's toolkit is becoming more and more complex, the responsibility to disclose and explain our methods remains a bit murky. How do we explain to a lay audience our usage of models or machine learning techniques? What if there is an error in a library we used to perform our analysis? What do readers need to understand about our techniques to properly interpret the results of our analysis? Should we publish source/raw data? These are a few of the questions we will raise and attempt to answer — with your help. Audience participation will be an important part of this session. Let's figure out some transparency best practices for data journalists.

    Colorado E

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced data cleaning with Python: Machine learning techniques

    Speakers: Cathy Deng of independent journalist; Forest Gregg of DataMade

    People and corporations are of interest to reporters, but data about them are often messy. Fundamentally, natural language lacks structure and the same thing can be represented in many different ways. In many cases, simple deterministic approaches (e.g. regex) can't get you very far. We'll show you some of the powerful tools that DataMade uses to efficiently clean and link the worst data, including dedupe, usaddress, and probablepeople

    Prereqs: Comfort with python

    Denver II

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Building VR interactives with Three.js

    Speaker: Armand Emamdjomeh of The Washington Post

    Lights, camera, liftoff! In this session we'll learn how to create a three-dimensional virtual reality scene using Three.js and Mars terrain data from NASA. 

    Using the L.A. Times's "Discovering Gale Crater" interactive, we'll walk you through how to import elevation data, turn a flat plane into a geographic surface, and map a terrain texture (basically a high-resolution photograph) onto that object. Then, we'll learn how to integrate controls for desktop and mobile devices, and how to use pre-existing elements to turn the 3D scene into a virtual reality experience.   

    If time permits, we'll also brainstorm ways to improve current VR efforts, and how to lower the bar for implementing VR and 3D interactives in newsrooms. 

    Matchless

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    Lessons from a computational political scientist

    Speakers: Amber Boydstun of University of California - Davis; Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    **Sarah Cohen, The New York Times (moderator)

    When reporters take on document analysis, we sometimes forget that content analysis has been a mainstay of political and other social sciences for generations. We'll learn about both traditional and cutting edge techniques from Amber Boydstun, a political scientist at the University of California at Davis whose projects include finding jokes in Federal Reserve meeting transcripts and media agenda-setting analysis.

    Colorado F

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    PivotTables in Excel

    Speaker: Andrew Chavez of The Dallas Morning News

    A look at the awesome power of pivot - and how to use it to analyze your dataset in minutes rather than hours.

    This session will be most helpful if: You are familiar with formulas in Excel or another spreadsheet program.

    Denver VI

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Stats: Logistic regression

    Speaker: Ted Mellnik of The Washington Post

    Linear regression helps you find relationships between two or more variables, but when an outcome has only two possibilities, you need a different tool. That, my friends, is where logistic regression comes in.

    This session will be most useful if: You took 'Stats: An introduction', or are comfortable with summary statistics and PSPP or SPSS. Familiarity with spreadsheets and database managers is recommended.

    Denver V

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    The value of emerging (and failed) tech

    Speakers: Robert Hernandez of University of Southern California - Annenberg; Matt Waite of University of Nebraska - Lincoln

    Google Wave. Second Life. Yo! Google Glass. Is there value in developing on emerging technology, even though the tech may fail? In this #wjchat-style session, we’ll share the stories and lessons learned from early adoption. Bring your CueCat.

    Colorado G-J

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Visualization and analysis in Python

    Speaker: Roberto Rocha of CBC

    So you know a bit of Python, you’ve scraped a site or two, and got some data with it. Now get quick insights out of that data by visualizing it right inside of Python. This course will teach you how to make quick exploratory charts using matplotlib, a powerful and versatile graphing library, using the handy iPython Notebook (Jupyter) environment. You’ll also learn how to export these charts to hand over to a designer or straight to publication.

    Suggested experience: You should have some basic knowledge of programming, preferably in Python.

    Denver I

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Demo

    Web scraping without programming

    Speakers: Robert Gebeloff of The New York Times; Tom Johnson of Institute for Analytic Journalism

    Web scraping without programming The data's there. But it's trapped in an unfriendly format. In this session, we'll show you how to use free and easy tools to liberate information from various formats common to the Web ( HTML, PDF, JSON, XML) and get it into a format more ideal for data analysis.

    Penrose

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Reception

    Welcome reception

    Kick off the conference with a welcome reception on Thursday night beginning at 6 p.m. Meet up with friends you have not seen since last year and welcome new attendees. Each attendee will receive one drink ticket for beer, wine, soda or bottled water.

    Denver III-IV

    6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference registration (Friday)

    Registration will be located on lower level 2 of the Denver Marriott City Center.

    Lower level 2

    8:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference sales (Friday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. The winner of the IRE T-shirt contest will be displayed and on sale.

    Colorado B-D

    8:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Build your first news app *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Ben Welsh of Los Angeles Times; Derek Willis of ProPublica

    This mini-boot camp will walk you through the process of building a simple, useful online news application from a dataset. You will get hands-on experience in every stage of the development process, writing Python, HTML and JavaScript using version control tools. You won't stop until you've deployed a working application onto the World Wide Web. 

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    Session prerequisites: If you have a good attitude and know how to take a few code crashes in stride, you are qualified for this class.

    Attendees must be registered for the conference to attend this workshop.

    Workshop times are Friday and Saturday morning from 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Independence

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intermediate Python *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Serdar Tumgoren of Stanford University; Eric Sagara of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

    You’ve written a few Python scripts that get the job done, but the initial euphoria has worn off. Your code is hard to understand. Bugs are cropping up. Worse, you can’t always explain your process or results to an editor — or yourself. There must be a better way, but the path forward is not clear. If you’ve had that itchy feeling, this half-day, hands-on workshop is for you.

    After mastering the basics of writing code, you need to understand how to design programs. To that end, this class will explore Python language features that will help you write readable, reliable and reusable code.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    Session prerequisites: Experience with basic Python language features like variables, data types, conditionals and functions are required. 

    Attendees must be registered for the conference to attend this session.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Mattie Silks

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Agate for data analysis in Python

    Speaker: Matt Waite of University of Nebraska - Lincoln

    In this hands-on session we'll introduce you to programmatic data analysis with the agate module for Python. We'll go through the basics—reading CSV files, transforming data, and running basic statistical analysis—while leaving plenty of room for your questions. This session is ideal for folks with some Python experience, especially those who've reached the limits of what they can do with tools like csvkit, but find pandas and numpy bewildering.

    Denver II

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Amazon cloud basics

    Speaker: Scott Klein of ProPublica

    Cloud servers are an amazingly flexible way to use computing resources. Servers and test benches used to take weeks to order and configure, but thanks to the cloud, you can build up arbitrarily complex farms of computers to do your bidding in a few minutes, from serving a dynamic news app to crunching through a data set to trying out a new technology on the cheap. This course will help you understand the thicket of acronyms and programs that make up Amazon's AWS system and will get you started building servers.

    All you need is a normal Amazon account. Before the class, go to http://aws.amazon.com/ and click "sign up," and follow the instructions so you've got an account ready. Important note: We'll build actual servers and then turn them off, which may cost a few dollars.

    Gold Coin

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Meaningful metrics for journalism (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitiated by Matt Hampel, Carebot Project

    What's success in journalism? From the perspective of the end user, the journalist, the news organization, the industry. Are these very different definitions? Are they hard/easy to assess? * Is every piece of journalism comparable to another piece of journalism? Are there metrics used to determine success/performance for a piece of journalism applicable to all formats of storytelling? * What metrics are you using today and what do they tell you? * What are things you want to know but have no answers to because there are no ways to measures the answer? * What metrics (measures and indicators) are used in your work setting; which ones make sense and why, and how some can be inappropriate/misleading. * What tools/sources do you use to access metrics? How do they fit with your workflow?

    Colorado A

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Data viz for all: Creating interactive experiences that are usable, accessible, and mobile-friendly

    Speakers: Nathaniel Lash of Philadelphia Media Network; Julia Smith of Institute for Nonprofit News; Aaron Williams of The Washington Post; Alex Richards of NerdWallet

    **Moderated by Alex Richards, IRE/NICAR

    We hear a lot of the following during discussions about creating mobile-friendly data-driven experiences: “It’s not possible to make good interactives on mobile.” “It’ll hurt our work on desktop.” “It’s not worth the effort.” “It’s too hard.” One thing is true: Making a news app work well on mobile requires different methodology than is commonly utilized today – but that doesn’t necessarily mean a worse process or an inferior product. In fact, mobile-friendly interactives better serve news audiences, and creating these experiences is possible (and practical!) to do. This session will teach attendees how to better present and share data-driven content on the mobile web. We'll cover the best practices for developing mobile-friendly, accessible data visualizations, which will help news application designers and developers create interactive graphics that work universally and are accessible via assistive technologies like screen readers.

    Colorado F

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Deep dives: Broadcast

    Speakers: Jeremy Jojola of KUSA/9News Denver; Eva Parks of KXAS/NBC5 Dallas-Fort Worth; Jenna Susko of NBC4 Los Angeles; Matt Goldberg of NBCUniversal

    **Moderated by Matt Goldberg, NBC4 Los Angeles

    From government records to stats you compile yourself -- data plays a major part in journalism. But how do you make those digits, figures and records come to life on TV? Veteran journalists walk you through the process that makes their data-driven stories sing.

    Colorado G-J

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Detecting deception: The language of lies

    Speakers: Jeff Hancock of Stanford University; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University

    **Moderated by Cheryl Phillips, Stanford University

    Let's face it: people lie. We lie to each other and to ourselves. How is the rewiring of communication in the digital revolution changing how we lie? How can we trust that online review, or that text message about someone being on their way? We’ll discuss the state-of-the-art in deception detection research on how to spot a liar online, explore some new forms of deception, and examine how different technologies affect both how we lie and how we trust online. Jeff Hancock will share key principles that can guide how we can think about deception and truth in this new digital age and how we can use this knowledge as journalists.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado E

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    Drones, scrapers and fantasy football for campaign finance

    Speakers: Westley Hennigh-Palermo of The Intercept; Amanda Hickman of Factful; Ben Kreimer of The Drone Journalism Lab

    Open Lab for Journalism, Technology, and the Arts is a workshop in BuzzFeed’s San Francisco bureau. Open Lab offers fellowships to artists and programmers and storytellers to spend a year making new work in a collaborative environment. Come meet some of the current fellows and check out projects that you can start using in your newsroom right now.

    Penrose

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Colorado B-D

    9:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Crime

    Speakers: Jodi Upton of Syracuse University; Mark Nichols of USA TODAY Network

    Crime and public safety are beats that are awash in data, but sometimes that makes it hard to see the forest. We’ll take a look at both local and national data, how to calculate crime rates and ways to check if your police department is undercounting/miscounting crime. Come join us to sniff out the story.

    Attendees should be familiar with Excel and while we won’t have time to map, we’ll talk about displaying your results.

    Denver I

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Getting started with SQL

    Speaker: Malik Singleton of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

    Learning to manipulate data is a bit like learning a new language. Actually, it is a language, called structured query language (SQL). This session is an introduction to using SQL to zero in on your data by viewing slices and chunks of it and putting it into a useful order so you can spot the stuff you need to get started toward a story. We'll use SQLite and the Firefox SQLite Manager.

