Prying loose public records

  • Event: 2018 Dallas TV Watchdog Workshop
  • Speakers: Andrew Chavez of The New York Times; Paul Watler of Jackson Walker L.L.P.; Eric Wong of Jackson Walker L.L.P.
  • Date/Time: Saturday, Sep. 22 at 10:15am
  • Location: Studio C
  • Audio file: Only members can listen to conference audio

What can you get (and not get) in the way of public records in this region? Learn key strategies for crafting effective public records requests and tracking them to keep the heat on government officials.

Speaker Bios

  • Andrew Chavez (@adchavez) is a software engineer on the interactive news team at The New York Times.

  • Paul C. Watler, a partner in Jackson Walker LLP, is a board-certified Texas civil trial lawyer widely recognized for First Amendment, media law and high-stakes cases. His court victories range from opening up Love Field in Dallas for long-haul airline service to winning one of the most frequently cited Texas Supreme Court opinions on media libel law. He is a graduate of the University of Texas School of Law and is a past president of the FOI Foundation of Texas.

  • Eric is an associate in the litigation section of Jackson Walker's Dallas office.  An honor's graduate of the University of Texas School of Law, he has helped represent a variety of media entities on access and other issues.  Eric also serves as a volunteer attorney each month on the Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas's FOI Hotline, helping callers with basic issues regarding Texas and Federal open records laws. 

Related Tipsheets

  • FOI Laws for Texas Journalists
    What can you get (and not get) in the way of public records in this region? Learn key strategies for crafting effective public records requests and tracking them to keep the heat on government officials, from Paul C. Watler and Eric Wong.

  • Prying loose public records
    What can you get (and not get) in the way of public records in this region? Learn key strategies for crafting effective public records requests and tracking them to keep the heat on government officials, from Andrew Chavez, Paul C. Watler and Eric Wong.