    This session will be most useful if: You have some experience working with data in columns and rows, in spreadsheets or database managers.

    Denver V

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    How to avoid rookie mistakes

    Speakers: Brent Jones of St. Louis Public Radio; Tisha Thompson of ESPN; Matt Wynn of MedPage Today; MaryJo Webster of Star Tribune

    **Moderated by MaryJo Webster, Star Tribune

    A group of seasoned data journalists share their past data analysis mistakes -- whether it occurred while requesting data, cleaning data, analyzing it or even bulletproofing it -- and offer up tips for avoiding these and all kinds of other potential pitfalls.

    Denver III & IV

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to JavaScript

    Speaker: Andy Boyle of Axios

    JavaScript is increasingly integral to front-end and back-end web development. In a lightning introduction to the versatile programming language, we will look at the basic components of JavaScript: variables, arrays, objects, loops, conditionals and functions. While there are no prerequisites, it is helpful if you are familiar with HTML and CSS.

    Matchless

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Stats in Excel

    Speaker: Norm Lewis of University of Florida

    You don't need a special statistics program to run simple statistics. In this session, you'll learn how to compute some basic statistics in Excel and figure out what they mean.

    This session will be most helpful if: You already are comfortable with using functions in Excel.

    Denver VI

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Behind the curtain: What open data looks like from within the government

    Speakers: Rebecca Williams of White House OMB OFCIO; Sisi Wei of ProPublica; Erie Meyer of Office of Management and Budget; Lindsay Young of 18F

    **Moderated by Sisi Wei, ProPublica

    What types of challenges do advocates for open data within the government have to struggle through, and what can we do as journalists to help the process along? Learn about what champions for open data working with or within government agencies have accomplished so far, what they're excited about, and what things (big and small) journalists can do to help improve open data.

    Colorado G-J

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Can't afford your own unicorn? Bringing civic hackers into the newsroom

    Speakers: Derek Eder of DataMade; Josh Stewart of Sunlight Foundation; Marco Tulio Pires of Google News Lab; Eva Constantaras of Internews

    **Moderated by Eva Constantaras, Internews

    Let’s face it, most of us work at media houses that are never going to have a full data team. But we have plenty of evidence from around the world that there is another way! Millions of dollars are being poured into the development of tech hubs, open data portals and data-driven think tanks, all of which are collecting fabulous data, building apps and finding amazing stories, none of which ever reach the public. In this session, the people who have created new models for bringing together civic hackers and under-resourced newsrooms to collaborate on data-driven projects will share what it takes to make these partnerships work and evaluate their impact on the public and the media.

    Denver III-IV

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Special Event

    Conversations: How should news apps teams respond to the era of distributed news? (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitated by Matt Liddy, Australian Broadcasting Corporation

    What's the role of a news apps team in a world of Facebook Instant Articles, Apple News and Snapchat stories? As tech companies build bespoke platforms for publishing the news -- and as audiences shift towards those platforms -- how should news apps teams respond? Is digital journalism that is published solely or primarily on media companies' own platforms now 'legacy' media? More personally, are mid-career digital journalists at risk if they don't adapt quickly to this new environment, and develop another set of skills around off-platform publishing?

    Colorado A

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Counting & summing with SQL

    Speaker: Meghan Hoyer of The Associated Press

    If you know how to write a basic SELECT statement in SQL but are looking to make calculations, then this is the session for you. Learn to count how many times certain records appear in a database, and sum totals across records. These skills can come in handy whether you're covering campaign finance or boating licenses. We'll use SQLite and the Firefox SQLite Manager.

    This session will be most useful if: You took 'Getting started with SQL' or are familiar with 'SELECT' and 'WHERE' statements in SQL.

    Denver V

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Data wrangling with Python

    Speaker: Abraham Epton of Chicago Tribune

    In this session, you’ll get the techniques and libraries you need for managing data-driven stories in Python. We’ll take a dataset and generate some descriptive statistics for it, and then we’ll ask some specific questions of it. We’ll do geographic data analysis, and we’ll learn how to structure a clean and reusable pipeline for analyzing the data that holds up to fact-checking.

    Suggested technical experience: Basic familiarity with Python and with programming, but not a lot. This is a course for people relatively new to Python, but not so new that they’ve never used the language before. If you’re pretty familiar with Excel and can make Python say, “Hello world!” you’re a good fit for this class.

    Denver II

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Excel magic

    Speaker: MaryJo Webster of Star Tribune

    Learn about various tools and functions in Excel that come in handy when you need to re-structure or otherwise get your data ready for analysis. We'll cover string functions, logical functions, date functions, the Tableau Reshaper, merging data using lookup functions and perhaps a few other nifty tricks if time allows. This is a fast-paced class intended to introduce you to these tools, not master them. But you'll walk out with practice data and a 20-page tipsheet that covers in detail everything we do in class, plus other great Excel tips.

    Recommended for: anyone feeling comfortable with basic Excel functions and formulas.

    Denver VI

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Getting data into Excel

    Speaker: Helena Bengtsson of Sveriges Television

    Don't give up if your data isn't presented in a neat Excel file. This session will teach you how to clean and format data to get it into Excel. We will look at how to import text files, how to get a table on a web page into Excel, and what to consider when cutting and pasting data from the internet.

    Denver I

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Python I

    Speakers: Aaron Kessler of CNN; Colleen McEnaney of The Wall Street Journal; Aaron Williams of The Washington Post

    Want to upgrade your data skills? Come learn the Python programming language for a three-hour span. Geared toward beginners, this class with go over language basics and introduce you to key concepts. You'll then take your new Python skills and learn how to read, manipulate and analyze data from a spreadsheet. 

    This session is good for: People who know their way around a computer and are ready to dive into programming. All are welcome, though some familiarity with spreadsheets and the command line will certainly help.

    Gold Coin

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to the DOM and jQuery

    Speaker: Scott Pham of BuzzFeed News

    JavaScript is the key to adding interactivity to your web pages, data visualizations and news apps. Learn how a web page is structured under the hood and how to unlock its full potential with JavaScript and jQuery.

    This session is best for very beginner programmers and is intended to follow Intro to JavaScript.

    Matchless

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Investigating inequality

    Speakers: Holly Hacker of The Dallas Morning News; Kimbriell Kelly of The Washington Post; Burt Hubbard of Rocky Mountain PBS I-News; Malik Singleton of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

    **Moderated by Malik Singleton, New York University

    Data can give journalists a clear way to dig into one of the most important and contentious issues of our time. Panelists will talk about how they investigated resegregation in schools, economic harassment in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama's middle-class economics proposal, and more. They'll discuss the interactive presentations that helped propel these investigations, and will give tips on how to proceed when there may not be an apparent data source available.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado F

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Which chart should I use, and why? Information design for the human brain!

    Speakers: Peter Aldhous of BuzzFeed News; Alexandra Kanik of Louisville Public Media

    We'll explore how research into the ways people estimate numbers will change how you think about choosing charts to tell your stories. (And, no, it doesn't mean everything is a bar chart.) We'll also talk about using color and animation in ways that the human brain understands - intuitively.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado E

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    Why the real-time Web is the new jet fuel for media

    Speakers: Victor Hernandez of independent journalist; Jillian Bloome of Banjo

    Why the real-time Web is the new jet fuel for media Speed of discovery and speed to broadcast are essential in today’s ever-evolving world of media.

    What if you could turn your laptop into a virtual drone -- obtaining immediate “eyes in the sky” capabilities for precise areas of interest. A capacity achieved within seconds and through a few keystrokes and clicks.

    As smartphones become ubiquitous, the ability for communities to report on the world around them grows. By effectively capturing and organizing this data, we can accurately determine what’s happening through the eyes/screens of the people experiencing it firsthand.

    Join Victor Hernandez and Jillian Bloome from Banjo for a fast-moving presentation highlighting emerging challenges and opportunities for tackling social signals, multimedia content, and complex data points to reach audiences faster via the real-time web.

    Penrose

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Advanced OpenRefine: Using regular expressions

    Speaker: Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    This class will cover using some of the advanced regular expressions and cleaning techniques available in OpenRefine.

    The session is best for: people who have used OpenRefine or its predecessor, Google Refine, for simple data cleaning tasks such as faceting, simple clustering, and common transformations.

    Denver VI

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Building maps with Leaflet.js

    Speaker: Chris Essig of The Texas Tribune

    Maps! Who doesn't love wonderful, colorful maps? In this course we will be building a map with Leaflet.js., a very popular Javascript mapping library. The map will display both markers and shapes. The shapes will be used to create a basic choropleth map.

    Participants should have a beginner's knowledge of JavaScript, including basic concepts like objects, arrays and for loops. We will also be working with JSON and GeoJSON data, so some knowledge of these would be also helpful.

    Matchless

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Investing in news, how do you ask for money? (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitated by AmyJo Brown, War Streets Media

    We're good at selling our stories, but crafting grant applications, strategizing pitch decks and talking cash involves different muscles. How do you ask for money to pay for your news projects / startups? What works? What have you learned to avoid? What are the unspoken rules — for example, grants may lay out requirements publicly, but what else is helpful to know about how your application will be evaluated?

    Colorado A

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    Finding insights in connected data: Using graph databases in journalism

    Speaker: William Lyon of Neo4j

    When dealing with datasets, journalists have many options to choose from when moving beyond Excel. Usually the first step is using a relational (or SQL) database. While a relational database can be a good choice for some datasets, data analysts today turn to new tools to gain deeper insight. This talk will show how we can use a graph database to analyze highly connected data using examples from U.S. Congressional data and political email archives. Using the U.S. Congress data, we’ll show you how to explore the dataset using Cypher, the Neo4j query language, to discover legislator activity including bill sponsorship and voting activity. Building up our knowledge of Cypher as we progress, we’ll show how you can use principles from social network analysis to find influential legislators and discover what topics legislators have influence over. Finally, we will examine how to draw insights from the Hillary Clinton email dataset, released as part of a FOIA request earlier this year. We will explore this dataset as a graph of interactions among users, answering questions like: Who is communicating with Hillary the most? What are the topics of these emails? You’ll learn how to visualize these using the Neo4j browser to quickly make sense of the data as we are exploring.

    The goal of this talk is to provide a demonstration of database tools that any journalist can use to explore datasets and draw insights from connected datasets.

    Penrose

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Time value of money

    Speaker: Cezary Podkul of The Wall Street Journal

    You’re read that graf in financial newspapers telling you that “a dollar today is worth more than a dollar tomorrow.” You don’t know what it means, but it sounds kind of important. If this feels familiar, then this session is for you. Discounted cash flow analysis, as it’s called, is the bedrock of the corporate finance world. It also underpins the accounting behind pension plans. In this session, we’ll model out a simple discounted cashflow analysis together and then use it to figure out the unfunded liability of a public pension plan. Come learn a concrete financial analysis skill and how to apply it to a public pension plan near you.

    Denver I

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    How to keep up: Newsapps teams as lifetime learners

    Speakers: Gabriel Dance of The New York Times; Mariana Santos of Fusion; Adam Schweigert of Institute for Nonprofit News; Troy Thibodeaux of The Associated Press

    **Moderated by Troy Thibodeaux, The Associated Press

    It’s the great newsroom double bind: keep up with new technologies or risk becoming obsolete,. but do it while keeping up your day job (which takes all your time). If everyone in the newsroom feels this pressure, the news apps developers and CAR reporters who thrive on being the cool kids on the bleeding edge can feel it even more keenly. In this session, we'll consider some of the methods we use as individuals and as teams to overcome this challenge and build an environment that fosters continuous learning. A few questions we'll consider: How do I continuously hone my chops and keep current with changing technology if that’s not the only thing I do with my time? What strategies have individuals and teams developed that build learning into their workflows and routines? How can editors help create a team culture that supports learning and experimentation without sacrificing productivity? And how can these lessons be applied more broadly to help less technically minded reporters catch up and keep up?

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado E

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Humanizing numbers

    Speakers: Andrew Lehren of NBC News; Elizabeth Shell of CCTV America; Kendall Taggart of BuzzFeed News; Malik Singleton of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

    **Moderated by Malik Singleton, New York University

    Data helps you tell your story, yet for journalists, the most important work remains the human story and giving insight into individuals. Come to this session to see how data journalists help their readers empathize and how they balance analysis with narrative. Panelists will share how they write effectively about statistics, use data to find real people to interview, and develop data visualizations that bring numbers to life. We will show great examples that we admire and we'll share concrete tips from our own work.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Denver III & IV

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    import.io: Web scraping without coding

    Speakers: Megan Luther of InvestigateTV; Nils Mulvad of Kaas & Mulvad

    import.io allows you to convert data from the internet into a structured useable table. This data can then be used to analyze trends, build leads and news stories. Extracting data gives you ultimate control. The class centers around extracting data from the web followed by manipulating and using that data. We will use import.io to gather the data and then use programs such as Google Sheets and Excel to manipulate and use the data.

    The desktop app requires a log-in, which you can set-up or use your Facebook, GitHub, Google or LinkedIn login.

    Denver II

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Python II

    Speakers: Aaron Kessler of CNN; Aaron Williams of The Washington Post; Colleen McEnaney of The Wall Street Journal

    Want to upgrade your data skills? Come learn the Python programming language for a three-hour span. Geared toward beginners, this class with go over language basics and introduce you to key concepts. You'll then take your new Python skills and learn how to read, manipulate and analyze data from a spreadsheet. 

    This session is good for: People who know their way around a computer and are ready to dive into programming. All are welcome, though some familiarity with spreadsheets and the command line will certainly help.

    Gold Coin

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Joining tables with SQL

    Speaker: Andrea Fuller of The Wall Street Journal

    Learn how to join tables, matching information from one file to another. We'll use SQLite and the Firefox SQLite Manager.

    This session will be most useful if: You are familiar with 'counting' , 'summing' or 'GROUP BY' in SQL and want to add another tool to your SQL skill set.

    Denver V

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Open lab

    The open lab is a chance for conference attendees to receive live troubleshooting and guidance from some of our experienced coding teachers outside of hands-on classes. It's a space where they can get help with installation, setting up a basic development environment and other issues on their own computer.

    Colorado B-D

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Structured journalism: Creating the atoms of news

    Speakers: David Caswell of Structured Stories; Jacqui Maher of BBC News; Reg Chua of Reuters

    **Moderated by Reg Chua, Reuters

    Learn how news organizations are deploying structured databases that can be used to create narratives, visualizations and contextual information for traditional stories on the Web. Also, hear the inside story of some of the latest experiments in structured journalism

    Colorado G-J

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    They've got it, you want it: Getting data and docs

    Speakers: Rich Orman of District Attorney, 18th Judicial District (Colorado); Jeff Roberts of Colorado Freedom of Information Coalition; Steve Zansberg of Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz, LLP; Ellen Gabler of The New York Times

    **Moderated by Ellen Gabler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    We've all been there: They've got the data but say you can't have it. What techniques can you use to coax information out of officials? We’ll discuss practical tips on how to negotiate and speed things along – limiting your request, cutting fees, citing statutes. You'll hear from a panel of records experts including a journalist turned director of the Colorado Freedom of Information Coalition, a veteran media attorney and a district attorney who was prosecutor for the Aurora theater shooting trial. They’ll also weigh in on which tactics from reporters actually work: Persistence? Yes. Rudeness? Hmmm.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

     

    Colorado F

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Managing burnout and exploring other professions (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitated by David Eads, NPR

    Struggling with burn out? Sometimes feel you'd be more effective outside the newsroom or in another industry? We'll talk about the pros and cons of newsroom tech work, viable alternatives, and managing burnout.

    Colorado A

    12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Media lawyer brown bag

    Speakers: Rich Orman of District Attorney, 18th Judicial District (Colorado); Steve Zansberg of Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz, LLP; Nabiha Syed of BuzzFeed News

    Does your investigation contain complex legal questions? Unsure of how to proceed? During the media lawyers brown bag, between 12:45 and 2 p.m. on Friday, March 11, bring your lunch and your questions for a personal discussion with some prominent media law experts that will be presenting throughout the 2016 CAR Conference. We'll provide drinks and dessert.

    Penrose

    12:45 pm - 2:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Digging into data for stories: A crash course *pre-registered attendees only

    Kickstart your data skills with IRE's original mini-boot camp. This series of hands-on classes will introduce you to spreadsheets and databases with IRE's proven techniques. IRE's experienced trainers will walk you through sorting, calculating and interviewing data. You'll come away with a solid base for using data analysis in your own newsroom. In addition, we'll provide you with our boot camp materials to help keep you on track long after you leave the conference. Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training. 

    This workshop is good for: Those wanting to get started analyzing data for stories. There are no prerequisites for this workshop and beginners are welcome.

    Attendees must be registered for the conference to attend this workshop.

    Workshop times are Friday afternoon from 2:15 - 4:30 p.m., Saturday afternoon from 2:15 - 5:45 p.m. and Sunday morning from 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Denver V & Denver VI

    2:15 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to R *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Ryann Grochowski Jones of ProPublica; Annie Waldman of ProPublica

    Add statistical heft to your reporting by using R, a free, powerful open-source programming language. By the end of this two-hour session, you will be able to take raw data, import it into R, and start your analysis. Topics will include basic data importing, working with directories, reading in data, installing packages, creating simple visualizations, and how to clean, explore and sort your data. We'll also talk about how to find help when you're stuck.

    This session will be most helpful if: you’re comfortable working with data and you’re ready to take your skills to the next level.

    Attendees must be registered for the conference to attend this workshop.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Mattie Silks

    2:15 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced Django for data analysis

    Speakers: Armand Emamdjomeh of The Washington Post; Anthony Pesce of Los Angeles Times

    You might be familiar with Django's use as a framework for building front-facing webapps, but it can be equally useful as a tool for reporting on and exploring datasets. In this session we'll go beyond the basics of the web framework to walk you through modeling and loading data from a CSV, querying the data, and writing views for analysis and publication.

    This session will be most helpful if: You've made it through the Django tutorial and/or built your first news app. Familiarity with SQL will help.

    Independence

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Data journalists and data teams: Where we are and where we want to go

    Speakers: Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Scott Klein of ProPublica; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Ben Welsh of Los Angeles Times; Reg Chua of Reuters

    **Moderated by Reg Chua, Reuters

    Join a roundtable discussion about how data teams are developing and being organized as the need for new skills and more specialization grows. How do practices differ in small and large newsrooms, and in daily news organizations and investigative centers? How are career tracks for data journalists evolving, and how are potential managers of such teams being groomed and trained?

    Colorado G-J

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Election: Dark money

    Speakers: Carrie Levine of The Center for Public Integrity; Robert Maguire of Center for Responsive Politics; T. Christian Miller of ProPublica; Melissa Yeager of Sunlight Foundation

    **Moderated by T. Christian Miller, ProPublica

    It's becoming harder and harder to track all the money being raised for candidates, from the White House on down the ballot. One of the toughest things to do is track the dark money -- funds given to organizations that are not required to disclose their donors. Such groups now account for hundreds of millions of dollars spent in elections. Our panelists will help you navigate these murky waters and offer tips and techniques for keeping tabs on candidates' coffers.​

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado F

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Hidden data on exploited workers, programs and more: Using U.S. Visa data for investigations

    Speakers: Brant Houston of University of Illinois; Tim Henderson of The Pew Charitable Trusts

    There are more than 50 kinds of visas issued by the U.S. government and only a few get covered, often without any data or data analysis. This session will include an overview of the visa programs and where to get the data about those program. Several worker visa programs get a lot of attention, but dozens of the others get only a quick look. You will leave with data and many story ideas that affect your community, region and state.

    This session is good for: Anyone.

    Denver III-IV

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Python III

    Speakers: Aaron Kessler of CNN; Colleen McEnaney of The Wall Street Journal; Aaron Williams of The Washington Post

    Want to upgrade your data skills? Come learn the Python programming language for a three-hour span. Geared toward beginners, this class with go over language basics and introduce you to key concepts. You'll then take your new Python skills and learn how to read, manipulate and analyze data from a spreadsheet. This session is good for: People who know their way around a computer and are ready to dive into programming. All are welcome, though some familiarity with spreadsheets and the command line will certainly help.

    Gold Coin

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Map like a pro with ArcGIS Online

    Speaker: Brian Peterson of Esri

    We all live in a realm of data. But sometimes, spreadsheets and databases aren’t the best way to tell your story. Take a hands-on tour of the redesigned ArcGIS Online to see how you can easily create intelligent maps in minutes. Learn how the Smart Mapping feature in ArcGIS Online can help you investigate patterns in your data and easily create beautiful data visualizations, even if you’ve never worked with maps or GIS before. If you can use an Internet browser, you can create award-winning maps.

    Prerequisites: None. This class is for anyone who wants to create online maps, whether they’re a seasoned pro or a complete novice. You’ll walk away with the knowledge you need to go back to your newsroom and start making maps immediately.

    Denver I

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    R basics: Data wrangling with R

    Speaker: Caelainn Barr of The Guardian

    Data wrangling is the first leg of any data tour. Learn to use R's free and powerful tools to turn the rawest data into clean tables for analysis and display. By writing R scripts, your data manipulations will be reproducible and leave your raw data intact.

    ​This session will be most helpful if: You are somewhat familiar with R, or have taken Intro to R. ​

    Denver II

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Reporting and presentation with DocumentCloud

    Speakers: Anthony DeBarros of The Wall Street Journal; Ted Han of DocumentCloud; Justin Reese of DocumentCloud

    Get to know the suite of tools that DocumentCloud offers to help you better organize, analyze and present public documents.

    Matchless

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    The ethics and law of reporting on hacked data

    Speakers: Jack Gillum of ProPublica; Quinn Norton of independent journalist; Jeremy Singer-Vine of BuzzFeed News; Nabiha Syed of BuzzFeed News

    **Moderated by Jeremy Singer-Vine, BuzzFeed News

    Sony. Hacking Team. Ashley Madison. With increasing frequency, journalists face the quandary: To report, or not report, on massive data dumps posted online by hackers? What types of stories are fair game? This panel will discuss, and argue, the ethical and legal boundaries of reporting on hacked data.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado E

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Using Trifacta to standardize and clean data: A demo session

    Speaker: Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University

    Come see how to use Trifacta to standardize data and clean up errant values. A look at whether this new software tool is useful for data journalists.

    Colorado A

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Demo

    You don't need a GIS program to make data maps

    Speakers: David Herzog of IRE and NICAR; Daniel Lathrop of University of Iowa

    See how to create compelling maps without using a geographic information system. Learn how you can use R packages to work with shapefiles to create custom maps and discover a new tool under development at the University of Iowa that simplifies the process of creating maps scaled to population or other factors while preserving the shape of individual elements.

    Penrose

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced SQL for analysis

    Speaker: Kendall Taggart of BuzzFeed News

    If you feel comfortable with the Structured Query Language basics that IRE teaches in its boot camps -- SELECT, FROM, WHERE, GROUP BY -- but are ready to see what else SQL can do, this session is for you. We will cover more advanced ways of manipulating and questioning data, such as UPDATE queries, joins, writing sub-queries, and other neat tricks.  We will use SQLite in the class.

    This session will be most useful if: You are comfortable with counting and summing in SQL.

    Denver II

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Election: Reverse-engineering campaign finance stories

    Speakers: Aaron Bycoffe of FiveThirtyEight; Derek Willis of ProPublica; Carrie Levine of The Center for Public Integrity

    We're in the midst of a presidential election cycle when money is expected to play a bigger role than ever. We'll walk you through several stories and ideas involving money in politics and explain each step along the way, from data gathering to analysis to presentation. We'll suggest techniques for coming up with ideas of your own, and cover common scenarios and pitfalls. Bring your own ideas for stories, especially if you don’t know how to get started.

    Colorado F

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Demo

    Four tools in 60 minutes

    Speakers: Bill Hankes of Sqoop; Skylar Olsen of Zillow; Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Domila McFarlane of Panjiva; Jeff Mohr of Kumu

    **Moderated by Jaimi Dowdell, IRE/NICAR

    We'll give representatives of four online services a chance to show off how they can help your reporting. The mostly-free tools include:

    *Panjiva brings transparency to global trade, with insight on the activities of 5 million companies that do business across international borders.

    *Sqoop helps reporters unlock stories from public records site like the SEC, federal courts and Patent Office.

    *Zillow: Download, explore and visualize more than 50 housing metrics -- for free -- at all geographic levels, and use the data to tell stories about poverty, affordability, growth, and more.

    *Kumu: Powerful tools for visualizing relationships and unravelling complex stories.

    Penrose

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to the command line (Unix)

    Speaker: Anna Boiko-Weyrauch of Rocky Mountain PBS I-News

    Are you at the beginning of your journey to becoming data and coding savvy? Or, have you ever heard the term, “Command line” and wondered what it was? The command line is to coding what a pencil is to journalism: a basic yet essential tool. In this session we will walk through what the command line is, how to use it, and why you two should be friends.

    This session is best for those experienced in SQL. Attendees should already be sold on the value of data and coding in journalism and want to learn new skills.

    Matchless

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Lightning-fast data analysis with Tableau

    Speaker: Sarah Ryley of The Trace

    Tableau is a powerful data analysis tool that uses a visual interface to join and query millions of rows of data the easy way — and it's free for IRE members. This session will teach you how to join tables, query data, group and filter dimensions and do some basic calculations with things like numbers, dates and IF/THEN statements all by simply dragging, dropping and clicking your mouse (okay, and a little typing).

    This session is good for: Those who have some familiarity with spreadsheets.

    Independence

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Reproducible research and analysis sharing

    Speakers: Bill Alpert of Barron's; Christopher Groskopf of Quartz; Timo Grossenbacher of Swiss Public Broadcast (SRF); Michelle Minkoff of The Associated Press; Serdar Tumgoren of Stanford University

    **Moderated by Serdar Tumgoren, The Associated Press

    Data analysis has been at the heart of the NICAR community for years, and many journalists are now upping their game by adopting best practices from the scientific community. This panel will convene sundry news nerds to discuss their approaches and tools of choice for producing "push-button", reproducible analyses, as well as how they share such analyses with colleagues in the newsroom and the public.

    Colorado E

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Risks and rewards of rolling your own criminal justice data

    Speakers: Gabriel Dance of The New York Times; Kenan Davis of The Guardian; Steven Rich of The Washington Post; Jodi Upton of Syracuse University; Tom Meagher of The Marshall Project

    **Moderated by Tom Meagher, The Marshall Project

    Over the past year and a half, criminal justice has risen to the top of the national conversation in a way it hasn’t for decades. Yet even as public and open data in many areas have improved, we’ve found that in criminal justice the data is as bad as it’s ever been. In this session, journalists from four news organizations — The Washington Post, The Guardian, USA TODAY and The Marshall Project — will talk about how (and why) they built their own databases to fill the gaps and what they learned in the process.

    Denver III & IV

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    So you want to be a lonely coder

    Speakers: Lindsey Cook of U.S. News & World Report; Brent Jones of St. Louis Public Radio; Alexandra Kanik of Louisville Public Media; Scott Pham of BuzzFeed News

    **Moderated by Scott Pham, Reveal/CIR

    How do you transition from a journalist who does data stuff sometimes to a full-fledged coder in your newsroom and what happens when you do? This session will help you take your data skills to the next level by giving you easy-to-replicate projects and newsroom tools that involve minimal coding and can be done in most locations and beats. Panelists will take you through some “easy wins” for your newsroom and discuss their experiences navigating newsrooms as the only coder in the room, as well as how to get buy-in from your boss and to convince higher-ups of the extra value in these types of projects.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado G-J

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Twitter tricks & analytics

    Speaker: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR

    If you know the basics of Twitter, you're ready to ratchet up your skills. This hands-on session will take you to the next level: advanced Twitter searches, mining tweets by location, creative uses of Twitter lists (public and private), and apps/services that provide robust analytics. The payoff: better sources (particularly during breaking news) and a competitive edge in your market.

    Prerequisite: Please have an active Twitter account set up before the class

    Denver I

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Visualization and analysis in Python (repeat session)

    Speaker: Roberto Rocha of CBC

    So you know a bit of Python, you’ve scraped a site or two, and got some data with it. Now get quick insights out of that data by visualizing it right inside of Python. This course will teach you how to make quick exploratory charts using Matplotlib, a powerful and versatile graphing library, using the handy iPython Notebook (Jupyter) environment. You’ll also learn how to export these charts to hand over to a designer or straight to publication.

    Suggested experience: You should have some basic knowledge of programming, preferably in Python.

    Gold Coin

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Lightning Talks (Sponsored by the Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Sisi Wei of ProPublica

    **Moderated by Sisi Wei, ProPublica

    Sometimes you don't need 45 minutes to explain a useful technique or interesting resource. Join your colleagues for a session of short (5-minute) talks about doing CAR, Web development or other related topics. Go here for a list of the 2016 lightning talks you selected.

    Colorado E-J

    4:45 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Philip Meyer Award Presentation

    The presentation of the 2015 Philip Meyer Journalism Awards will take place on Friday at the 2016 CAR Conference in Denver. The awards recognize the best uses of social research methods in journalism and are named in honor of Philip Meyer, author of “Precision Journalism” and retired Knight Chair in Journalism and UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communications. 

    Three awards are given annually — a first, second and third place — to recognize the best work using techniques that are part of precision journalism, computer-assisted reporting and social science research. The awards are: $500 for first, $300 for second, and $200 for third.

    For information on the 2015 Award winners, click here.

    Colorado E-J

    6:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Reception

    Philip Meyer Award Reception

    Join fellow CAR attendees in celebrating the Philip Meyer Award Winners at a reception Friday night with light hor d'oeuvres and a cash bar beginning at 6:15 p.m. in Denver III-IV.

    Denver III-IV

    6:15 pm - 7:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference registration (Saturday)

    Registration will be located on lower level 2 of the Denver Marriott City Center.

    Lower level 2

    8:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference sales (Saturday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. The winner of the IRE T-shirt contest will be displayed and on sale.

    Colorado B-D

    8:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Build your first news app (Saturday) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Ben Welsh of Los Angeles Times; Derek Willis of ProPublica

    This is a continuation of Friday's hands-on workshop. Pre-registered attendees only.

    Independence

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Agate for data analysis in Python (repeat session)

    Speaker: Christopher Groskopf of Quartz

    In this hands-on session we'll introduce you to programmatic data analysis with the agate module for Python. We'll go through the basics—reading CSV files, transforming data, and running basic statistical analysis—while leaving plenty of room for your questions. This session is ideal for folks with some Python experience, especially those who've reached the limits of what they can do with tools like csvkit, but find pandas and numpy bewildering.

    Mattie Silks

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Beyond chi-square: Is it a fluke?

    Speakers: Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Olga Pierce of ProPublica; John Templon of BuzzFeed News; Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Mark Hansen of Columbia Journalism School

    **Moderated by Sarah Cohen, The New York Times

    Sometimes it's important to know whether a pattern could be a fluke. Is a stockbroker lucky or trading on insider knowledge? Did a player throw a game or have a bad streak? Is the lottery rigged or could the same person win twice?

    Reporters often turn to traditional methods like a chi-square test to determine statistical significance, but other techniques, from poisson distributions to monte carlo simulations, might be a better fit. This panel will walk you through some of the methods you can use to answer the question: is it a fluke?

    Colorado G-J

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Beyond crowdsourcing: How to get citizens involved in investigative journalism

    Speakers: Daniel Drepper of CORRECTIV; Andrew Haeg of GroundSource; Subramaniam Vincent of Stanford University; Denise Malan of IRE and NICAR

    **Moderated by Denise Malan, INN/IRE

    In this session we'll discuss the latest developments in crowdsourcing and how everyone can contribute to journalism. Learn how correctiv.org and Citizen Matters encourage citizen participation and see GroundSource, a mobile engagement platform that enables two-way communications and relationship-building. We'll also discuss challenges in getting citizens to interact and building platforms that foster civic engagement.

    Colorado E

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Building tools and automation for Node.js

    Speaker: Ryan Murphy of The Texas Tribune

    We've all been there – moving files one by one, minifying our scripts, running our CSS compilers – all by hand. But there's a better way! The proliferation of static site generators have led to an explosion of tools that make it easy to automate the tedious parts of static site building and achieve consistent results. In this workshop I'll show you how to automate tasks with Node.js, walk through how the parts interact and set you on the path of being able to automate tasks on your own.

    Comfort with working on the command line required! Experience with or awareness of Node.js recommended.

    Denver II

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    CAR wash: Techniques for cleaning dirty data

    Speaker: Nate Carlisle of The Salt Lake Tribune

    Dirty data lurk everywhere: in text files, spreadsheets, databases, and PDFs. We'll walk you through some examples of the most common types of dirty data, point out telltale signs of data illness and explain how you can whip data into shape using some simple tools and methods.

    This session will be most useful if: You have some experience working with data in columns and rows, in spreadsheets or database managers.

    Gold Coin

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Let's talk leadership (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitated by Kaeti Hinck, The Washington Post

    There are lots of different ways to be a leader in your organization, no matter what your title is. So what does it take to be a good one? A few questions: What leadership skills and characteristics have been undervalued? How do we get better representation in leadership roles? What's the right amount of process for a dev/data team? What keeps a team happy and healthy? What *doesn't* work? What can current managers do to support the next generation of newsroom leaders? Who's the best boss you've ever had and what made them great? This conversation could be geared toward people who are curious about leadership, or current managers who want to swap best practices and words of warning. Ideally a mix of both.

    Colorado A

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Colorado B-D

    9:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Panel

    Getting your feet wet: Data projects you can try anywhere

    Speakers: Kevin Crowe of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Jamie Grey of InvestigateTV

    Two reporters who have worked in cities across the U.S. (Dubuque, Boise, Milwaukee and San Diego, to name a few) will walk you through short-term, data-driven investigations you can take home to your coverage area. They’ll cover how to find stories in TSA incident reports, school cafeteria inspections, lawsuits against cities, public health records, infrastructure problems and kennel complaints. Drop in, and you’re sure to get a solid story idea to take back to your editors.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado F

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to R

    Speakers: Coulter Jones of The Wall Street Journal; Amelia McNamara of ----0000 Institution Not Present 0000----

    Add statistical heft to your reporting by using R, a free, powerful open-source programming language. By the end of this two-hour session, you will be able to take raw data, import it into R, and start your analysis. Topics will include basic data importing, working with directories, reading in data, installing packages, creating simple visualizations, and how to clean, explore and sort your data. We'll also talk about how to find help when you're stuck.

    This session will be most helpful if: you’re comfortable working with data and you’re ready to take your skills to the next level.

    Matchless

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Regular expressions

    Speaker: Christian McDonald of University of Texas

    Regular expressions are a powerful and compact way to slice, dice and clean up dirty data. They may look intimidating, but they're a must-know skill for anyone who works with data. We'll learn the fundamentals of regex and look at some real-world examples you can use when you get home.

    This session is good for: Those with some experience working with data in spreadsheets and/or database managers.

    Denver I

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    SQLite I

    Speaker: Troy Thibodeaux of The Associated Press

    SQL (Structured Query Language) is one of the most useful tools in the data journalism tool belt. It’s a pretty simple language that does something pretty powerful: it lets you communicate with your database and spell out exactly the questions you want to ask about your data. Using the lightweight SQLite database manager, we’ll focus on queries that can be used in many different database programs. Join us for a gentle introduction to SQL that will convince you this stuff isn’t so hard. This is the first of three SQL sessions using SQLite.

    Suggested Technical Experience: Familiarity with spreadsheets will be useful, but no previous database experience or other technical knowledge required.

     

    Denver V

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Stats: An introduction (repeat session)

    Speaker: Jeff Kelly Lowenstein of Grand Valley State University

    Statisticians need to really understand their data (and so do you!) before they begin running analyses. As a result, statistical software packages such as PSPP and SPSS have many powerful tools to summarize your data. You're going to love them. We'll take a look at the structure of data in PSPP, do data transformations and run some basic statistical tests.

    This session will be most helpful if: You have familiarity with Excel and some database software. We've got a *lot* of ground to cover in this hour.

    Denver VI

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    The Bot Emporium: A selection of parts, platforms, applications and ideas for your newsroom

    Speaker: Justin Myers of The Associated Press

    Do you or others in your newsroom do some of the same tasks over and over? Are there stories you'd like to get, but they seem like they'd need too much manual copy-and-paste work? Are you a reporter or editor who just wants to know about updates to data sets online? In this session, you'll learn about a variety of services, libraries, tutorials and other tools to help you build your own bot army.

    Penrose

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Training your newsroom to look for data and interactive ideas

    Speakers: Rachel Schallom of independent journalist; Dana Williams of Pacific Daily News, Guam

    Traditional journalists often want to work on data and interactive pieces, but they don’t know where to start. We’ll share tips on how to train your newsroom to uncover ideas on their beat and keep the ideas flowing with thoughtful feedback and communication.

    This session is good for: Anyone.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Denver III-IV

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Getting organized - Letting information work for you, rather than being buried by it (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitated by Brent Jones, St. Louis Public Radio

    We’ll discuss how best to organize all the information we need to do our jobs: Bookmarking, file organization, email, paper; how do you make information work for you rather than being buried by it? We’ll try to stay focused on ideas and processes, rather than specific tools so we can maximize the utility for folks, no matter what tools they have access to at their workplaces.

    Colorado A

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Creating a Twitter bot with Node.js

    Speaker: Thomas Wilburn of The Seattle Times

    In this class, we'll introduce students to Node.js, a powerful JavaScript environment for building networked servers, and use it to build a Twitter bot that monitors the firehose for a given search and responds to other users. Along the way, we'll talk about managing async code flows, using the NPM package system, and how to break a Node application into small, reusable modules.

    This class is best for students with intermediate JavaScript experience, but no previous Node experience is required.

    Denver II

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Special Event

    Custom analysis by IRE/NICAR

    Speakers: Megan Luther of InvestigateTV; Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    Short on staff or time? Let IRE/NICAR do your data analysis for you. We clean, analyze and map. Come learn what our team has to offer.

    Colorado B-D

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Data wrangling with Python (repeat session)

    Speaker: Jackie Kazil of Capital One

    In this session, you’ll get the techniques and libraries you need for managing data-driven stories in Python. We’ll take a dataset and generate some descriptive statistics for it, and then we’ll ask some specific questions of it. We’ll do geographic data analysis, and we’ll learn how to structure a clean and reusable pipeline for analyzing the data that holds up to fact-checking.

    Suggested technical experience: Basic familiarity with Python and with programming, but not a lot. This is a course for people relatively new to Python, but not so new that they’ve never used the language before. If you’re pretty familiar with Excel and can make Python say, “Hello world!” you’re a good fit for this class.

    Mattie Silks

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Digital dark arts

    Speakers: Nicole Hensley of New York Daily News; Mike Tigas of ProPublica

    Privacy and digital security issues surround our work as journalists. Learn about threat modeling (the "who, what, where, when, why, and how" of security), the metadata you leave behind, and easy tools to help improve your "security hygiene". We’ll also discuss how these digital insecurities can benefit your own reporting by using common social media “gotchas,” scooping the competition and metadata blunders to chase leads.

    You may also be interested in the “CryptoParty” session Saturday afternoon, where you can get hands-on help installing various security and encryption tools. 

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado F

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Election: Digging in on local and state elections

    Speakers: Edwin Bender of National Institute on Money in State Politics; Nic Garcia of Chalkbeat; sandra fish of independent journalist; Charles Lewis of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    **Moderated by Charles Lewis, Investigative Reporting Workshop

    Tips and tricks on following the money and messages in state and local elections, from the school board to the statehouse. How to track the players beyond candidates to special interests, super PACs and nonprofits.

    Denver III & IV

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    How to make Google Earth flythroughs

    Speakers: Nassos Stylianou of BBC News; Tom Nurse of BBC News

    Find out how to make simple flyovers with Google Earth – a great way to make bespoke video content that you can weave into your visual journalism storytelling. This session should be fine for anyone, though some experience using Google Earth may come in handy.

    Gold Coin

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to R (continued)

    Speakers: Coulter Jones of The Wall Street Journal; Amelia McNamara of ----0000 Institution Not Present 0000----

    Add statistical heft to your reporting by using R, a free, powerful open-source programming language. By the end of this two-hour session, you will be able to take raw data, import it into R, and start your analysis. Topics will include basic data importing, working with directories, reading in data, installing packages, creating simple visualizations, and how to clean, explore and sort your data. We'll also talk about how to find help when you're stuck.

    This session will be most helpful if: you’re comfortable working with data and you’re ready to take your skills to the next level.

    Matchless

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    QGIS I: Importing and displaying geographic data

    Speaker: Alexandra Kanik of Louisville Public Media

    Not all datasets need to be mapped, but some do! This mapping class is perfect for beginners looking to learn the basics of visualizing geographic data. We'll go over how to find publicly available data, convert addresses to map points, join datasets and use the open source mapping software, QGIS.

    Denver I

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Right is the new cool

    Speakers: Agustin Armendariz of The New York Times; Sinduja Rangarajan of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Janet Roberts of Reuters

    Getting it right is important, but don't let data warts turn you into the Captain No of your news organization. This session will explore ways to overcome the limitations of data and to flip your switch from accuracy zealot to reporter of cool findings.

    Colorado G-J

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    SQLite II

    Speaker: Emmanuel Martinez of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

    The second session in SQLite will get you more comfortable querying a database by learning how to perform math in SQL. Learn how to group columns, perform counts and sums to arrive at keys findings.

    Suggested technical experience: Anyone who attended SQLite I or anyone who has some experience with SQL.

    Denver V

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Stats: Linear regression (repeat session)

    Speaker: Holly Hacker of The Dallas Morning News

    ​Go beyond counting and sorting. Learn how (and when) to measure relationships, level playing fields and make predictions.

    This session will be most useful if: You took 'Stats: An introduction' and want to know how to apply what you learned, or are comfortable with summary statistics and PSPP or SPSS and new to stats. Familiarity with spreadsheets and database managers is recommended.

    Denver VI

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    The best admin tools for the job

    Speakers: Gregor Aisch of The New York Times; Lindsey Cook of U.S. News & World Report; Jon Schleuss of Los Angeles Times; Chris Canipe of Axios

    **Moderated by Chris Canipe, The Wall Street Journal

    Sometimes building a custom admin can be as much work as building the interactive project itself. What are your go-to tools for feeding data, text and images to interactive projects? Do you build Django admins? Google Spreadsheets? Do you let reporters and editors edit raw JSON? This discussion will cover approaches for long-lived content machines and everyday tools that make small projects flexible and repeatable.

    Colorado E

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    The data of images: Tools to help analyze, verify, and debunk visuals

    Speaker: Samaruddin Kassim Stewart of Society of Professional Journalists

    Today, when breaking news happens there will likely be an eyewitness photograph of it. However, many newsrooms don’t have established workflow on how best to source, verify, and debunk crowd-sourced imagery. Hear practical tips and techniques on how the data in images can be used to provide location, camera specifics, time and date, prior publishing instances, and if the image has been modified in editing applications such as Adobe Photoshop.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Penrose

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Addicted: Revealing hidden communities using substance abuse data

    Speakers: Jacquee Petchel of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Stephen Stirling of NJ Advance Media

    Don’t settle for ‘it can’t be done.’ Communities that don’t want to be found don’t have to remain a mystery. See how we used crowdsourcing and data analysis to pull back the curtain on the nation’s growing heroin epidemic, quantifying it and humanizing it at the same time. This session will focus on addiction data, but panelists' tips and techniques can easily be applied to other hard-to-reach topics.

    Colorado G-J

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Real talk for women in nerd journalism - Women only (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitated by Rachel Schallom, Fusion

    Real talk for women in journalism/especially nerd journalism. Some potential questions: How do you handle small sexist comments? What are coping strategies for when you are the only female on the team? How do you keep your voice heard?

    Colorado A

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Fusion Tables: Advanced

    Speaker: Daniel Lathrop of University of Iowa

    Fusion Tables is not just a way to publish maps! This session you will learn to use this tool to do data analysis and exploratory data analysis cheap and easy.

    Gold Coin

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    International CAR

    Speakers: Eva Constantaras of Internews; Qiong Wang of Wuhan University; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV; Helena Bengtsson of Sveriges Television

    **Moderated by Megan Luther, IRE/NICAR

    The use of data in journalism is exploding worldwide. This session will examine that growth in several countries, the data used for projects and how those stories illuminate universal challenges. We'll also explore the ways data plays a vital role in cross-border projects.

    Colorado E

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Jobs and career straight-talk: For (and by) young'uns only

    Speakers: Jeremy Merrill of Quartz; Sisi Wei of ProPublica

    Have questions on how to break into the field or get a paid internship/job? Simple or impolitic ones that you couldn't ask a boss or hiring manager/editor? Questions about newsroom "culture" or the tacit knowledge required to network or interview for a job? Sisi Wei (2011 grad) and Jeremy Merrill (2012 grad), will be giving students and early-career journalists any knowledge and job-seeking advice they need to help them become designer/developer/data journalists. We'll also pair you up with other young, employed grads for a few rounds of speed Q&A so you can get different perspectives and a chance to ask questions in in a small group or one-on-one.

    To make this a safe space to ask silly questions, we're asking mid-career journalists and people with hiring power not to attend. Non-young'uns and young'uns-at-heart who are trying to enter the field laterally are welcome to join, but the session will be geared towards the experience of recent graduates (including generally-applicable job search and resume tips), so it may not be as helpful to you.

    Desserts and beverages will be provided during the second half of the session.

    Penrose

    11:30 am - 1:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Mapping with CartoDB

    Speaker: CJ Sinner of Star Tribune

    If you've mastered FusionTables but want more control over your maps, try CartoDB. This browser-based tool allows for a variety of point and polygon map styles, layering options and legend customization. We'll walk through the basics of what CartoDB can do and leave you with a few ideas to bring back home. A working knowledge of location data types (KML vs. GeoJSON vs. Lat/Long vs. Addresses) is appreciated but not mandatory! ​You can c​reate a​ free​ CartoDB account before this session begins​ (cartodb.com/signup)​.

    Matchless

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Python pandas for data analysis

    Speakers: Carla Astudillo of NJ Advance Media; Joe Germuska of Northwestern University Knight Lab

    A hands-on training on how to use python to analyze complicated data. We will teach pandas, a data analysis library which lets you explore big and complex data in a way that can be documented, replicated and automated-- with the help of the sleek and powerful IPython notebook. This is session is best for those with experience in Python

    Mattie Silks

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    QGIS II: Manipulating, editing and analyzing geographic data

    Speaker: Michael Corey of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

    We'll learn how to go about joining data from a CSV to a shapefile, map projections, intersect queries, hex-binning and more. This session will be best for those with at least a basic knowledge of mapping concepts but no experience is required beyond what's covered in the basic QGIS class.

    Denver I

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    R basics: Data wrangling with R (repeat session)

    Speaker: Bill Alpert of Barron's

    Data wrangling is the first leg of any data tour. Learn to use R's free and powerful tools to turn the rawest data into clean tables for analysis and display. By writing R scripts, your data manipulations will be reproducible and leave your raw data intact.

    ​This session will be most helpful if: You are somewhat familiar with R, or have taken Intro to R. ​

    Denver II

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    SQLite III

    Speaker: Troy Thibodeaux of The Associated Press

    Building on what you’ve learned in the first two sessions, we will introduce joins: a powerful feature of SQL that lets you combine the contents of multiple tables based on shared data. Combining information across multiple spreadsheets is tricky in Excel, so this is where SQL really starts to shine.
    SQL was born to do data mashups, and this class will help you put them to work.

    Suggested technical Experience: Anyone who attended SQLite II or who has familiarity with SELECT, aggregate functions and GROUP BY in SQL. 

    Denver V

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Stats: Logistic regression (repeat session)

    Speaker: John Perry of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Linear regression helps you find relationships between two or more variables, but when an outcome has only two possibilities, you need a different tool. That, my friends, is where logistic regression comes in.

    This session will be most useful if: You took 'Stats: An introduction', or are comfortable with summary statistics and PSPP or SPSS. Familiarity with spreadsheets and database managers is recommended.

    Denver VI

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    The evolution of data journalism education

    Speakers: Mark Hansen of Columbia Journalism School; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University; Matt Waite of University of Nebraska - Lincoln

    Phil Meyer has argued for decades that others should be able to reproduce reporters' data journalism. Now, with news organizations sharing data and analysis code, and tools like GitHub and Jupyter Notebook making that more accessible, should the way we teach data journalism change with the times?

    Denver III-IV

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    The life cycle of a news app

    Speakers: Scott Klein of ProPublica; Jacqui Maher of BBC News; Jolie McCullough of The Texas Tribune; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    **Moderated by Jennifer LaFleur, Reveal/CIR

    A news app needs planning, care and feeding. If you design an app that needs to be updated, you can’t always count on government agencies maintaining the same format. This panel will give you some tips for designing apps in a way that will keep them alive: How to care for them and how to make those difficult end-of-life decisions.

    Colorado F

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Inclusion solutions (Sponsored by SRCCON)

    **Facilitated by Sandra Fish, New Mexico In Depth; Yolanda Martinez, Pew Research Center

    Including and respecting those of different genders, ethnicities, faiths, etc. makes for a better workplace and a better work product. Inclusivity better reflects our audience and may help us increase our reach to that audience. So how can we work together to get it done? Are there concrete steps those of us in the data journalism community can take?

    Colorado A

    12:45 pm - 1:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Digging into data for stories: A crash course (Saturday) *pre-registered attendees only

    This is a continuation of Friday's hands-on workshop. Pre-registered attendees only.

    Denver V & Denver VI

    2:15 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Special Event

    California Code Rush

    Speakers: James Gordon of Reynolds Journalism Institute; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University; Ben Welsh of Los Angeles Times; Aaron Williams of The Washington Post

    Hacks, hackers and newbies of all ages! Step right up and help the California Civic Data Coalition master CAL-ACCESS, the golden state’s campaign cash database. Our team is here at NICAR 2016 with dozens of open tickets, in all shapes and sizes. And we are asking you to help close them out.

    It’s a simple game. Submit a patch, win a prize. The bigger the challenge, the bigger the prize. Don’t worry if you’re new to open source. Stop by and we’ll guide you through your first contribution, from fork to patch to pull.

    Colorado A

    2:15 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Special Event

    Crypto Party

    Speaker: Mike Tigas of ProPublica

    Several conference sessions cover tools and applications to improve security for you and your sources. Now that you've heard about them, you're probably itching to try them out. We'll be available to help anybody with a laptop or a smartphone to install more secure software and learn how to use it right. We will rely on volunteers to help out, so what you're able to install and how long it takes will depend on demand. Remember also that you must have administrative privileges on your machine; if you're blocked from these privileges, we won't be able to override that.

    Colorado B-D

    2:15 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Demo

    Delivering the news over HTTPS

    Speaker: Paul Schreiber of FiveThirtyEight

    Lots of websites -- from Wikipedia to Reddit to the Washington Post -- are moving towards encrypting all of their web traffic to protect their readers' privacy. We'll talk about what this all means (benefits, downsides) and problems we've encountered moving to HTTPS (and how we solved them).

    Penrose

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    GitHub 101

    Speaker: Anna Wiener of GitHub

    GitHub is the best place to share code with friends, co-workers, classmates, and complete strangers. At its core, GitHub is a source-code host, but the platform can be used for sharing and collaborating on anything from government data to prose. Learn the basics about how to collaborate around code, prose and more with GitHub. All participants will collaborate on real projects using GitHub.com and GitHub Desktop clients. We'll cover GitHub features like Forks, Pull Requests and Issues, and learn how to use Markdown to create text files. GitHub is based on Git, a version control system, so we'll also cover key Git topics, such as repositories, commits and branches. This is for new GitHub users: no coding experience is required for this workshop. Already know the basics? Check out the GitHub 201 workshop for leveling up with the command line.

    Independence

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Parsing prickly PDFs

    Speakers: Jacob Fenton of independent journalist; Jeremy Singer-Vine of BuzzFeed News

    Sometimes, life gives you ugly PDFs. In this session, we'll introduce you to a range of tools for pulling structured data out of the journalists' most-hated file format. We'll cover point-and-click software, command-line utilities, and libraries for writing custom PDF parsers. (For most tools, no programming experience is required.)

    Denver III & IV

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Practical data viz in JavaScript

    Speaker: Dana Amihere of KPCC - 89.3

    Need to create a quick interactive data viz and not ready to venture into D3? This is the class for you.

    Must be comfortable with HTML/CSS. Prior JS experience is encouraged, but not required.

    Denver I

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    R basics: Data viz

    Speaker: Ronald Campbell of NBC Owned Television Stations

    Learn how to see trends in your data and explain it to your audience with histograms, box plots, line charts and more using some of the sophisticated visualization tools available in R.

    Denver II

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Ruby web frameworks: Rails

    Speaker: Al Shaw of ProPublica

    This class will introduce the Ruby on Rails web framework. We'll learn how to start a Rails project, how Rails organizes code and introduce the Model-View-Controller concept of web development. We'll also learn how to use databases with Rails, automating tasks with Rake and how to set up the room to create your first news app with some sample data. While anyone is welcome, this session is best for those that have some knowledge of basic web technologies like HTML, and some previous Ruby experience or have attended the earlier Ruby classes at NICAR.

    Matchless

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Spotlight on the story

    Speakers: Matt Carroll of Northeastern University; Griff Palmer of independent journalist; Mark Horvit of University of Missouri; Jacquee Petchel of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    ** Moderated by Mark Horvit, IRE/NICAR

    Data can play a vital role in a story, even when it didn't start out as a data-focused project at all. That was true for the journalists on the Boston Globe's Spotlight team who were digging into the Catholic Church, just as it was for IRE Award winning investigations into deaths on the U.S.-Mexico border and intense lobbying of state attorneys general in New York. Journalists who worked on all three of these projects talk about how data made the difference in their work.

    Colorado E

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Testing and debugging code in Python

    Speaker: Geoff Hing of APM Reports

    This hands-on session will walk participants through tools for testing and debugging Python code for common newsroom tasks. Participants will also learn software design patterns that make their code easier to test and debug. Participants will learn by doing as they write tests for newsroom code and fix broken code with the help of the debugger. Tools covered will be [pdb](https://docs.python.org/2/library/pdb.html) and [unittest](https://docs.python.org/2/library/unittest.html).

    Suggested technical experience: Participants should be comfortable with basic command line usage and should have some experience with git. They should have written a Python program that uses packages and is broken up into multiple functions, classes and modules.

    Gold Coin

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    The exploding ecosystem of health data

    Speakers: Coulter Jones of The Wall Street Journal; Charles Ornstein of ProPublica; Fabiola Torres of Ojo Público

    The past two years have seen a proliferation of public data sets that let you search for doctors and see the pharmaceutical company payments they’ve received, the drugs they’ve prescribed and the money they’ve collected from Medicare. This is true not only in the United States, but increasingly, around the world. You’ll leave here with a better understanding of what datasets are publicly available, how to create your own health data set and cautions to keep in mind.

    Colorado G-J

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Turning data into damn good audio and video journalism

    Speakers: Michael Corey of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Kavya Sukumar of Vox Media; Nancy Watzman of Internet Archive; Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma

    **Moderated by Joe Wertz, StateImpact Oklahoma

    Go beyond mapping, graphing and searching, and use your computer to create compelling multimedia journalism — with data. From tracking influence in political ads by mining metadata to "sonifying" an earthquake boom, this panel will teach you techniques and tools to help you transform numbers into immersive, explanatory news.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado F

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Under pressure: Real life in real time with breaking news

    Speaker: Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area

    It’s become one of the hottest sessions at every CAR conference. How would you and your newsroom fair in digging out little known facts and information under the pressure of a breaking news deadline? One of the best ways to get better is to practice. In this exercise, we want you to imagine that you’re a journalist in Denver when breaking news hits your scanner. Get a game plan and figure out where you want to search. Try to find as much information that can help you move the story forward with a watchdog eye. Set the clock as a timer for 5- to 10-minute intervals to see how quickly you can find information. Once you’re done, compare yourself to others in the room. This is a real life scenario where you can learn to break news by never leaving your computer. The skills learned in this seminar can also be used for turning daily general assignment stories when there’s NOT breaking news. This session regularly fills up and the tipsheet that comes with it is in high demand. If you’re interested get there early to get a seat.

    Mattie Silks

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    All about the analysis

    Speakers: Ricardo Brom of La Nacion; Tyler Dukes of WRAL-Raleigh; Chrys Wu of Matchstrike LLC; Tania Montalvo of Animal Politico

    **Moderated by Chrys Wu, The New York Times

    We talk about interrogating the data, but exactly what does that mean? What questions should be we asking? How do we formulate those questions? What about running various analysis techniques that might surface "interesting" outliers in data? Or is the answer always "Apply the random forest classification technique"? Our panel of experienced data journalists will explore the intricacies of data analysis.

    Colorado E

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Demo

    Command line graphics: How to use your terminal to process tons of images, extract data from photos, make GIFs and movies...and more

    Speaker: Jon Keegan of Tow Center - Columbia University

    Some of the most powerful tools for creating visuals and working with images lie hidden in your terminal. We'll do an overview of some of these amazing (FREE!) tools – such as ImageMagick and ffmpeg – and see some real world techniques for working with large collections of images, and how I use these tools in my projects at WSJ. Some of the things we'll cover: make a timelapse video from sequential images, extract and save metadata embedded in photos, create image quilts, and build animated GIFs from videos.

    Penrose

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Command line tools for reporters (Unix)

    Speakers: Agustin Armendariz of The New York Times; Kendall Taggart of BuzzFeed News

    Ever had a CSV file too large to open in Excel? Ever had one so big it crashed your computer? We’ll show you some simple tricks for wrangling data on the command line. If you've never programmed before but frequently use Excel and SQL, this class will make your life better. Bonus: We’ll show you how to make your Mac recite poetry for you.

    Prerequisites: Not scared of a monochrome screen; perhaps Windows/Unix command line basics Want a preview before committing to spending an hour with us? This repo is a work in progress: https://github.com/armendariz/terminal_recipes

    Independence

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Creating a Twitter bot with Node.js (repeat session)

    Speaker: Thomas Wilburn of The Seattle Times

    In this class, we'll introduce students to Node.js, a powerful JavaScript environment for building networked servers, and use it to build a Twitter bot that monitors the firehose for a given search and responds to other users. Along the way, we'll talk about managing async code flows, using the NPM package system, and how to break a Node application into small, reusable modules.

    This class is best for students with intermediate JavaScript experience, but no previous Node experience is required.

    Denver I

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Digging deeper with social media

    Speakers: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR; Misty Montano of KUSA/9News Denver

    Explore new apps and advanced searches to find experts and other sources for enterprise and breaking news stories. Discover how best to find people quickly on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram. Learn the best tricks for finding sources in a specific location (city, region, state or country).

    Denver III-IV

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Campaign finance

    Speaker: Derek Willis of ProPublica

    Finding the story: Campaign finance Learn how to decipher federal campaign finance filings, what to look for and how to find stories in the data.

    This session is good for people who are comfortable with Excel, but no specific campaign finance knowledge is required.

    Mattie Silks

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Free tools

    Speakers: Helena Bengtsson of Sveriges Television; Samantha Sunne of independent journalist

    News outlets are perennially strapped for cash, and cutting-edge data work isn't often the squeaky wheel that gets the grease. We'll go over free tools that can help you fit data into your daily schedule, build some cool visualizations and accomplish more for less. We'll move fast and cover tools across the spectrum from beginner to advanced.

    Colorado G-J

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Python frameworks

    Speaker: Ryan Nagle of Institute for Nonprofit News

    This session is for those looking to expand their Python skill set to include a basic understanding of what Python frameworks are, see some examples of how one might use a framework (e.g., a simple web application using Flask) and learn a bit out where to find Python frameworks to help speed up the development process for your own projects. This session is geared towards those comfortable with the fundamentals of Python including at least cursory knowledge of functions, classes and modules.

    Gold Coin

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    R basics: Stats

    Speaker: Olga Pierce of ProPublica

    Learn how to analyze data through methods grounded in statistical theory. Those familiar with R will be introduced to regression models, significance tests, risk ratios, various distributions and more.

    Denver II

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Scraping the web with Ruby

    Speaker: Jeff Ernsthausen of ProPublica

    This course will cover the basics of scraping websites in Ruby, with a focus on strategies for getting the data that you want out of different kinds of websites. It will start with a description of how to load and parse simple sites, and, time permitting, provide strategies for working with the ASP.NET sites that many government agencies use.

    Suggested technical skills: Experience with Ruby is useful, but not necessary, as the strategies employed could easily be implemented in Python as well. However, attendees should have a basic familiarity with using a command line to execute commands (preferably in a Mac/Linux environment).

    Matchless

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    The rise of the data selfie

    Speakers: Trina Chiasson of Tableau Software; John Walton of BBC News

    Can journalists learn from hobbyist data hackers? Could combing data help us not just put the reader in the story, but make the stories about the reader themselves? This talk explores how personal relevance can help people get excited about data.

    Colorado F

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Build tools and automation for Node.js (repeat session)

    Speaker: Ryan Murphy of The Texas Tribune

    We've all been there – moving files one by one, minifying our scripts, running our CSS compilers – all by hand. But there's a better way! The proliferation of static site generators have led to an explosion of tools that make it easy to automate the tedious parts of static site building and achieve consistent results. In this workshop I'll show you how to automate tasks with Node.js, walk through how the parts interact and set you on the path of being able to automate tasks on your own.

    Comfort with working on the command line required! Experience with or awareness of Node.js recommended.

    Denver I

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    Creating snackable and shareable dataviz

    Speakers: Yvonne Leow of Vox.com; Aaron Williams of The Washington Post

    As more people turn to Facebook, Twitter and even Snapchat for news, journalists are creating and distributing data visualizations that are native to those platforms. In this session, learn about the nuances of short-form, mobile-first storytelling and why "snackable" graphics are essential to engaging younger audiences.

    Colorado E

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    GitHub 201

    Speaker: Jordan McCullough of GitHub

    This workshop is for people who are already familiar with GitHub and version control, and want to dive a little deeper. We'll cover how to use Git on the command line, why the GitHub Flow supports team collaboration, and what best practices to use on a daily basis. All participants will have a chance to experiment with using Git on the command line. We'll also cover common use cases around collaborating with GitHub, and explore features such as Forks, Pull Requests, Issues, Mentions, and more. Completely new to version control? See the GitHub 101 workshop and follow it up with this workshop!

    Independence

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Grabbing data from websites without scraping (repeat session)

    Speakers: Scott Klein of ProPublica; Michelle Minkoff of The Associated Press

    We'll show you how to get websites to give up structured data. Programming knowledge isn't required but you'll learn why it's good to have. Required software is just a web browser and some free tools and add-ons we'll tell you about.

    Prerequisites: Solid Excel. Sneakiness and Nosiness.

    Matchless

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Python (repeat session)

    Speaker: Anthony DeBarros of The Wall Street Journal

    New to Python or programming in general? This class will start with a walk-through of Python basics such as variables, data structures and logic before exploring practical tasks including web scraping.

    Mattie Silks

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating agribusiness: The data and stories behind the untapped field of our food and fuel

    Speakers: Pam Dempsey of The Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting; Peggy Lowe of Harvest Public Media; Nils Mulvad of Kaas & Mulvad

    GMO labeling. Monsanto. Factory-farming. Agribusiness is a multibillion-dollar industry with strong local, national, and international reach. It touches on many issues of our everyday lives – from food to fuel, labor, public funds, environment and government policy. Yet in-depth and investigative coverage of these important issues are scarce. We’ll share our own experiences fighting for data in international courts, turning investigative stories into compelling audio pieces and using data to produce valuable quick-hits to help you better navigate the field of agribusiness and tell deeper and more accurate stories.

    Denver III-IV

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Machine learning basics

    Speaker: Chase Davis of Star Tribune

    Prepare for the world's fastest introduction to a subject some people spend decades of their lives studying: machine learning. Specifically, we'll be talking about supervised learning: a technique that allows you to train computers to make simple decisions, which is useful (among other things) for complex data cleaning. Be warned: This session will move very quickly. The code is simple, but we won't have time to cover basic Python syntax, so some programming experience is helpful.

     

    Gold Coin

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Special Event

    Open lab (repeat)

    The open lab is a chance for conference attendees to receive live troubleshooting and guidance from some of our experienced coding teachers outside of hands-on classes. It's a space where they can get help with installation, setting up a basic development environment and other issues on their own computer.

    Colorado B-D

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    Scams and schemes

    Speakers: Acton Gorton of Chicago Tribune; Jeff Kelly Lowenstein of Grand Valley State University; Nicole Vap of KUSA/9News Denver

    This panel will take a look at fraud and deception that have victimized vulnerable and exploited laws for personal gain. We'll take a look at the documents and data you can use to investigate reverse mortgages and other property scams. You'll leave with plenty of other ideas you can take back to your newsroom to start investigating scams in your community right away.

    Colorado G-J

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    The year in CAR

    Speakers: Alex Richards of NerdWallet; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    What were the big stories of the year? What were the most creative uses of data analysis? See what your colleagues have been up to and pick up some story ideas at the same time. This session is good for: Anyone.

    Colorado F

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Demo

    When correlation is causation

    Speaker: Stijn Debrouwere of independent journalist

    Is red meat bad for your health? What's a triple-blind clinical trial? Are the Finnish really that great at mathematics? What's so significant about statistical significance? During the first half of this workshop, you'll get acquainted with concepts like confounding, selection bias, Simpson's paradox, randomization and statistical power. In the second half, it's up to you: judge your way through a series of small case studies and practice what you've learned. It's not enough to say that correlation does not imply causation. Learn exactly what stands in the way of drawing truthful conclusions from data, how to recognize great science and how to spot the flaws that invalidate statistical conclusions.

    Penrose

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Special Event

    Teaching Data and Computational Journalism - Report Launch at NICAR 2016

    We are pleased to announce the launch of "Teaching Data and Computational Journalism" at this year's NICAR conference in Denver.

    This report is the culmination of a year-long collaboration between researchers at Columbia and Stanford that was funded by the Knight Foundation.

    We have surveyed the level of instruction in data and computational skills at US journalism schools, observed classes, and interviewed dozens of data journalists and journalism instructors to better understand the pedagogical landscape and best practices in this field. The report also offers a set of model curricula to assist journalism educators in developing broader course offerings in data and computation.

    So if you will be at NICAR this year, please come out on Saturday, March 12th at 6pm to pick up a hard copy of our report and enjoy a few drinks on us. This event will be held at the conference hotel, the Denver Marriott City Center, in Colorado G-J, located on lower level 2.

    Colorado G-J

    6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Just enough Django: Distributed data entry in the newsroom *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Ben Welsh of Los Angeles Times; Ken Schwencke of ProPublica

    Ben Welsh of the Los Angeles Times, presents a step-by-step guide to creating a simple web application that empowers you to enlist reporters in data entry and refinement. The 3-hour, hands-on tutorial will teach you how to take advantage of the Django Web framework's powerful administration panel, without bothering with all the other web developer crap. You will learn how to design database tables, load in data and quickly create a system for others to improve it. 

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    Session prerequisites: If you have a good attitude and know how to take a few code crashes in stride, you are qualified for this class.

    Attendees must be registered for the conference to attend this workshop.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Matchless

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Digging into data for stories: A crash course (Sunday) *pre-registered attendees only

    This is a continuation of Saturday's hands-on workshop. Pre-registered attendees only.

    Denver V & Denver VI

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Automate and supercharge your social media

    Speaker: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR

    Learn how to use IFTTT (If This, Then That) to save time on social media and scrape information from social platforms. No programming skills required. Examples: Set up a program to download all tweets with a particular hashtag into a Google spreadsheet. Capture and save in a spreadsheet all tweets near a specific address. Automatically post tweets with a certain hashtag on Facebook or LinkedIn. Download any Instagram photo with a certain hashtag to a folder on Google Drive or Dropbox.

    Gold Coin

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Conference sales (Sunday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. The winner of the IRE T-shirt contest will be displayed and on sale.

    Colorado B-D

    9:00 am - 10:30 am

  • Panel

    Election: Sane ways of collecting candidate information

    Speakers: Eric van Zanten of DataMade; Donny Bridges of Center for Technology & Civic Life

    At DataMade we’ve found ourselves often needing to handle and organize information about candidates running for office, their campaign committees, how those committees are funded, and ultimately the outcomes of the elections that they are in. As a result, we’ve ended up finding and creating some open source tools to integrate these pieces into an extensible system for tracking this information and tying it to the people who are involved. In this session we’ll share the tools that we’ve assembled and how they might be reused.

    Denver III-IV

    9:00 am - 10:00 pm

  • Panel

    Finding US data

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    Data exist. It's up to us to find it. We will take you to the hidden places and best techniques to unearth the goldmines. We'll be focusing on local, state and national U.S. data, but international attendees can use these tips and sources to access information about their own country within the U.S.

    Colorado E

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    OpenElections hackathon

    Speakers: Serdar Tumgoren of Stanford University; Derek Willis of ProPublica

    The OpenElections team will be working on loading and publishing election results from the Mountain West at NICAR this year, and we're looking for coders interested in helping out and spending a few hours with our team. You can help us load and parse election results from 2000-2014 in different formats. Contributors can pick a year to work on, and work in teams. Or pick another state and dive in. See http://docs.openelections.net/ for ways to be involved. Your time and expertise would be most appreciated either all or part of the day. RSVP to [email protected].

    Colorado A

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    QGIS I: Importing and displaying geographic data (repeat session)

    Speaker: Alexandra Kanik of Louisville Public Media

    Not all datasets need to be mapped, but some do! This mapping class is perfect for beginners looking to learn the basics of visualizing geographic data. We'll go over how to find publicly available data, convert addresses to map points, join datasets and use the open source mapping software, QGIS.

    Denver II

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    R basics: Stats (repeat session)

    Speaker: Ryan Menezes of Los Angeles Times

    Learn how to analyze data through methods grounded in statistical theory. Those familiar with R will be introduced to regression models, significance tests, risk ratios, various distributions and more.

    Denver I

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    Seeing like a network: Learning how to think about digital security

    Speaker: Quinn Norton of independent journalist

    This interactive workshop covers what's known as "threat modeling" in the computer security world. The goal is to help participants understand how networks view them as users, how they can shape what a network sees and how to realistically defend themselves against common attacks. We'll cover some security tools and techniques, but the class is focused on understanding the networked environment well enough that attendees can tailor these to their particular situation. First, we'll look at the networks we use every day, how we relate to them and how they are used by others. Next, we'll go over some real-world attack examples that range from direct hacking, traffic analysis and implicit information to jurisdictional attacks, such as subpoenas. The last third of the workshop will be an open discussion where participants can talk about their specific needs and potential next steps.

    Penrose

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Stats primer: Making sense of data

    Speaker: Peter Gade of University of Oklahoma

    Statistics are powerful measurement tools that enhance understanding and presentation of data. This session identifies key terms and applications (e.g., error, dispersion, probability, and tests for statistical significance) that unleash the power of statistics and your ability to tell stories with numbers.

    Colorado G-J

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Career roundtable

    Speakers: Mark Horvit of University of Missouri; Chase Davis of Star Tribune; Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV; Steven Rich of The Washington Post; Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area; Nicole Vap of KUSA/9News Denver; Chrys Wu of Matchstrike LLC

    **Moderated by Mark Horvit, IRE/NICAR

    Wondering what you need to learn to take that next step in your career? Interested in which skills news organizations are prioritizing now, and what might set you up for what they'll want next? Drop by and join us for a discussion of the skills that will help you progress.

    This session is good for: Journalists of all levels who want to take their career to the next level or those looking to change direction. Hear tips on how to make it happen and ask for advice on your own path.

    Colorado G-J

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Don't let the robots win

    Speakers: Liam Andrew of The Texas Tribune; Daniel Craigmile of The Texas Tribune

    Bots, crawlers, scripts, and scrapers: at NICAR you can learn to build them, but can you defend your site from them? Whether they're built by data journalists, search engines, web archivists or malicious troublemakers, bots are substantial users of news websites. At The Texas Tribune, bots account for half of our site's traffic, and they're responsible for our search presence and our archival legacy as well as site attacks and performance problems. In this session, we'll dive into the world of bot users, and share some tips for identifying and managing these crawlers and scrapers, helping the "good" bots do their work, and keeping the "bad" ones from wreaking havoc.

    Denver III & IV

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Finding international data

    Speaker: Jonathan Stoneman of independent journalist

    So - you find yourself having to find data in a country you've never dealt with before or you'd like to explore the data available in your own country. Where do you even start? British data nerd, Jonathan Stoneman, will take us through a tried and tested path which will help unearth data in unfamiliar territory around the world. If you already have experience of this, why not come along and share?

    Colorado E

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Energy

    Speakers: Dan Boyce of Inside Energy; Jordan Wirfs-Brock of Inside Energy

    Energy is a story in every community. Net-metering? Efficiencies? Coal-powered electricity? Oil and Gas. The Inside Energy team will walk you through finding local energy stories in data you can analyze right now.

    Denver I

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    QGIS II: Manipulating, editing and analyzing geographic data (repeat session)

    Speaker: David Herzog of IRE and NICAR

    Learn more advanced desktop data mapping skills using QGIS, an open-source geographic information system (GIS). This class will cover joining data tables to maps, calculating fields and creating new mapping layers. Prerequisite: Mapping 1 with QGIS or experience using another GIS.

    Denver II

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Working with the AP Elections API

    Speakers: Sam Cohen of The Associated Press; Matt Della Volpe of The Associated Press

    This workshop will walk users step by step through creating some simple applications to consume and display data from AP’s Elections API. It will be hands on, and participants will be provided links after the session to download the code and materials on their own.

    The workshop will be most meaningful to those with any experience writing code to interact with a RESTful API. The sample applications will be developed in Python, but the concepts used to consume the AP Elections API are relevant to any programming language that can make HTTP calls.

    Gold Coin

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Advanced DocumentCloud

    Speakers: Anthony DeBarros of The Wall Street Journal; Justin Reese of DocumentCloud; Ted Han of DocumentCloud

    Join the DocumentCloud team for a walk-through of advanced features and new developments with the document research and publishing platform. We'll cover topics including automating tasks using Python and Ruby, adding custom data to documents, and our latest responsive embeds.

    Denver III & IV

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced OpenRefine: Using regular expressions (repeat session)

    Speaker: Acton Gorton of Chicago Tribune

    This class will cover using some of the advanced regular expressions and cleaning techniques available in OpenRefine.

    The session is best for: people who have used OpenRefine or its predecessor, Google Refine, for simple data cleaning tasks such as faceting, simple clustering, and common transformations.

    Gold Coin

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Bridges

    Speaker: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    Every state has bridges: how safe are yours? This is a question that appeals to everyone (we all drive and/or walk on bridges), and the National Bridge Inventory can help you answer it. In this session we'll dive into the data for Colorado, discuss additional sources, and sketch out stories that work in any city. ​

    To get the most from this session, you should have some experience working with data in spreadsheets.

    Denver I

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    How to use housing data on any beat

    Speaker: Skylar Olsen of Zillow

    Housing stories aren’t always about real estate. In this session, Zillow Senior Economist Skylar Olsen will introduce you to the sexiest dataset she’s ever met, and show you how to use it to tell stories about your community. You'll learn how to unlock stories about crime, culture, politics and much more with free housing metrics available online. It’s an election year, and Skylar will focus in particular on how to shed light on inequality in the towns and neighborhoods in your coverage area, and how to look at who is being left behind in the housing market recovery.

    Learn:

    -About housing data available on Zillow and how to download it in a usable form, all the way down to the ZIP code or neighborhood level.

    - How to mix publicly available data from Zillow, the Census, local government and various federal agencies to find and tell stories.

    -How to think about affordability, inequality, and gentrification, and how to find data and build maps to illustrate the stories unfolding on your beat.

    Read a recap of this session on the CAR Conference blog

    Colorado E

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Machine learning basics (repeat session)

    Speaker: Chase Davis of Star Tribune

    Prepare for the world's fastest introduction to a subject some people spend decades of their lives studying: machine learning. Specifically, we'll be talking about supervised learning: a technique that allows you to train computers to make simple decisions, which is useful (among other things) for complex data cleaning. Be warned: This session will move very quickly. The code is simple, but we won't have time to cover basic Python syntax, so some programming experience is helpful.

     

    Denver II

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm