2014 IRE Conference

The best in the business will gather for more than 100 panels, hands-on classes and special presentations about covering business, public safety, government, health care, education, the military, the environment and other key beats. Speakers will share strategies for locating documents and gaining access to public records, finding the best stories and managing investigations. Join the discussion about how to practice investigative journalism in print, broadcast, Web and alternative newsroom models.

For more information, visit our conference page.

Time and place

Thursday, Jun. 26, 2014 - Sunday, Jun. 29, 2014

San Francisco Marriott Marquis
780 Mission Street
San Francisco, California 94103


Registration information

Registration for this event is open! Click here to begin.

Hurry! Registration closes on Sunday, Jun. 29 at 12:00pm.


Schedule details

  • Outside Event

    Detecting corporate fraud - Tips from a crook and a sleuth (Sponsored by Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism)

    Speakers: Roddy Boyd of Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation; Sam Antar of whitecollarfraud.com

    The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism will offer a free pre-conference workshop from 1:30-5 p.m. on Wednesday, June 25. 
     
    Attendees will learn the fundamental methods for inspecting public filings for corporate fraud. The information gained in this session will allow reporters to spot red flags in corporate disclosures and understand when to pursue a potential fraud investigation.
     
    Instructors Roddy Boyd of the Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation and Sam E. Antar, a convicted felon and CFO of Crazy Eddie, Inc., will take an afternoon to show you how securities fraud is done and how to unearth reams of libel-proof data and facts from corporate financial filings. 
     
    Our goal is to pierce the very expensive veil companies erect so that your reporting is never again dependent upon Wall Street and corporate hacks.
     

    Salon 14-15

    1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Conference Registration (Wednesday)

    Registration will be located on lower B2 level of the San Francisco Marriott Marquis.

    Lower B2 Level

    3:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Conference Registration (Thursday)

    Registration will be located on lower B2 level of the San Francisco Marriott Marquis.

    Lower B2 Level

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Thursday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.

    Lower B2 Level

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    INN: Trends in news revenue - The view From 30,000 feet (with a detour)

    Speaker: Jesse Holcomb of Pew Research Center

    This session provides a brief overview of recent trends in news revenue, with a special focus on the non-profit sector. Drawing on Pew Research data, the session will touch on big picture shifts in advertising and audience revenue along with philanthropy, individual giving, events and other streams.

    Golden Gate B

    8:30 am - 9:00 am

  • Panel

    Welcome and overview of the conference

    If you're new to the IRE Conference, haven't attended for awhile or want to learn more about the new things on the schedule this year, come by this session, where IRE staff will explain how things work, what's changed from past conferences and how to get the most out of the next few days.

    Salon 12-13

    8:30 am - 9:00 am

  • Panel

    Data-driven ethics: Tricky questions buried in the numbers

    Speakers: Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Ricardo Sandoval-Palos of PBS; Chrys Wu of Matchstrike LLC; Sally Lehrman of Markkula Center for Applied Ethics; Eva Paterson of Equal Justice Society

    *Moderated by Sally Lehrman, Markkula Center for Applied Ethics

    Are the data too easy to interpret? Confirm commonly held stereotypes? Put sources at risk? Watch out! Data journalists must consider some thorny issues in the everlasting, far-reaching, and deep-diving environment of digital media. Esteemed civil rights lawyer Eva Paterson reveals the bias often built into data. Three expert practitioners share compelling ethics considerations that have troubled them. You join the panel in proposing some solutions.

    Salon 12-13

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    INN: The latest on philanthropy for nonprofit news and media organizations

    Speakers: Jesse Holcomb of Pew Research Center; Sue Hale of Oklahoma Watch; Tom Glaisyer of Democracy Fund; Kelly Born of Hewlett Foundation; Marie Gilot

    *Moderated by Jesse Holcomb, Pew Research Center

    This past year has seen several foundations move-on from supporting news and media, new foundations begin to invest in the space and long-serving foundations re-commit.  This year also saw unprecedented scrutiny of the ethics of philanthropy and journalism by media watchers who question the independence of the organizations supported.  This panel will look at the state of philanthropy in the space, and discuss ways to avoid ethical questions inherent in this type of support.

    Golden Gate B

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Investigations that focus on forgotten victims

    Speakers: Azmat Khan of The New York Times; Matthew Mosk of ABC News; AC Thompson of ProPublica; Jenifer McKim of New England Center for Investigative Reporting

    *Moderated by Jenifer McKim, New England Center for Investigative Reporting

    Senior citizens neglected to death, coal miners struck with black lung and blocked from help, abused children whose cries go unheard, and forgotten creditors in a city's high profile bankruptcy mess. These are stories that often go overlooked until a reporter focuses the public lens on its victims. In this panel, reporters will talk about what makes a good story, provide tips on finding unheard victims, and discuss challenges about writing three-dimensional stories about situations that aren't always clear cut.

    Salon 10-11

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Lethal lessons: Overcoming secrecy laws and other obstacles to covering the death penalty

    Speakers: Ziva Branstetter of The Washington Post; Brandi Grissom Swicegood of GateHouse Media; Richard Pienciak of The Associated Press

    *Moderated by Richard Pienciak, The Associated Press

    Reporters have been facing unprecedented access challenges surrounding death penalty executions, especially regarding key information about the lethal drugs used. How best to prepare to cover an execution in case the administration of the drug cocktail – or any other method - is botched? Panelists will talk about the history of relevant cases, past and recent; legal fights to obtain transparency – including the identities of executioners and public witnesses; how to develop sources to overcome secrecy and legal barriers; and how to dig deep on the sources of drugs used and the chemical makeup of the deadly compounds.

    Salon 14-15

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Mapping sea surges: A model for hyperlocal reporting on climate impact (Sponsored by New America Media)

    Speakers: Sandy Close of New America Media; Laura Flynn of KALW Public Radio, National Radio Project, The Intercept; Barbara Grady of Oakland Local; Jessie Liang of KTSF-San Francisco; Ngoc Nguyen of New America Media

    *Moderated by Sandy Close, New America Media

    With support from several funders, New America Media teamed up with ethnic and community media reporters, Climate Central, IRE and the Stamen Group to document with data, maps and story telling the impact of sea rise on Bay Area low-income communities of color.  It's a model that can be replicated.

    Salon 7

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Mastering the investigative interview

    Speaker: Julian Sher of Investigative Journalist

    We've all done it - blown a key interview. When the subjects of our investigations are pros at spin and subterfuge, we need more than good research. Julian Sher, the senior producer of CBC TV's the fifth estate and author of six books whose articles have appeared in the New York Times and Canadian newspapers, will teach you how to change the very way you see interviews, how to structure them in a radical new way and some key tools and techniques to succeed.

    Salon 4-6

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    News flash: Bringing investigative reporting to life with interactives

    Speakers: Tasneem Raja of The Tyler Loop; Paul Grabowicz of UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism; Josh Williams of The New York Times; Noah Veltman of WNYC - New York Public Radio

    *Moderated by Paul Grabowicz, UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

    For journalists, the tools of the trade expand every day as the formats, medium, and platforms for presenting news stories evolve. Resource-constrained newsrooms must keep up with the latest technologies not just for bottom line reasons but because technology can help us build better, more shareable stories. Charts and graphics, maps, databases from scratch, choose your own adventures, and flow charts, these tools have earned their place inside deep-dive projects. But for journalists laser-focused on reporting, where and how can thinking about data-driven interactives fit in? This panel will bring together leading interactive journalists who dove deep and lived to tell the tale. They will share tips and tactics for reporters to build their own newsroom’s interactive toolkit.

    Club Room

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Open records: Strategies for successful negotiations

    Speakers: Thomas Burke of Davis Wright Tremaine LLP; Jeff Donn of The Associated Press; Ron Nixon of The Associated Press; Andrew Siegel of CBS

    *Moderated by Andrew Siegel, CBS

    Digging out documents is a key part of life as an investigative reporter. But it seems that governments at all levels are clamping down on access to records. Learn how to successfully navigate the ins and outs of state and federal FOIA laws and win access fights.

    Salon 1-3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Rapid data publishing with Caspio (Hosted by Caspio)

    Speaker: Edward Garcia of Caspio, Inc.

    For those who are new to Caspio, this session provides a hands-on introduction to the Caspio framework for rapid database publishing. Learn how to import a public data set (Census, crime, health inspections, etc.) and quickly build an interactive searchable web app for your website. Topics covered: Importing data; Creating a searchable database; Report interfaces and layouts; Embedded deployment on your website.

    No previous Caspio experience is necessary. Laptops will be provided. Seating is limited, so pre-registration is highly encouraged for these sessions. 

    Register now to reserve your spot.

    Nob Hill D

    9:00 am - 10:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Tableau Public for beginners (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Tara Walker of Tableau Software

    Learn how to create beautiful, interactive data visualizations on short deadlines.  No programming required.  You'll learn everything you need to build data visualizations and publish them to your website just like a video.  We'll teach you how to: Connect to Excel files and other data, create maps and charts, format them beautifully and make them interactive. 

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists.  No previous experience with Tableau is necessary to take this class.  Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class.  Limited seats are available. Register for this training today.

    Nob Hill C

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    When to scrape: Tools and techniques (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Steven Rich of The Washington Post; Aaron Williams of The Washington Post

    Scraping data: Freeing the data you find on the web and making it work for you, your way. We'll talk about when you should scrape data from the web, different ways to do it and how scraping can help you repackage, analyze and offer up data automatically and in compelling ways.

    Nob Hill AB

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    5 tools in 60 minutes (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Matt Carroll of Northeastern University

    This session will walk you through the following tools:

    • Google docs. A cloud-based solution to Windows Office.
    • DocumentCloud. Analyze, annotate, and publish your documents.
    • Census Reporter. The way the US Census should have designed their site.
    • NICAR listserv. Expert technical advice.
    • Google Fusion Tables. Create embeddable, linkable charts and maps, with a medium learning curve

    Nob Hill AB

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Building trust: Getting reluctant sources to talk

    Speakers: Andres Cediel of Investigative Reporting Program; Ellen Gabler of The New York Times; Tony Kovaleski of KMGH-Denver; Ellen Weiss of Scripps Washington Bureau

    *Moderated by Ellen Weiss, The E.W. Scripps Company

    It's one of the toughest challenges any journalist faces: getting sources who don't want to talk to you, who sometimes probably shouldn't talk to you, to open up. Some of the best in the business talk about how they've gotten reluctant sources to speak, and how you can too.

    Salon 1-3

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Covering prisons, jails and "mass incarceration" (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)

    Speakers: Barry Krisberg of UC Berkeley Law School; Marisa Lagos of KQED Public Radio; Ted Gest of Criminal Justice Journalists; Paige St. John of Los Angeles Times

    Moderated by Ted Gest, Criminal Justice Journalists

    Despite falling crime rates, the U.S. remains one of the world’s incarceration leaders, with more than 2 million people in prisons and jails. Unless there’s a riot or an escape, the media tend to ignore this problem. Hear from journalists and an outside expert about the leading issues, including overcrowding, poor inmate health care, private prisons, solitary confinement, mental illness behind bars, and whether efforts by California and other states to reduce corrections populations are succeeding.

    Salon 12-13

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Fraud: The memorabilia racket

    Speakers: Philip Drechsler of NBC4 Los Angeles; Eric Flack of WUSA9 Washington; Hagit Limor of Fox19 Cincinnati; Steve Cyrkin of Autograph Magazine Live

    *Moderated by Hagit Limor, Fox19 Cincinnati

    The editor of "Autograph" magazine joins three reporters with different angles on an ongoing national fraud -- selling fake autographs as the real deal. This panel includes the expert you'll need to turn a story likely untold in your region.

    Salon 14-15

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Managing and juggling investigative work

    Speakers: Jennifer Forsyth of The Wall Street Journal; Sarah Karp of Catalyst Chicago; Liz Roldan of WFOR/CBS Miami

    This session will provide tips on how to find time to do investigative work in the midst of other newsroom demands and provide strategies for how to get that work noticed in a 24-7 news cycle. It will emphasize efficiencies and organization and will discuss the pros and cons of producing one big project versus a running investigation. The discussion will bring perspectives from traditional print, online and broadcast.

    Salon 7

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    On the beat: Education

    Speakers: Susan Ferriss of The Center for Public Integrity; Nikole Hannah-Jones of The New York Times Magazine; Jeremy Adam Smith of San Francisco Public Press; Terri Langford of independent journalist

    *Moderated by Terri Langford, The Texas Tribune

    This session will discuss how to get beyond the traditional education investigative story. Topics will include a discussion of creative documents, databases and non-traditional story ideas; how to use federal data, documents and build useful sources to write about segregation, violence, mismanagement and waste in school districts and more.

    Salon 10-11

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    The art of storytelling: Writing the data story

    Speakers: Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; David Donald of Investigative Reporting Workshop-American University; Ben Poston of Los Angeles Times

    From the first public records request to the final fact check, keeping the writing in mind will prevent your stories from becoming mind-numbing data dumps. We'll walk through how to focus your early work on finding the best cases for in-depth reporting; how to keep your data analysis on track while finding your "compared to what?"; and how to draft the data-heavy sections of stories.

    Club Room

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    The oceans: A rich source for investigative stories (Sponsored by Society of Environmental Journalists)

    Speakers: Kristy Kroeker of University of California - Davis; Lauren Sommer of KQED Public Radio; Carolyn Whetzel of Bloomberg BNA; David Helvarg of Blue Frontier Campaign

    *Moderated by Carolyn Whetzel, Bloomberg BNA

    Acidification, dead zones, overfishing, urban runoff, and marine debris are just some of the threats facing the world's oceans making headlines. At this session, panelists will dive deep into these environmental issues and take a look at the major ocean stories that are being under-reported.

    Salon 4-6

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    INN: Member programs

    Over the past four years, INN has steadily been building its programs and benefits for members.  With now 100 member organizations, these presentations will review the breadth of opportunities available to members to generate revenue, create efficiencies and increase impact:

    *INN Strategy & INNovation Fund – Kevin Davis, CEO & Executive Director, INN

    *Membership – Shelby Ilan, Membership Coordinator, INN

    *Content & Communications – Luis Gomez, Editor & Business Reporter, INN

    *Back-office Programs - Melodie Iwai, Director of Finance & Administration, INN

    *Largo Project - Adam Schweigert, Director of Technology & Ryan Nagle, News Applications Developer, INN

    *Data & Editorial Collaboration  - Denise Malan, Director of Data, INN/IRE

    *Revenue Opportunities & Impaq.Me - Lisa Williams, Director of Revenue Generation, INN

    *Community Journalism Executive Training (CJET) – Kevin Davis, CEO, INN & Anne Galloway, Editor & Executive Director, VT Digger

    *Filmed Media  - Meyer Shwartzstein & Patty Ishimoto, Brainstorm Media

    Golden Gate B

    10:15 am - 12:00 pm

  • Panel

    60 (data-driven) ideas in 60 minutes

    Speakers: Jodi Upton of Syracuse University; MaryJo Webster of Star Tribune

    If you have a few data skills and you're looking for the right ideas to try them out, here are plenty -- whether you need something for tomorrow or you have a few weeks. We've got 60 proven winners for media outlets of all sizes, coming at you fast!

    Salon 14-15

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    All about surveillance: Cameras, GPS, drones, databases and more (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)

    Speakers: Demian Bulwa of San Francisco Chronicle; Jennifer Lynch of Electronic Frontier Foundation; Ted Gest of Criminal Justice Journalists; Ali Winston of independent journalist

    *Moderated by Ted Gest, Criminal Justice Journalists

    Police and other investigative agencies increasingly are using high-tech surveillance methods, among them various kinds of cameras, license-plate readers, GPS anklets, ShotSpotter acoustic sensors, and drones. What policies govern their use? What can go wrong with them? Are they cost-effective? What records can journalists obtain about their use? Hear from reporters who are covering the new technology and an advocacy group that is keeping watch for abuses.

    Salon 12-13

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: 60 ideas in 60 minutes

    Speakers: Brian Collister of Investigative Network; Nicole Vap of KUSA/9News Denver

    This may be the one panel you will get stories you can take back to your newsroom and get started on the day you get back from IRE. These 60 stories from broadcast investigative reporters around the country will give you story ideas that will keep you busy until the IRE conference in 2015.

    Salon 7

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Hands-on

    Caspio Map Mashup (Hosted by Caspio)

    Speaker: Edward Garcia of Caspio, Inc.

    Caspio's Map Mashup automates Google map integration in a single wizard. Topics covered: Integrating a searchable database with Google Maps; Adding custom icons and filters based on criteria; Combining multiple data sources on a single map. 

    No previous Caspio experience is necessary. Laptops will be provided. Seating is limited, so pre-registration is highly encouraged for these sessions. 

    Register now to reserve your spot.

     

    Nob Hill D

    11:20 am - 12:00 pm

  • Panel

    Coverage, consequence and why staffing matters

    Speakers: Dori Maynard of The Maynard Institute for Journalism Education; Manny Garcia of USA TODAY Network; Susan Richardson of The Center for Public Integrity; Donna Tam of CNET News

    *Moderated by Dori Maynard, Maynard Institute

    Is your news organization missing key stories? Even worse, are you misinforming your audience? Discussions of newsroom diversity often focus on what it adds to a news organization. But lack of diversity can lead to mistakes and holes in a news organization's coverage. This session will examine what is missed -- and how audiences are misled or misinformed -- when a newsroom's staff lacks the diversity of the communities it covers.

    Salon 10-11

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Let's get critical: How to look at information with X-ray eyes

    Speaker: Al Tompkins of Poynter

    Investigative reporters find stories others miss. But how do you know what you’re seeing is real? What questions should you ask when sources feed you information or, you get your hands on that juicy piece of video or damning photo? We’ll walk through real case studies where the truth slipped through the cracks.  Can you afford NOT to be here to learn how to protect yourself from lies, liars and scoundrels who want to mislead you?

     

    Salon 4-6

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Search gold rush: Top 100 tips, tricks and tools to mine prospects

    Speakers: Barbara Gray of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism; Margot Williams of ICIJ

    Muckrakers will leave with a basket full of the latest tips and tools for public records research, online privacy, advanced search techniques, alerting services and personal web caching and archiving.

     

    Club Room

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    The power of the crowd: Sourcing investigations through audience engagement

    Speakers: Blair Hickman of ProPublica; Leonard Downie of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Kristin Gilger of Arizona State University; Brandon Quester of Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting

    *Moderated by Leonard Downie, Jr., ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    Audience engagement tools – from American Public Media's Public Insight Network to social media and innovative apps – are increasingly being used to expand investigative reporting and its impact by engaging the public to find information, diversify sources, compile databases, create multimedia and disseminate stories more widely. Practitioners from ProPublica, the new PIN Bureau at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and the News21 national investigative reporting project show how it can be done.

    Salon 1-3

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Demo

    Tracking subsidies with Good Jobs First (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Greg LeRoy of Good Jobs First

    States and cities spend $70 billion per year on economic development subsidies to corporations in the “economic war among the states [and suburbs].” Find out how to investigate these costly deals, including Good Jobs First’s Subsidy Tracker database that has recently been enhanced to reveal corporate parents and big-business dominance and to better enable mash-ups.

    Nob Hill AB

    11:20 am - 12:20 pm

  • Panel

    Golden Gate B

    12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:20 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Panel

    INN: Membership council meeting

    Speaker: Brant Houston of University of Illinois

    Comprised of the Executive Directors (or equivalent) for each INN member organization and fiscally sponsored project in attendance – the meeting will cover INN governance & bylaws, as well as provide time to members to cast their votes via the online form (which is open now through 6/26) for two member seats on the INN board of directors.

    Golden Gate B

    12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Brownbag: Uncovering fraud - Inside the mind of a hardcore criminal

    Speaker: Sam Antar of whitecollarfraud.com

    Grab your lunch and join a convicted felon for lessons in business. Sam Antar, the Former Crazy Eddie CFO and former CPA will share his story and offer tips and techniques for spotting fraud. Beverages will be provided.

    Salon 1-3

    12:45 pm - 2:20 pm

  • Panel

    INN: Revenue generation lightning rounds

    Speaker: Jake Batsell of Texas Tribune Fellows

    Five INN member organizations will be selected∗ to make a 5 -10 minute presentation about a key growth and/or revenue driver for their organization.  Each presenter will be asked to focus on the revenue projections, cost of acquiring the revenue, risks if any and strategic benefit to their organization. Moderated by Texas Tribune fellow & SMU Journalism Professor, Jake Batsell.

    *Tim Griggs, Jake Batsell, Texas Tribune Fellows:  “Lessons from both Inside & Out of the Texas Tribune”

    *Andy Hall, Wisconsin Center “Beyond the News Cycle: Investigative Journalism + Art”

    *Lila LaHood, SF Public Press “Lessons Learned from Kickstarter”

    *Lyle Muller, IowaCenter “Taking Investigative Journalism to Commercial Radio”

    *Naomi Schalit, Maine Center “Successfully Executing an End-of-Year Fundraising Campaign.”

    *Joe Bergantino, NECIR “Converting Audience Engagement into Financial Support”

    Golden Gate B

    1:00 pm - 2:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Rapid data publishing with Caspio (Hosted by Caspio)

    Speaker: Edward Garcia of Caspio, Inc.

    This session is a repeat of the 9 a.m. introductory training for those new to Caspio. Learn how to import a public data set (Census, crime, health inspections, etc.) and quickly build an interactive searchable web app for your website. Topics covered: Importing data; Creating a searchable database; Report interfaces and layouts; Embedded deployment on your website. 

    No previous Caspio experience is necessary. Laptops will be provided. Seating is limited, so pre-registration is highly encouraged for these sessions. 

    Register now to reserve your spot.

    Nob Hill D

    1:30 pm - 3:20 pm

  • Hands-on

    Tableau Public for pros (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Jewel Loree of Tableau Software

    Take your data visualization skills to the next level.  In this class we'll push Tableau's capabilities further to create more complex visualizations.  You'll learn how to: Clean and format dirty data, use multiple data sources in the same visualization, build more advanced visualizations and employ advanced interactive elements. 

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists.  Class participants should have some experience with Tableau or have taken the morning beginner course.  Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend the class.  Limited seats are available.  Register for this training today.

    Nob Hill C

    1:30 pm - 5:30 pm

  • IRE Board of Directors Meeting

    IRE Board Meeting

    The IRE Board of Directors will meet at 2 p.m. Thursday in San Francisco as part of the annual conference. The meeting is open to all IRE members.

    Pacific C

    2:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Joint investigations

    Speakers: Matt Drange of The Information; Cindy Galli of ABC News; Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area; Jim Strickland of WSB-Atlanta

    They seem to be popping up more and more among the national journalism award winners: Collaborations between different media partners to cover a difficult story and reveal details most might think impossible to uncover. Why do they do it? Why team up with someone else? How do they do it? What’s in it for my organization? Why even consider it? This panel will answer those questions and more. We’ll have tipsheets and examples of what works and what doesn’t. We’ll showcase successful (and even some not so successful) partnerships between different media partners to help you begin planning your next big investigation.

    Club Room

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Campus coverage: College sports (Sponsored by Lumina Foundation)

    Speakers: Paula Lavigne of ESPN; Jodi Upton of Syracuse University; Brad Wolverton of NerdWallet; Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV

    *Moderated by Jill Riepenhoff, The Columbus Dispatch

    There’s lots of fodder inside college athletic departments for meaty watchdog journalism. Learn how to dissect NCAA financial documents, how to find good investigative stories in the NCAA rule book and generally where to look to be a good muckraker inside a department that is only comfortable with journalists who cover the ball. This session will arm you with the tools you’ll need for when a scandal breaks out on your campus.

    Salon 4-6

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Complaints: A roadmap for killer stories

    Speakers: Brandon Stahl of KARE 11 Minneapolis/St. Paul; Joce Sterman of Sinclair Broadcast Group; Tisha Thompson of ESPN

    You've got a tip, a gut feeling. You just know it's happening to others but you need the meat. Delve into the world of consumer complaints and all the glorious goodies they contain. We'll show you the different kinds of complaints that are out there, how to find them and how to use them.

     

    Salon 7

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Demo

    Media as data - illuminating the undiscovered country of television news (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Roger Macdonald of Internet Archive

    Learn how the Internet Archive's television news research service repurposes closed captioning to facilitate searching, comparing, contrasting and quoting 500,000+ U.S. television news broadcasts aired in the last 4+ years. Find out how journalists and other researchers are being assisted in exploring this unique TV dataset. The collection has been recently used to analyze the media landscape in the battle for defining the Trayvon Martin story, map the world TV news covers and model responsible stewardship of content created by others.
    Targeting select 2014 Congressional election battleground districts, we are working to create a digital research archive of all election-related media, including political ads joined with FCC-required TV station reports on who paid how much for each. Learn about potentials for collaborating in creating and using this election media accountability, financing transparency and voter resource library.

    Nob Hill AB

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Presentation as a storytelling tool

    Speakers: Anthony DeBarros of The Wall Street Journal; Brad Racino of inewsource; Kate Marymont of Gannett Company, Inc.; Mark Nichols of USA TODAY Network

    *Moderated by Kate Marymont, Gannett Company, Inc.

    Design is key to attracting attention, keeping the public engaged and even getting people to do what you ask of them.
    We'll look at examples from top newsrooms and share tips and ideas on what you yourself can do to design and present brilliant stories.

    Salon 14-15

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Red light cameras

    Speakers: David Kidwell of Chicago Tribune; Noah Pransky of independent journalist; Charles Territo of American Traffic Solutions

    Just as fast as red light cameras popped up in hundreds of US cities, so did the scandals surrounding the profit-making technology. Hear from reporters who exposed government scandals - from short yellow lights to behind-the-scenes bribes - and learn about all the tools available for journalists. An industry insider joins the panel, promising a lively discussion on red light cameras and speed cameras.

    Salon 10-11

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    The Kingmakers: Tracking money and influence in politics

    Speakers: Jack Gillum of ProPublica; Viveca Novak of McClatchy; Michael Beckel of Issue One

    *Moderated by Christopher Schnaars, USA TODAY

    The campaign machinery for Mitt Romney and Barack Obama pumped $2 billion into their war chests. Super PACs collected two-thirds of their haul -- more than $800 million -- from just 150 donors. Now Democrats and Republicans are locking horns for control of Congress. What people and groups are fueling the midterm elections? We'll show you how to combine quick analysis of campaign-finance data with good ol' shoeleather reporting to find and craft smarter stories.

    Salon 12-13

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    The media's role in reporting wrongful convictions (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)

    Speakers: Jim Dwyer of The New York Times; Maurice Possley of National Registry of Exonerations; Ted Gest of Criminal Justice Journalists; David Krajicek of The Crime Report

    *Moderated by Ted Gest, Criminal Justice Journalists

    Some of the most dramatic stories in criminal justice involve wrongful convictions. How should a reporter pursue an allegation of a wrongful conviction? What are the pitfalls? Hear from one reporter who wrote a book about the science behind errors in the courtroom, another who is an expert on the National Registry of Exonerations and a third who has explored the problem of media’s taking the prosecutor’s point of view when faulty cases are filed.

    Salon 1-3

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    INN: Breakout sessions

    Attendees to elect which breakout to join ahead of time via Jotform 

    *Membership for Nonprofit Newsrooms: Scott Lewis & Mary Walter Brown, Voice of San Diego

    *Collaborative Opportunities in Data: Denise Malan, INN/IRE

    *Impact Metrics & Measurement: Lauren Fuhrmann, Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism; Jason Alcorn, InvestigateWest

    *Visually Telling True Stories: Opportunities in Film, TV, Cable & Broadband: Kevin Davis, INN; Meyer Schwarzstein & Patty Isthimto; Brainstorm Media

     

    Golden Gate B

    3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    An app for that: Mobile tech and tools for reporting

    Speaker: David Ho of The Wall Street Journal

    The mobile revolution is upon us, but how can the technology help you as a journalist? Bring your toolbox into the age of smart phones and tablets with this session on apps for gathering and producing news. Record an interview? Transcribe a speech? Archive Tweets? Track an airplane? There's an app for that. Plus learn other mobile tips, tricks and tools to supercharge your reporting.

    Salon 4-6

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Hands-on

    App styling for Web and mobile (Hosted by Caspio)

    Speaker: Edward Garcia of Caspio, Inc.

    Learn new tips and tricks for optimizing your Caspio applications for web, tablet and smartphones. Topics covered: Customizing your app's look and feel using the Style Wizard; Creating a smartphone version using the new Mobile Kit; Tips for achieving mobile-optimized and responsive design. 

    No previous Caspio experience is necessary. Laptops will be provided. Seating is limited, so pre-registration is highly encouraged for these sessions. 

    Register now to reserve your spot.

     

    Nob Hill D

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    CompStat USA

    Speakers: Ben Poston of Los Angeles Times; Steve Thompson of The Washington Post

    CompStat USA started in New York City in the mid-90’s and the CompStat crime-fighting model has been replicated by hundreds of police departments across the country. Ben and Steve will expose the flaws of the data-driven system and how it can be vulnerable to crime manipulation. They'll also provide tips on how to investigate your local department's crime data.

    Salon 12-13

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Demo

    Five popular, free tools from Knight Lab and Census Reporter (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Miranda Mulligan of Northwestern University Knight Lab; Joe Germuska of Northwestern University Knight Lab

    Come learn about how to get the most out of Census Reporter and Knight Lab technology (such as TimelineJS, StoryMapJS, SoundciteJS and JuxtaposeJS), as well as find out how to contribute.

    Nob Hill AB

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Immigration and border issues

    Speakers: Ana Arana of Fund for Investigative Journalism; Cindy Carcamo of Los Angeles Times; Bob Ortega of CNN; Alfredo Corchado of The Dallas Morning News

    **Moderated by Alfredo Corchado, The Dallas Morning News

    Join acclaimed journalist Bob Ortega, Cindy Carcamo and Ana Arana for a provocative discussion about covering thorny immigration and border issues. Topics will include how to collect data from stonewalling officials, develop sources in no-man’s land and how to face the challenges of covering gray areas and nuances at a time of hyper-sensitivities and political piñatas.

    Salon 7

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: Business (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Michael Braga of GateHouse Media; Jason Dearen of The Associated Press; Jeffrey Pohlman of CNBC; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University

    *Moderated by Cheryl Phillips, The Seattle Times

    Get key strategies from award-winning business reporters. Topics include getting the story in deeds and mortgage documents, using  FOIA with regulators to uncover what’s really happening (case study on fracking) and learning to develop whistleblowers and defend against companies trying to spike a story.

    Salon 1-3

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Open records: New challenges to access

    Speakers: Jeff Glasser of Los Angeles Times; Joanna Lin of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Ryan Sabalow of Indianapolis Star; Steve Zansberg of Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz, LLP

    *Moderated by Stephen Zansberg, Colorado Freedom of Information Coalition

    Across the nation, government agencies are conducting public business via digital and cloud-based platforms. This panel explores the challenges these technologies pose to obtaining access to public records, including costs associated with obtaining copies, accessing raw data in digitized form, obtaining information from third-party vendors, and the panoply of statutory exemptions that are frequently invoked to withhold information.  The panelists will offer practical tips on how to navigate around and overcome these roadblocks.

    Salon 10-11

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    The year in investigative reporting

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    Pick up some story ideas and be inspired with the highlights of some of the year's best investigations.

    Club Room

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    INN: Free legal resources

    Speakers: Cindy Gierhart of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press; Emily Grannis of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press; Jaimie Schuman of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press

    Whether you’ve been shut out of a courtroom, can’t get those documents from a government agency, wonder whether hyperlinking in your blog posts offers any protection from defamation, or are told by a police officer that you can’t shoot still and video images on a public street, the Reporter's Committee for Freedom of the Press has the tools and resources to help you fight back. In this session, legal fellows from the Reporter's Committee will quickly walk you through the myriad free online, mobile and personal-assistance resources available to all working journalists.

    Golden Gate B

    4:45 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Panel

    Best of broadcast

    Speaker: Tisha Thompson of ESPN

    Watch and listen as more than a dozen photographers, editors and producers behind this year's winning entries describe how they did it and what they were really thinking when things got hard.

    Club Room

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Docs!Docs!Docs!

    Speakers: Ted Han of DocumentCloud; Shane Shifflett of The Wall Street Journal; Jonathan Stray of Columbia Journalism School; Mike Tigas of ProPublica; Tyler Dukes of WRAL-Raleigh

    *Moderated by Tyler Dukes, WRAL-Raleigh

    There's a whole world of data journalism beyond numbers, as the NSA files demonstrate! Fortunately there are now good tools for every aspect of document work in journalism. FOIAMachine automates filing and tracking your FOIA requests. DocumentCloud is the standard tool to import, annotate and publish documents. Overview automatically sorts and visualizes thousands or millions of pages in any format for super fast reporting. TabulaPDF is a one-stop solution to extracting tables from PDFs. Come get your document on!

    Salon 12-13

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating Hollywood

    Speakers: Gary Baum of The Hollywood Reporter; Richard Verrier of Los Angeles Times; Harriet Ryan of Los Angeles Times

    The entertainment industry's multi-billion-dollar annual cultural output deeply affects the lives of consumers across the globe. But its complex machinations are uniquely opaque, even to insiders. Three L.A.-based reporters covering this key local business sector reveal what's at stake, who's in play, why it matters and how they penetrate a hermetic world built on fantasy to reveal its honest truths.

     

    Salon 1-3

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating natural and environmental disasters

    Speakers: Mike Baker of The Seattle Times; Alexandra Berzon of The Wall Street Journal; Randy Loftis of Society of Environmental Journalists; Susanne Rust of Columbia University

    *Moderated by Susanne Rust, The Center for Investigative Reporting

    Mud slides! Oil spills! Chemically contaminated rivers! While all the other reporters are talking to the hysterical neighbor who lost her dog, what should you be focusing on? And where are good places to start looking? Reporters from across the country will provide tips and tell stories about how best to report on these natural and environmental disasters -- all the while keeping an eye on the investigative stories such events are bound to reveal.

    Salon 14-15

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Demo

    Mapping tools (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Michael Corey of Star Tribune; David Herzog of IRE and NICAR

    Analyzing data geographically can help reporters uncover issues, tell better stories and visualize. In this session you'll see the power of mapping unleashed. Presenters will explain tools and offer tricks to help you create better maps.

    Nob Hill AB

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Raising the roof: Investigating housing

    Speakers: Kate Berry of American Banker; Angela Caputo of APM Reports; Michael LaForgia of The New York Times; Nancy Amons of WSMV-Nashville

    *Moderated by Nancy Amons, WSMV-Nashville

    Three journalists whose work demonstrates a deep understanding of housing reveal where to find golden nuggets of fact. From how slumlords grow rich off taxpayers to how banks bury important information in plain sight, this panel will provide solid advice on how-to cut through the clutter to efficiently get to the housing stories audiences will notice.

    Salon 4-6

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Small newsrooms,big stories: Doing data-driven investigations with limited resources

    Speakers: Liam Dillon of Los Angeles Times; Eric Eyre of Charleston Gazette-Mail; Kate Martin of Carolina Public Press; Daniel Gilbert of The Seattle Times

    *Moderated by Daniel Gilbert, The Wall Street Journal

    For the beat reporter at a small news organization, the spreadsheet is your friend. We’ll cover ways to use data in your daily reporting and as a springboard for investigations. But how do you get editors to sign off for a big project while managing your daily obligations? We’ll share our best strategies.

    Salon 10-11

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    The art of storytelling: Structure, organization and finding characters

    Speakers: Joan McClane of Chattanooga Times Free Press; Raquel Rutledge of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Michael Schiller of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; James Neff of The Philadelphia Inquirer

    *Moderated by James Neff, The Seattle Times

    You've found the facts and have hard-edged findings. Now what? This panel shows you how to best exploit your materials to craft engaging investigations through appropriate story structure, proper use of characters, clear writing, and effective use of sound and video.

    Salon 7

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    INN: INN & public media: The new and growing alliance

    Speakers: Brant Houston of University of Illinois; Margaret Freivogel of St. Louis Public Radio; Laura Frank of Rocky Mountain PBS; Jason Alcorn of American Journalism Project; Lorie Hearn of inewsource; David Weir of KQED Public Radio

    *Moderated by Brant Houston, University of Illinois

    A discussion of the various models that INN members are already working with various public media entities and, more importantly, the strengths and risks in long-term collaboration between INN members and public media.

    Golden Gate B

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Reception

    Welcome reception (Co-sponsored by Esri and KQED Public Radio)

    Kick off the conference with a welcome reception on Thursday night beginning at 6 p.m. Meet up with friends you have not seen since last year and welcome new attendees.

    Each attendee will receive one drink ticket for beer, wine, soda or bottled water.

    Salon 8

    6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Conference Registration (Friday)

    Registration will be located on lower B2 level of the San Francisco Marriott Marquis.

    Lower B2 Level

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Friday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.

    Lower B2 Level

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Beyond barriers: How to get the story when you don't know the language & culture (Sponosred by Asian American Journalists Association)

    Speakers: Monica Campbell of PRI's The World; Bernice Yeung of ProPublica; Fernando Diaz of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Matt O'Brien of Oakland Tribune; Vanessa Hua of independent journalist

    *Moderated by Fernando Diaz, HOY Newspaper

    Experts with extensive experience covering ethnic communities here and abroad will share strategies on earning trust, cultivating sources and finding stories despite not knowing the language. Learn how to develop solid strategies for finding stories with impact and thorough reporting while turning possible cultural barriers into opportunities.

    Salon 4-6

    8:50 am - 9:50 am

  • Panel

    Book 'em: Getting your work published

    Speakers: Jo Becker of The New York Times; Adam Goldman of The New York Times; Miriam Pawel of independent journalist; Josh Meyer of POLITICO

    *Moderated by Josh Meyer, Medill National Security Journalism Initiative

    Book writing is one of the last bastions left of good investigative reporting, especially for those not still working for the large mainstream media outlets, and it’s a great way to make use of all that research you did for your project (and to make some money to boot!). And even though bookstores are closing, there are tons of exciting opportunities on publishing’s digital frontier. These published author/journalists share their best advice, lessons learned and cautionary tales.

    Salon 1-3

    8:50 am - 9:50 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Management - Picking the stories and staying the course

    Speakers: Matt Goldberg of NBCUniversal; Mikel Schaefer of WVUE-New Orleans; Rhonda Schwartz of Brian Ross Investigates; Letitia Walker of KATC-Lafayette

    *Moderated by Matt Goldberg, NBC Bay Area

    News managers will talk about the story selection process, commitment and investment necessary to get results. Discover what it takes to get a project green lit from the network to a local newsroom and how to keep the momentum alive. 

    Golden Gate B

    8:50 am - 9:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Getting started with Excel

    Speaker: David Donald of Investigative Reporting Workshop-American University

    In this introduction to spreadsheets you'll begin analyzing data with Excel, a simple but powerful tool. You'll learn how to enter data, sort it and conduct simple calculations like average and median. Time allowing, you’ll even learn to create a basic visualization of your data.

    Nob Hill D

    8:50 am - 9:50 am

  • Panel

    Investigating human rights in the Americas (Sponsored by Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma and Ochberg Society for Trauma Journalism)

    Speakers: Alberto Arce; Alfredo Corchado of The Dallas Morning News; Jeff Kelly Lowenstein of Grand Valley State University; Richard Marosi of Los Angeles Times

    *Moderated by Jeff Kelly Lowenstein, Columbia College Chicago

    Join acclaimed journalists Alberto Arce and Alfredo Corchado for an engaging and informative discussion about investigating human rights abuses in the Americas.  Topics will include how to gain access to official and unofficial documents, work sensitively with sources and navigate issues of personal safety in countries where public records are not readily available and reporters face real threats of bodily harm.  The session will have practical tips and plenty of time for audience participation.

    Salon 10-11

    8:50 am - 9:50 am

  • Panel

    Lies, real lies, and fundraising figures (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Bill Allison of Foreign Policy; Jonathan Salant of NJ Advance Media; Edwin Bender of National Institute on Money in State Politics

    The plural of anecdote is not data. Veteran federal and state campaign finance watchers show how to find the information you need and how to properly report fundraising figures as you cut through the candidates' spin and avoid writing stories that aren't supported by the facts.

    Salon 12-13

    8:50 am - 9:50 am

  • Panel

    The data-driven story: Conceiving, launching and taking it home

    Speakers: Anthony Cormier of Sarasota Herald-Tribune; Jaeah Lee of independent journalist; Rob O'Dell of The Arizona Republic; Shawn McIntosh of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    *Moderated by Shawn McIntosh, The Atlanta-Journal Constitution

    Turning a kernel of an idea into a killer data-driven story takes more than shoe leather; discipline and structure are required. We’ll provide tips for every step of the process, from nurturing ideas and obtaining data to engaging readers and viewers with sparkling writing and data interactivity. These steps will work in newsrooms small and large, from more routine data-driven stories to the most ambitious projects.

    Salon 7

    8:50 am - 9:50 am

  • Panel

    The Get: Tracking down newsmakers like Edward Snowden

    Speakers: Richard Esposito of Roundhouse Productions; Matthew Cole of NBC News

    Edward Snowden, the systems analyst whose revelations roiled the intelligence community, agreed to sit down with NBC’s Brian Williams for his first U.S .TV interview. The interview would last nearly five hours. Snowden would tell  Williams in great detail why he felt it essential to expose what members of the intelligence community viewed as “the crown jewels.” The two journalists who pursued and landed the interview talk about what it took to make it happen, bumps they ran into along the way and factors journalists should consider when trying to land the big interview.

    Salon 8

    8:50 am - 9:50 am

  • Demo

    The Investigative SmartGrid (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Stefan Candea of Romanian Centre for Investigative Journalism

    The Investigative SmartGrid is a new, open business model for journalism. Stefan Candea will explain how he developed the model, shortlisted for the 2013 European Press Prize's Innovation Award. In this session you'll see a case study on how three open and collaborative modules were integrated: a media lab, a local investigative journalists group and a regional publication platform. You'll leave the session with ideas on how this business model, which gets away from the typical advertisement-based model, can be replicated, enhanced and implemented by anyone.

     

    Nob Hill AB

    8:50 am - 9:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Web scraping for any reporter

    Speaker: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    Learn to scrape data from websites without having to write any code. Helium Scraper* provides a point-and-click interface for grabbing valuable data locked in web pages. *For PCs only. The software is $99 but attendees will be given a coupon code for 50 percent off that price.

    Nob Hill C

    8:50 am - 9:50 am

  • Panel

    Breaking the silence: Getting the story when officials, agencies won't talk

    Speakers: Corey Johnson of Tampa Bay Times; Kathleen Johnston of Indiana University; Liz Navratil of Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; Brian Ross of Brian Ross Investigates

    *Moderated by Brian Ross, ABC News

    This session will be a question-and-answer style panel that focuses on what you do when you hit major roadblocks while trying to pursue a story and how you get around them.

    Salon 8

    10:00 am - 11:00 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Visual storytelling

    Speakers: Mark Greenblatt of Scripps Washington Bureau; Evan Stulberger of WNBC New York City; Jim O'Donnell of NBC10 Philadelphia

    How do you show a conflict of interest—in pictures and video? What camera angle best represents the "middle class?" Pairing images and original graphics with abstract ideas can prove challenging when building investigative pieces for television and online video. This panel of expert storytellers will share creative methods, revealing strategies and memorable techniques that won’t just bring video-poor stories to life, but will transform them into clear, powerful pieces that connect with audiences.

    Golden Gate B

    10:00 am - 11:00 am

  • Panel

    Campus coverage: Student loans, debt and aid (Sponsored by the Lumina Foundation)

    Speakers: Lauren Asher of Institute for College Access & Success (TICAS); Holly Hacker of The Dallas Morning News; Gordon Russell of The Advocate; Lana Durban Scott of WRTV-Indianapolis

    *Moderated by Lana Durban Scott, The E.W. Scripps Company

    The high cost of a college education has become a hot national issue and a story that can be done locally in communities throughout the country. Learn how to dig into information and data on student debt and related issues to report on the impact in your community.

    Salon 4-6

    10:00 am - 11:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Formulas for stories in Excel

    Speaker: Ryann Grochowski Jones of ProPublica

    Much of Excel's power comes in the form of formulas. In this class you'll learn how to use them to analyze data with the eye of a journalist. Yes, math will be involved, but it's totally worth it! This class will show you how calculations like change, percent change, rates and ratios can beef up your reporting.

    Nob Hill D

    10:00 am - 11:00 am

  • Panel

    Investigating nonprofits: From bowl games to America's worst charities (Sponsored by Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism)

    Speakers: Craig Harris of The Arizona Republic; Paula Lavigne of ESPN; Kendall Taggart of BuzzFeed News; Kris Hundley of Tampa Bay Times

    *Moderated by Kendall Taggart, The Center for Investigative Reporting

    This session will highlight red flags reporters can use to find stories within the massive universe of tax-exempt organizations. Speakers will cover the spectrum of nonprofit organizations spanning from small, personal slush funds to large, money-making sports empires to private foundations. They'll guide you through the Form 990 and other untapped documents. You'll leave with at least 10 solid tips for taking on an investigation of your own.

    Salon 12-13

    10:00 am - 11:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Make dirty data shine with OpenRefine

    Speaker: Garance Burke of Stanford University

    Got a big data set that's full of dirty data? OpenRefine to the rescue! In a few easy steps, you'll have polished data in no time. And it's free. OpenRefine is more powerful than a spreadsheet, more interactive and visual than scripting, more provisional/exploratory/experimental/playful than a database. A hands-on workshop. No programming required.
    Prerequisite: Some spreadsheet familiarity.

    Nob Hill C

    10:00 am - 11:00 am

  • Panel

    Managers track: Bulletproofing stories, anticipating missteps and managing blowback

    Speakers: Patricia DiCarlo of CNN; Mark Schoofs of University of Southern California - Annenberg; Blake Morrison of Thomson Reuters; Maud Beelman of The Howard Center for Investigative Reporting

    *Moderated by Maud Beelman, The Dallas Morning News

    The A-to-Z of bulletproofing investigative projects, including anticipating and managing the blowback that the best of them engender. We’ll start at the very beginning -- choosing the right reporter(s) -- and we'll offer tips for ensuring accuracy of fact and tone throughout the investigation. We'll also cover the unique challenges of bulletproofing on multiple platforms, including broadcast.

    Salon 1-3

    10:00 am - 11:00 am

  • Demo

    PACER - Finding federal court cases (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Matt Clark of Newsday; Ryan Gabrielson of ProPublica

    The demonstration will provide information on the types of information available on-line from the Federal Courts and the best, most cost effective ways to use PACER. In addition, other public access services offered by the Federal Judiciary will be discussed.

    Nob Hill AB

    10:00 am - 11:00 am

  • Panel

    The art of storytelling: Toxic pipeline

    Speaker: Walt Bogdanich of The New York Times

    As part of our “master class” series, three-time Pulitzer winner Walt Bogdanich will dissect his classic 2007 Toxic Pipeline investigation. These special panels are designed to dig deep into narrative arc, structure and character development. If you plan to attend this panel, please read the story in advance. We’d like attendees to be familiar with the project, which should lead to a more robust discussion of the story-telling choices. Toxic pipeline

    Salon 7

    10:00 am - 11:00 am

  • Panel

    The parched west (Sponsored by Society of Environmental Journalists)

    Speakers: Andrew Fahlund of California Water Foundation; Peter Gleick of Pacific Institute; Matt Weiser of The Sacramento Bee; Lauren Sommer of KQED Public Radio

    *Moderated by Lauren Sommer, KQED Public Radio

    Drought. It’s potentially the story-of-the-year in California, as the Golden State takes its turn as a national poster state for dry times. While California is experiencing it’s third dry year in a row Arizona, Nevada and other states in the southwest U.S. have been grappling with a 12-year dry stretch. At this session, leading water journalists, scientists and others will discuss how California and other states are coping with the drought and rethinking water policies.

    Salon 10-11

    10:00 am - 11:00 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Undercover on a budget

    Speakers: Anna Hewson of KUSA/9News Denver; Bryan Staples of WTVF-Nashville; Steve Eckert of KARE 11 Minneapolis/St. Paul; Joe Ellis of KVUE/ABC Austin

    *Moderated by Steve Eckert, KARE 11 Minneapolis/St. Paul

    National award winning reporters and photojournalists share strategies for planning and executing undercover projects without breaking the bank.  See examples of creative ways to use off-the-shelf consumer cameras, as well as professional hidden cameras, to get crisp audio and compelling video.

    Golden Gate B

    11:10 am - 12:10 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Python

    Speaker: Anthony DeBarros of The Wall Street Journal

    New to Python (or programming in general)? We'll get you started with an overview of the basics, plus plenty of code examples you can put to use right away.
    This session is good for: People who know their way around a computer and are ready to dive into programming.

    Nob Hill C

    11:10 am - 12:10 pm

  • Panel

    Managers track: Creating a culture of creativity - Pushing your newsroom to push the envelope

    Speakers: Shazna Nessa of The Wall Street Journal; Andrew Donohue of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Leticia Britos Cavagnaro of Stanford University

    *Moderated by Andrew Donohue, The Center for Investigative Reporting

    Silicon Valley says fail early and often. Investigative reporting says even the smallest errors are unacceptable. So how do we create a culture that encourages risk taking and creativity when so much is on the line? Attend this panel to learn how.

    Salon 1-3

    11:10 am - 12:10 pm

  • Panel

    Mining documents to build your investigation

    Speakers: Tony Capaccio of Bloomberg News; Marina Walker Guevara of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Chris Hamby of BuzzFeed; James Neff of The Philadelphia Inquirer

    *Moderated by James Neff, The Seattle Times

    This panel will discuss how to organize, analyze and find the story when confronted with thousands if not millions of records. Tips will also include overlooked sources for public records, tools for organizing and analyzing, and tactical use of FOIA for quick hits.

    Salon 8

    11:10 am - 12:10 pm

  • Hands-on

    Pivot tables for stories

    Speaker: Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    A look at the awesome power of pivot - and how to use it to analyze your dataset in minutes rather than hours.
    This session will be most helpful if: You are familiar with formulas in Excel or another spreadsheet program.

    Nob Hill D

    11:10 am - 12:10 pm

  • Panel

    Sex crimes: Unraveling the facts about the offenders and the evidence (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)

    Speakers: Sally Kestin of Sun Sentinel; Keli Rabon of independent journalist; Christine Willmsen of WBUR; Ted Gest of Criminal Justice Journalists; Karisa King of Las Vegas Review-Journal

    *Moderated by Ted Gest, Criminal Justice Journalists

    Sex crimes typically get prominent play in the media, but many journalists don’t delve into the systemic issues of how criminal justice agencies and the military handle allegations and investigations. Among the issues to be discussed in this panel are how Florida released hundreds of sexually violent predators who attacked again; why much of the evidence in “rape kits” may go untested and prosecution rates are low; how 20 states can spend large sums confining sex offenders indefinitely, and how military sex-assault victims face retaliation and accusations of mental illness.

    Salon 12-13

    11:10 am - 12:10 pm

  • Panel

    Ten things you should know about searching with Google

    Speaker: Daniel Russell of Google

    We all use Google everyday, but are you getting the maximum investigative power with your current skills?  Dan will cover both search features in Google Search, Google Maps, Google Now, and Google Earth that you should know for maximum search effectiveness.  In addition, we'll talk about the changing nature of online content (and why you need to know about these changes).  An entirely new presentation from last year, with a new tip sheet. 

    Salon 4-6

    11:10 am - 12:10 pm

  • Panel

    The art of storytelling: Blueprints

    Speaker: Jacqui Banaszynski of Missouri School of Journalism

    Where to start? How to nail that ending? What to put where? Story structure vexes even the most experienced writers. We’ll explore ways to approach your stories as literal but creative structures — story houses built on a solid foundation, with an elegant flow and the most effective use of your material. All the great buildings of the world started with a sound, creative blueprint; you can build cathedrals of information and meaning.

    Salon 10-11

    11:10 am - 12:10 pm

  • Demo

    The latest tools from Sunlight Labs (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Bill Allison of Foreign Policy; Nancy Watzman of Lynx LLC

    Get a guided tour through the latest tools from the Sunlight Foundation, including resources for tracking federal and state legislation, regulatory dockets, campaign finance and much much more

    Nob Hill AB

    11:10 am - 12:10 pm

  • Panel

    The other war: Cracking down on journalists and whistleblowers

    Speakers: Beatrice Edwards of Government Accountability Project (GAP); Daniel Ellsberg of Freedom of the Press Foundation; Trevor Timm of Freedom of the Press Foundation; Betty Medsger of independent journalist; Linda Jue of G.W. Williams Center for Independent Journalism

    *Moderated by Linda Jue, G.W. Williams Center for Independent Journalism

    The War on Terror has provided the raison d'etre for the massive build up of the surveillance state and the rise of other increasingly restrictive government and corporate measures that are now tripping alarm bells about threats to our civil liberties. Many of those bells were set off by whistleblowers who could no longer ignore their conscience, along with the journalists who were willing to listen to them. Hence we are seeing the most aggressive and destructive campaign waged against whistleblowers and journalists in presidential history. This campaign has destroyed lives, ruined families, exacted immeasurable psychological and physical costs, and ultimately resulted in the demonization of those willing to step forward. Journalists, in particular, face urgent questions about how to protect their sources and themselves, as well as whether they shouldn't more aggressively challenge this "other war."
    Join four prominent speakers in a provocative discussion about the new, more dangerous threats to whistleblowers, why going through "official channels" hasn't worked, what journalists should and shouldn't do when working with whistleblowers, what countermeasures are being developed to protect whistleblowers and ensure that vital stories involving government and corporate secrecy and corruption see the light of day.

    Salon 7

    11:10 am - 12:10 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:10 pm - 1:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Media lawyers brown bag

    Speakers: Angela Galloway of Davis Wright Tremaine LLP; Jeff Glasser of Los Angeles Times; Leila Knox of Bryan Cave LLP

    Does your investigation contain complex legal questions? Unsure of how to proceed? During the media lawyers brown bag, between 12:30 and 1:15 p.m. on Friday, June 27, bring your lunch and your questions for a personal discussion with some prominent media law experts that will be presenting throughout the 2014 IRE Conference. We'll provide drinks and dessert.

    Salon 1-3

    12:30 pm - 1:15 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: The attorneys

    Speakers: Amanda Leith of NBCUniversal Media LLC; Lee Williams of CNN; Phil Williams of WTVF-Nashville

    *Moderated by Phil Williams, WTVF-Nashville

    This session will focus on the latest legal issues confronting broadcasters engaged in watchdog and investigative reporting. Plus, there will be time to ask the attorneys about the issues on your mind.

    Golden Gate B

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Panel

    Clean energy: How to find and tell the best stories

    Speakers: Jeffrey Ball of Stanford University; Jeff St. John of Greentech Media; Ucilia Wang of independent journalist; Mary Fricker of RepoWatch.org

    *Moderated by Mary Fricker, RepoWatch.org

    The way we get our energy and what we do with it is being fundamentally transformed. Our job as journalists is to help Americans sort through the options being pushed by powerful interests on all sides. We've rarely faced a more challenging or exciting assignment. At this panel you'll get valuable resources and connect with IRE colleagues who can help as you develop these groundbreaking stories.

    Salon 4-6

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: Local government

    Speakers: Patti Epler of Honolulu Civil Beat; Norberto Santana of Voice of OC; Michael Stoll of San Francisco Public Press; Matthew Doig of USA TODAY Network

    *Moderated by Matthew Doig, Newsday

    DO NOT attend this panel discussion. Your stories should be boring rewrites of the press releases and reports we give out to make us look better. If you listen to these dangerous people, you might learn how to get the documents and stories that expose our incompetence and/or corruption. So skip this session and visit Alcatraz.
    Sincerely, Bureaucrats From the Agency You Cover

    YBB Salon 12-13

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Demo

    PDF madness (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Tyler Dukes of WRAL-Raleigh; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University

    If you've ever been on the receiving end of a records dump delivered in PDF, you know how challenging it can be to effectively analyze the information locked inside. We'll demonstrate low-cost, easy-to-use technology for handling the most problematic PDFs, including data-packed government reports, scanned images and password-protected documents. By approaching PDFs with a simple set of questions, we'll show you how to save time and apply a method to the madness. And we will leave some room for Q & A and troubleshooting if you have a specific issue you are trying to solve too.

    Nob Hill AB

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Stop drowning in data. Start making sense! (part 1)

    Speaker: Peter Aldhous of BuzzFeed News

    Using a free Firefox add-on, and some simple code that anyone can understand (it's practically plain English), we'll learn how to "interview" sprawling datasets to find strong reporting leads, using data from this story. (Or in geek-speak: An introduction to SQLite databases.)

    We’ll also go over the basics like: What is a database and how does it differ from a spreadsheet? We’ll then dig into the drug company Pfizer and its payments to doctors using Structured Query Language (SQL). We'll filter data using SELECT and WHERE, and sort it using ORDER BY. Then we'll aggregate the data to ask questions like "how much?" and "how many?" using GROUP BY, COUNT, SUM and HAVING. We'll work with numbers and text, and learn to use LIKE and wildcard symbols to deal with messy text entries.

    Nob Hill D

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Panel

    The art of storytelling: Forensics

    Speaker: Jacqui Banaszynski of Missouri School of Journalism

    Learn to investigate your own writing from the inside out. What are the habits and patterns that power your stories up — or drag them down? You’ll do a diagnostic of your own writing and discover ways to make your stories leaner, cleaner and more compelling. This is a hands-on workshop. Please bring hard copies of at least three pieces of your own writing (not yet line-edited by someone else) and at least two highlighter pens of different colors.

    Salon 10-11

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Panel

    They're talking behind your back: Requesting emails, texts and more

    Speakers: Emily Grannis of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press; Jack Gillum of ProPublica; Doug Pardue of independent journalist; Mike McGraw of Kansas City Public Television (KCPT)

    *Moderated by Mike McGraw, Kansas City Public Television

    Learn proven strategies for getting texts, documents and emails and making FOIA work for you.

    Salon 7

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Torturing Excel to do stats

    Speaker: Steve Doig of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    You don't need a fancy pants program to compute several different sorts of statistics. In this session, you'll learn how to compute basic descriptive statistics in Excel. You'll also learn how to run correlations and regressions in Excel.

    This session will be most helpful if: You already are comfortable with using functions in Excel.

    Nob Hill C

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Panel

    Ukraine: Investigating amid political upheaval

    Speakers: Drew Sullivan of Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project; Denis Bigus of YanukovychLeaks Project; Lesya Ivanova of YanukovychLeaks Project

    *Moderated by Drew Sullivan, Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project

    Some of the most dynamic journalism this year has happened in Ukraine. Journalists have been through revolution and war.; they have rescued presidential documents from destruction while avoiding at times their own destruction.  Hear the experiences of a YanukovychLeaks team member on how he helped save shredded and burned documents and a journalist from Crimea who saw her home switch countries.

    Salon 1-3

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Panel

    Unmasking the cheaters: From biogenesis to BALCO

    Speakers: Tim Elfrink of Miami New Times; T.J. Quinn of ESPN; Lance Williams of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Mark Fainaru-Wada of ESPN

    *Moderated by Mark Fainaru-Wada, ESPN

    It’s been 11 years since BALCO exploded into the public consciousness: A grand jury, designer steroids, baseball, Barry Bonds. Fans were forced to confront widespread fraud in sports. Yet, a decade later, has anything really changed? The Biogenesis scandal reads like BALCO 2.0, laying hollow baseball’s claims to have cleaned up its act. Three reporters who broke these stories discuss their techniques, steroids in sports and how to cover a topic that just won’t go away.

    Salon 8

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Demo

    Banjo - The Secret weapon for breaking news & investigative reporting (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Jennifer Peck of Banjo

    Banjo was introduced last year at IRE and since then has been used for breaking news around the globe. NBC said, "Banjo gives you an advantage. It allows you to have an extra set of eyes & ears on the ground. You can get the information more quickly, get it confirmed faster, & get it out there." During this demo, you will see how this powerful tool can help you break news by dropping into any part of the world to get instant on the ground access and even go back in time to re-create a timeline of events.

    Nob Hill AB

    2:40 pm - 3:40 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Writing for broadcast

    Speakers: Michael Kirk of FRONTLINE; Vicky Nguyen of NBC News; Andy Pierrotti of WXIA-Atlanta

    Whether you write quick-turn investigations or long-format documentaries, this panel will help you turn complicated material into compelling broadcast stories. TV veterans or  newspaper reporters turned broadcasters will benefit from this show and tell panel. Andy Pierrotti with KVUE News/ABC in Austin will explain how to create more memorable moments with less script, investigative reporter Vicky Nguyen with KNTV NBC Bay Area will show you how to use a variety of storytelling techniques to create compelling content on air and online and Michael Kirk, a founder of PBS’ FRONTLINE and producer/director/writer of dozens of documentaries will reveal the secrets  of telling complicated investigative stories with maximum impact.

    Golden Gate B

    2:40 pm - 3:40 pm

  • Panel

    Cross-border investigations

    Speakers: Paul Radu of Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project; Gerard Ryle of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Rana Sabbagh of Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project; Trish Wilson of The Associated Press

    *Moderated by Trish Wilson, The Associated Press

    Cross-border collaborations offer a new model for investigative journalism, one that can make a world of difference in landing a hot story. This approach offers journalists who would normally focus on one country a wider, global platform. Data difficult to obtain in one country is often available in others, and the cross-border strategy makes better use of dwindling resources. This panel will show you how it’s been used --  from organized crime and corruption investigations to foreign policy debacles.

    Salon 7

    2:40 pm - 3:40 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating religion

    Speakers: Madeleine Baran of American Public Media; Eric Gorski of Chalkbeat; Stuart Watson of Independent Media; Kevin Davis of Institute for Nonprofit News

    *Moderated by Kevin Davis, Investigative News Network

    Today, religious institutions, citizens and practices touch all aspects of civil society and have a significant influence on American Politics. This panel will focus on methodologies and strategies for effectively covering this beat. In particular, our experienced panelists will discuss how to follow the money, follow the real estate and, perhaps most importantly, how to leverage public records to uncover the often opaque holdings and expenditures by and on behalf of religious institutions

    Salon 8

    2:40 pm - 3:40 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating veterans issues (Sponsored by Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma)

    Speakers: Aaron Glantz of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Bruce Shapiro of Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma; Michael Phillips of The Wall Street Journal

    *Moderated by Bruce Shapiro, Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma

    Wait times at VA hospitals have become a national issue, but they are only one of many problems faced by veterans. Learn where to find information to tell stories at the local and national level to dig into the difficulties faced by veterans.

    Salon 12-13

    2:40 pm - 3:40 pm

  • Panel

    Legacy of the Chauncey Bailey Project

    Speakers: Bob Butler of NABJ; Mary Fricker of RepoWatch.org; Thomas Peele of Bay Area News Group; Robert Rosenthal

    *Moderated by Robert Rosenthal, The Center for Investigative Reporting

    On the morning of August 2, 2007, Chauney Bailey, the editor of the Oakland Post was walking to his office in Oakland when a masked man carrying a shotgun ran up to him and fired three times. Bailey was assassinated because he was a journalist. A group of journalists in the Bay Area, many of whom had known and worked with Bailey, came to together with the goal of bringing his killers to justice and to continue the investigation he was working on. This panel will discuss the challenges, risks, and the satisfaction gained from a unique and important collaboration.

    Salon 4-6

    2:40 pm - 3:40 pm

  • Panel

    Managers track: Watchdog teams and newsroom teamwork - How to be successful and inclusive

    Speakers: Greg Borowski of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Lawan Hamilton of Scripps Washington Bureau; Amy Pyle of USA TODAY Network; George Papajohn of Chicago Tribune

    *Moderated by Amy Pyle, The Center for Investigative Reporting

    Three news pros discuss the advantages of teamwork in investigative reporting. Topics will include various approaches to building investigative teams, both permanent I-teams and temporary SWAT-style teams, and panelists will detail their inside secrets for avoiding exclusivity and jealousy. Discussion also will center on how to get the benefits of a team when one is not possible, including in smaller news operations, by fostering collaboration and hiring for complementary skills.

    Salon 1-3

    2:40 pm - 3:40 pm

  • Hands-on

    Pivot tables for stories (repeat)

    Speaker: Denise Malan of IRE and NICAR

    A look at the awesome power of pivot - and how to use it to analyze your dataset in minutes rather than hours.
    This session will be most helpful if: You are familiar with formulas in Excel or another spreadsheet program.

    Nob Hill C

    2:40 pm - 3:40 pm

  • Hands-on

    Stop drowning in data. Start making sense! (part 2)

    Speaker: Peter Aldhous of BuzzFeed News

    Using a free Firefox add-on, and some simple code that anyone can understand (it's practically plain English), we'll learn how to "interview" sprawling datasets to find strong reporting leads, using data from this story. (Or in geek-speak: An introduction to SQLite databases.)

    We’ll also go over how to create a data table and import your data into into it. We'll ask questions involving dates, and discover how to do some simple math. Then we'll learn why databases are powerful tools for enterprise reporting, by running join queries on two datasets that were not designed to meet. As time permits, we'll learn the difference between INNER JOIN and LEFT JOIN, and other SQL tricks.

    Nob Hill D

    2:40 pm - 3:40 pm

  • Panel

    The art of storytelling: Danger from above

    Speaker: Louise Kiernan of ProPublica Illinois

    Pulitzer winner Louise Kiernan will take the audience inside her two-part narrative project “Danger from Above” as part of our “master class” series.  These special panels are designed to dig in deep into narrative arc, structure and character development.
    If you plan to attend this panel, please read the following stories in advance. We’d like attendees to be familiar with the project, which should lead to a more robust discussion of the story-telling choices.

    Danger from above - Part 1

    Danger from above - Part 2

    Salon 10-11

    2:40 pm - 3:40 pm

  • Hands-on

    Crack PDFs with Tabula

    Speaker: Mike Tigas of ProPublica

    Ever receive a FOIA response that has all the data you want -- but in PDF files? Ever try accessing that data in Excel or database software? You can do it with Tabula. We'll show you how. Tabula is a tool to extract data tables from PDF files. It’s free, open source, built by journalists and doesn't send your sensitive data over the internet. At this hands-on workshop, we'll teach you how to use it with real world examples -- or, if you bring your own PDFs, we'll show you how to liberate the data. (Tabula doesn't work with scanned or OCRed PDFs -- only PDFs with embedded text. That is, if you can select text on the PDF, Tabula will work.)

    Bring your laptop (Mac, PC or even Linux) and we'll help you install it, too, of course.

     

    Nob Hill C

    3:50 pm - 4:35 pm

  • Panel

    Deep dive: Audio storytelling

    Speakers: Daniel Velasco of Swedish Radio; Susanne Reber of Scripps Washington Bureau

    Audio is a powerful way to tell your investigative story. Radio audiences are holding and podcast popularity is growing. So how do you get the most out of your investigation to make your audio stories compelling and memorable? Daniel Velasco and Susanne Reber, two award winning radio investigative journalists take you through tips that unleash the power of narrative in the audio medium.

    Salon 4-6

    3:50 pm - 4:35 pm

  • Panel

    Deep dive: Broadcast

    Speakers: Keli Rabon of independent journalist; Ira Rosen of 60 Minutes; Tisha Thompson of ESPN; Rick Yarborough of NBC4 Washington

    An in-depth look at some of the biggest broadcast stories of the year. Reporters and producers showcase how they got the story and successfully executed it. Learn tips and strategies to make a strong and compelling broadcast investigation.

    Golden Gate B

    3:50 pm - 4:35 pm

  • Panel

    Deep dive: Charting the course to an investigative newsroom

    Speaker: Gary Dotson of Belleville News-Democrat

    Would you like to do more investigative reporting in your newsroom but don't know how to pull it off? Have budget cuts, staff downsizing and increased digital demands stretched your resources to the point where it seems there's no time to do investigative reporting? This session will examine the Watchdog Model, which outlines simple steps any reporter or editor can use to stay focused and create an investigative culture in the newsroom.

    Salon 1-3

    3:50 pm - 4:35 pm

  • Panel

    Deep dive: Design thinking for journalists

    Speakers: Marie Gilot; Heather Chaplin of The New School

    Design thinking is a process that helps create successful consumer products –bicycle seats that fit right, instinctive ATM interfaces, safer hospital protocols.  What if we used design thinking to craft news stories and news apps that people need, want and use? What if we could enable a generation of journalists who are flexible and creative? Marie Gilot, former newspaper reporter and now program associate at the Knight Foundation and Heather Chaplin, director of the Journalism + Design program at The New School, who covered video games for more than a decade, will explore what it means to apply design thinking to journalism and journalism education, as well as the tensions that exist between the journalism and design worlds.

    Salon 12-13

    3:50 pm - 4:35 pm

  • Panel

    Deep dive: Investigating economic disparities

    Speaker: David Cay Johnston of DCReport

    Inequality, the defining issue of our time, is a subtle and complex issue. It is not, for example, synonymous with poverty. And it is about much more than just dollars. Health care, environmental hazards, wage theft, incarceration and access to the requisite tools for success all play a role. Learn where to find data, ways to think about the issues and how to engage audiences.

    Salon 8

    3:50 pm - 4:35 pm

  • Panel

    Deep dive: Mobile-first journalism, making big stories work on small screens

    Speaker: David Ho of The Wall Street Journal

    Smart phones and tablets are rising fast to become the dominant digital platforms for news and information. In this deep dive, speak with a leading mobile journalism expert on how you can think "mobile first" and ensure your stories work - and win - with these vast mobile audiences.

    Salon 7

    3:50 pm - 4:35 pm

  • Panel

    Deep dive: Student investigations

    Speakers: Alec Klein of The Medill Justice Project; Ryan Lovelace of The National Law Journal; Loni Smith McKown of Butler University; Christina Assi of The Medill Justice Project; Kristin Gilger of Arizona State University

    IRE student journalism winners from Butler University and Northwestern University talk about their investigations and the impact that followed their work, from revelations that a visiting  professor named to head the new nonprofit Desmond Tutu Center at Butler University, had previously misused funds at a nonprofit he managed in South Africa, to Medill's creation of the largest publicly available national database on shaken-baby syndrome and the impact on the criminal justice system. A look inside today’s journalism schools and their groundbreaking work.

    Salon 10-11

    3:50 pm - 4:35 pm

  • Demo

    Deep dive: Tracking money in politics with MapLight (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Jay Costa; Daniel Newman of MapLight

    MapLight is a nonpartisan research organization tracking money's influence on politics. Their data and tools bring together campaign money, lawmaker's votes, and more, to connect the dots on political influence. This session includes both the overview and specifics of MapLight's current tools, and what's coming next. Includes plenty of time for Q&A and discussion, tailored to the audience.

    Nob Hill AB

    3:50 pm - 4:35 pm

  • Hands-on

    Getting data into Excel

    Speaker: Joe Yerardi of The Center for Public Integrity

    Don't let hard-to-use data ruin your day. Learn how to import a variety of formats (such as text files, HTML tables, PDFs) into Excel.
    This session will be most useful if: You are familiar with Excel or another spreadsheet program.

    Nob Hill D

    3:50 pm - 4:35 pm

  • Demo

    Backgrounding strategies (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Roseann Moring of Omaha World-Herald

    Build up your backgrounding toolkit with new resources and ideas for finding people and uncovering what they are about. We'll cover everything from mining social media and finding birth dates to tracking a family's criminal history.

    Nob Hill AB

    4:45 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Consumer investigations

    Speakers: Kurtis Ming of KOVR/CBS13 Sacramento; Tanya Rivera of WFMY-Greensboro; Lea Thompson of independent journalist; Julie Watts of KPIX-San Francisco

    *Moderated by Lea Thompson, LT Productions

    Stories on health, safety, environment and consumer goods and services have enormous impact that can make a difference anywhere.  Whether you need quick hits, or you have to boil down 6 months of work into 2 ½ minutes this panel has 90 minutes to give you hundreds of ideas and tips on how to get it done with substance and style. This panel is also good for anyone who needs video for the web.

    Golden Gate B

    4:45 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Data makeover: Make dirty data usable with Excel functions

    Speaker: MaryJo Webster of Star Tribune

    Data we get from public records requests or even posted online is often structured in a way that doesn't make it easy to analyze.  We'll use real data examples to show you various ways to easily tackle some of the more common problems, using Excel functions, some basic Excel tools you might not know about and a useful add-in tool.

    Nob Hill C

    4:45 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Panel

    Finding stories in Medicare’s vast data trove (Sponsored by Association of Health Care Journalists)

    Speakers: David Donald of Investigative Reporting Workshop-American University; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Charles Ornstein of ProPublica; John Carreyrou of The Wall Street Journal

    In the past couple years, Medicare has released several massive data sets that are transforming the way that journalists cover health care. These data sets detail the payments that providers have received from Medicare, the prescriptions written by them and information about their referral networks. Later this year, the government will release data on payments from drug and medical device companies to doctors. Come to this session for information on how to use these data sets and important context to keep in mind.

    Salon 4-6

    4:45 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Panel

    Follow the money: Tracking fraud, waste and mismanagement (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Will Evans of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Andrew McIntosh of Puget Sound Business Journal; Charles Piller of Science Magazine; David Evans of Bloomberg News

    *Moderated by David Evans, Bloomberg Markets Magazine

    Did you cross the SF-Oakland Bay Bridge en route to this conference? Congratulations on your safe arrival. We'll learn about an investigation of shoddy construction and problematic safety testing. You might reconsider your route home. We’ll also cover probing fraud, lavish spending and lax management at a Montreal tourist attraction, and taxpayer-funded rehab clinics in California that falsified documents and bribed clients.

    Salon 1-3

    4:45 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Panel

    From the newsroom to the classroom

    Speakers: Nate Carlisle of The Salt Lake Tribune; Cheryl W. Thompson of NPR; Duff Wilson of Reuters; Bill Buzenberg of The Center for Public Integrity

    *Moderated by Bill Buzenberg, The Center for Public Integrity

    More and more journalists are combining teaching and journalism in some form. We’ve found some interesting models to demonstrate how this can be done, either full-time or part-time, in order to capture the best of both worlds. Learn about the triumphs and challenges of juggling teaching and investigative reporting from three journalists who have been successful at making this transition.

    Salon 10-11

    4:45 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Google Fusion for beginners

    Speaker: Niels Heimeriks of WPTV/NewsChannel5 West Palm Beach

    At the end of this session attendees will be able to use Excel to prepare a data set for mapping, and they will be able to map the data set as points on a map (including pop up boxes, different types of markers, how to include pictures etc).

    Nob Hill D

    4:45 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Panel

    SHOWCASE PANEL They're watching you: Investigating the surveillance society and protecting your work from prying eyes

    Speakers: Jill Abramson of Advisory board of ProPublica; Geoffrey King of Committee to Protect Journalists; Dominic Rushe of The Guardian; Trevor Timm of Freedom of the Press Foundation; Leonard Downie of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    *Moderated by Leonard Downie, Jr, ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    How did The Guardian, The Washington Post and The New York Times explore the NSA revelations and investigate other government and commercial surveillance? How did they deal with the U. S. and British governments? How did their journalists safeguard their work from digital intrusion? Are other investigative journalists vulnerable to surveillance – even from local cops? What can they do about it? Leading editors, reporters and press freedom advocates describe how to do accountability journalism in a surveillance society.

    Salon 8

    4:45 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Panel

    When data don't exist

    Speakers: Robert Benincasa of NPR; Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Daniel Lathrop of University of Iowa

    You've got a great story idea but no one tracks the data. Time to quit, right? Wrong. We'll show you the tools, and the pitfalls, of making your own data when no data exists.

    Salon 12-13

    4:45 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Conference Registration (Saturday)

    Registration will be located on lower B2 level of the San Francisco Marriott Marquis.

    Lower B2 Level

    8:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Saturday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.

    Lower B2 Level

    8:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Panel

    Free the data

    Speakers: Coulter Jones of The Wall Street Journal; Kirsten Mitchell of Office of Government Information Services (OGIS); Serdar Tumgoren of Stanford University; Deborah Nelson of University of Maryland

    *Moderated by Deborah Nelson, University of Maryland

    Learn the latest on the current state of open records, tactics that can successfully get you what you're after, and what can happen when government pushes back.

    Salon 4-6

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Panel

    Getting lucky: Uncovering those gaming the system (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Mark Arsenault of The Boston Globe; Lawrence Mower of Tampa Bay Times; Robert Cribb of Toronto Star; Kate O'Keeffe of The Wall Street Journal

    *Moderated by Robert Cribb, Toronto Star

    Investigating conspicuous coincidences and hidden influences when big money changes hands relies on deep data and document digs. And lots of coffee. Three top journalists take us behind the curtain on stories that exposed fraudulent lottery wins, political ties in a massive land deal and the hidden art of collecting debt from casino gamblers.

    Golden Gate B

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Hands-on

    Getting started with Excel (repeat)

    Speaker: Brad Branan of The Sacramento Bee

    In this introduction to spreadsheets you'll begin analyzing data with Excel, a simple but powerful tool. You'll learn how to enter data, sort it and conduct simple calculations like average and median. Time allowing, you’ll even learn to create a basic visualization of your data.

    Nob Hill D

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Demo

    How to find stories in government contracting data (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Danielle Ivory of The New York Times

    The government spends billions of dollars each year at the federal, state and local level, but it can be tricky to follow the money. This will be a crash course in how to navigate the free websites that collect these records and find stories that may be hiding in plain sight.

    Nob Hill AB

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Hands-on

    Mapping 1: Creating simple desktop maps with GIS software *pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: David Herzog of IRE and NICAR

    In this introductory class attendees will learn how to display data geographically with ArcGIS.

    This is the first in a series of three classes. Those who attend all three sessions will receive a free copy of ArcGIS Desktop (PC only) from Esri. Preregistration is required as seating is limited. Sign up at the conference registration from 1:30 - 6 p.m. Friday, June 27. Email jaimi@ire.org with questions.

    Nob Hill C

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Panel

    Measuring impact: Determining whether your stories make a difference

    Speakers: Lindsay Green-Barber of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Lorie Hearn of inewsource; Keith Hammonds of Solutions Journalism Network

    *Moderated by Lorie Hearn, inewsource

    Changing a law. Triggering an investigation. Spurring a protest. Informing a citizen. As investigative journalists, we gauge the importance of our stories by their real world results. But how can we measure these results?  This panel will share new strategies and tools for proving your work really matters.

    Salon 10-11

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Panel

    Measuring mental health care in your community

    Speakers: Meg Kissinger of Columbia University; Michael Rey of CBS News 60 Minutes; Oriana Zill de Granados of CBS News 60 Minutes; Brian Rosenthal of The New York Times

    From Sandy Hook Elementary to UC-Santa Barbara and beyond... News today is filled with stories about people suffering from mental illness and potential links to mass shootings. How can you responsibly report on these events? We'll show you how we have tried to shine a light on these poorly understood illnesses. Learn how to gauge the shortcomings of the current system of treatment. Find out how you can measure what your community is doing about it.    

    Club Room

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Panel

    No magic bullet: How to track and report on America's gun violence epidemic

    Speakers: Patricia Carbajales of Stanford University; Mark Follman of Mother Jones; Trymaine Lee of MSNBC; Emily Bell of Columbia Journalism School

    *Moderated by Emily Bell, Columbia Journalism School

     From Aurora to Sandy Hook to Fort Hood (again), a spate of mass shootings has gripped our attention and fueled a fierce national debate about guns. But there's been a critical problem: Good data on these types of events—and on gun violence more broadly—has been hard to come by, in part due to the suppression of federal research. In the last two years, journalists have worked to fill this void, scouring news reports and combing through limited federal, state, and local government records on guns and gun violence. Several news organizations have built their own data projects documenting mass shootings and gun deaths, and produced quality narrative reporting using them. Yet without an agreed-upon methodology for compiling and analyzing such complex, incomplete data sets, the findings of these investigations have varied. This panel will bring together journalists behind these investigations, and others who have reported on gun violence in notable ways, for a conversation about how to cover this crucial subject matter. Can a set of best practices be determined for gathering gun data, or is there value in having disparate approaches? What data is most important to include? Why has it been so hard to access such information in the past, and what key research has yet to be done? All of this and more will be on the table.

    Salon 12-13

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Panel

    Quick-turn stories in emerging communities (Sponsored by Asian American Journalists Association)

    Speakers: Momo Chang of independent journalist; Ravi Kapur of WRJK-Chicago; Molly Hennessy-Fiske of Los Angeles Times; David Boardman of Temple University

    *Moderated by David Boardman, Temple University

    Many journalists face pressure to produce quick-turn enterprise stories, and the challenge is even greater when working in communities where a newsroom doesn't have strong ties. Hear from journalists who work in such communities and get insight on how to make those connections, and fine crucial information, to turn enterprise stories quickly.

    Salon 1-3

    8:30 am - 9:30 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: More personality

    Speakers: Russ Ptacek of independent journalist; Gerry Wagschal of ABC News; Jeremy Jojola of KUSA/9News Denver

    Keep your audience’s attention, increase your investigation’s impact, and grow your social media footprint by exposing the reporter telling the story.

    Network and large market panelists explore the use of reporter personality in investigative reporting.

    Golden Gate B

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Campus coverage: Sexual assault and other crimes on campus (Sponsored by Lumina Foundation)

    Speakers: Walt Bogdanich of The New York Times; David Donald of Investigative Reporting Workshop-American University; Samantha Sunne of independent journalist; Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV

    *Moderated by Jill Riepenhoff, The Columbus Dispatch

    From Florida State to the University of Oregon to thousands of campuses in between, sexual assault is a widely discussed topic on campus. Learn how to make sense of baffling crime statistics and where to look for documents that really explain how your campus handles these crimes. And learn how to point out the woeful failures of some police and university officials.

    Salon 1-3

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Finding needles in a social media haystack

    Speaker: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR

    Social media can be a giant haystack of information and people: some helpful but much of it worthless or inaccurate. In this session, you'll learn how to dig through that giant pile to find golden needles for your stories, the tactics and tricks of advanced searches in Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram, and you’ll discover the power of geolocation, to find social media information and sources in a specific place. You'll also see how a free dashboard (HootSuite) can help you monitor social media regularly.

    Salon 10-11

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Hands-on

    Formulas for stories in Excel (repeat)

    Speaker: Meghan Hoyer of The Associated Press

    Much of Excel's power comes in the form of formulas. In this class you'll learn how to use them to analyze data with the eye of a journalist. Yes, math will be involved, but it's totally worth it! This class will show you how calculations like change, percent change, rates and ratios can beef up your reporting.

    Nob Hill D

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Introduction to multimedia immigration storytelling and U.S. Census data

    Speaker: Zita Arocha of University of Texas - El Paso

    This series of  special sessions focuses on resources for reporting and writing effective immigration stories, including how to mine documents and statistics in the U.S. and other countries to report on immigration trends, problems and to unearth untold stories. The afternoon sessions are hands on and focus on using a specific immigration data set to create maps/visualizations. 

    This session is part of a series focusing on immigration. Two afternoon sessions, Analyzing Immigration Data Parts 1 and 2, follow the morning sessions; sign up will be available during this session.

    Sponsored by the McCormick Foundation.

    Salon 12-13

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Managers track: Building and protecting the watchdog brand

    Speakers: Jonathan Mitchell of NBC Bay Area; George Stanley of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Joyce Terhaar of The Sacramento Bee; Manny Garcia of USA TODAY Network

    *Moderated by Manny Garcia, Naples Daily News

    Three award-winning newsroom leaders provide practical advice – and take your questions – on how to deliver greater investigative stories and protect your franchise at a time when news operations face disruptions and other competitive challenges. Among the topics:  growing your I-team, identifying the project with impact, producing it across platforms and creating a culture of newsroom collaboration. Panelists are: Joyce Terhaar, Executive Editor Sacramento Bee; George Stanley, Managing Editor, The Milwaukee Sentinel and Jonathan Mitchell, Vice President of News at NBC Bay Area.

    Salon 4-6

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Hands-on

    Mapping 2: Importing and overlaying data with GIS software *pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    This is the second in a series of three classes. Those who attend all three sessions will receive a free copy of ArcGIS Desktop (PC only) from Esri. Preregistration is required as seating is limited. Sign up at the conference registration from 1:30 - 6 p.m. Friday, June 27. Email jaimi@ire.org with questions.

    Nob Hill C

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    The art of storytelling: Deadly neglect

    Speaker: Sam Roe of Chicago Tribune

    Sam Roe, a Pulitzer Prize winner and three-time Pulitzer finalist, shows how to identify the narrative in an investigation, how to flesh it out with reporting and writing, and how to organize it to maximize impact and suspense. He’ll focus on “Deadly Neglect,” a story that started out as a run-of-the-mill nursing home project but gained power when Roe zeroed in on the agonizing ordeal of a 9-year-old boy.

    If you plan to attend this panel, please read the following story in advance. We’d like attendees to be familiar with the project, which should lead to a more robust discussion of the story-telling choices.

    Deadly neglect

    Club Room

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Demo

    Tracking campaign finance

    Presented by the Center for Responsive Politics and the Institute for National Money in State Politics

    Learn how to use two free, online tools that allow you to dig in on campaign donations, from the state to the federal level: Opensecrets.org and Followthemoney.org. These sites will allow you to provide a whole new level to your election coverage.

    Nob Hill AB

    9:40 am - 10:40 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Interviewing

    Speakers: Jenna Susko of NBC4 Los Angeles; Scott Zamost of CNBC; Lee Zurik of WVUE-New Orleans

    From the network to the local newsroom, discover the art of the broadcast interview.  Learn techniques for preparation and execution so you can get the most out of scheduled and unscheduled interviews. You’ll get tips and strategies for handling tough situations in this session.

    Golden Gate B

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Panel

    Investigating in a small town (Sponsored by Texas Center for Community Journalism)

    Speakers: Tim Crews of Sacramento Valley Mirror; Kathy Cruz of Hood County News; Samantha Swindler of The Oregonian/OregonLive; Tommy Thomason of Texas Center for Community Journalism

    *Moderated by Tommy Thomason, Texas Center for Community Journalism

    How do you conduct investigations when you have limited funds and an already-overworked small staff of reporters?  This panel will show that it can be done – and how.  Some of America’s best-known community journalists -- one has been featured on 60 Minutes and all have won awards in their states for investigative reporting – will share their stories and the price they had to pay for pursuing important investigations.

    Salon 4-6

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Demo

    Learn how to set up Off the Record chat (OTR), the easiest way to use encryption (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Garrett Robinson of Freedom of the Press Foundation; Yan Zhu of Electronic Frontier Foundation

    In the age of NSA mass surveillance, protecting your communications with sources is now more important than ever. Bring your laptop to this hands-on session, learn how encryption works, and then get a tutorial on how set up OTR chat with the help of experts, so you can keep your future sources safe.

    Nob Hill AB

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Panel

    Managers track: Placing your bets - Choosing the right stories

    Speakers: Marc Duvoisin of Los Angeles Times; Stephen Engelberg of ProPublica; Evelyn Larrubia of independent journalist; Mark Katches of Tampa Bay Times

    *Moderated by Mark Katches, The Center for Investigative Reporting

    Editors from small and larger newsrooms discuss how they make the all-important decisions about which investigations to pursue. What’s the selection criteria for placing the winning bets? How does potential impact factor into the equation? And once you make the decisions to move forward, how do you navigate the twists and turns to produce the best work possible?

    Salon 1-3

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Mapping from the desktop to the web *pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Robby Deming of Esri

    Join us for a hands-on tutorial on using ArcGIS Online as a free tool to transform your desktop GIS research and other public data into interactive web maps and apps.

    This is the third in a series of three classes. Those who attend all three sessions will receive a free copy of ArcGIS Desktop (PC only) from Esri. Preregistration is required as seating is limited. Sign up at the conference registration from 1:30 - 6 p.m. Friday, June 27. Email jaimi@ire.org with questions.

    Nob Hill C

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Panel

    Mining immigration documents and statistics

    Speakers: Martha Mendoza of The Associated Press; Lise Olsen of Texas Observer

    Learn to unlock fascinating stories buried deep in visa statistics, human trafficking reports, court documents and other public records both in your backyard and worldwide.

    This session is part of a series focusing on immigration. Two afternoon sessions, Analyzing Immigration Data Parts 1 and 2, follow the morning sessions; sign up will be available during this session.

    Sponsored by the McCormick Foundation.

    Salon 12-13

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Panel

    On the beat: Healthcare

    Speakers: Christina Jewett of Kaiser Health News; Jennifer Levitz of The Wall Street Journal; Joseph Neff of The Marshall Project; Mark Rochester of Detroit Free Press

    *Moderated by Mark Rochester, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    In this session, learn how to develop strategies for building key sources on the health beat, gathering and maintaining useful data and tactics for routinely delivering watchdog reporting on the healthcare industry.

    Club Room

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Panel

    Spiked! When media managers can't handle the truth

    Speakers: Walt Bogdanich of The New York Times; Frank Koughan of Left/Right Documentaries; Martin Koughan of independent journalist; Charles Lewis of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    *Moderated by Charles Lewis, Investigative Reporting Workshop

    Internal media censorship has always been the bane of investigative reporters' existence everywhere and this problem has certainly not improved in the past 20 years. Four veterans will recount their own close encounters of the worst kind, their stories being spiked, and explore the broader implications of this occupational hazard.

    Salon 10-11

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Under pressure: Real life in real time with breaking news

    Speaker: Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area

    What do you do when a bridge collapses, a plane crashes, oil spills or a building explodes? In this session you'll walk through a real-life breaking news scenario tackling it as an investigator. We’ll let you try it on your own then we’ll walk you through some resources you might not have known existed. Beat your competition with these tips and sources. Be ready to participate in real time, actual breaking news simulation!

    Nob Hill D

    10:50 am - 11:50 am

  • Awards Luncheon

    IRE Awards Luncheon featuring keynote speaker Lowell Bergman of UC Berkeley’s Investigative Reporting Program

    A highlight of the IRE conference, the IRE Awards Luncheon begins at noon Saturday in Salon 7,8,9. We will present the 2013 IRE Awards and salute some of the best investigative work of the past year.  

    Admission to the luncheon is included with your conference registration.  Guest tickets can be purchased for $60. Purchase additional guest tickets.  Guest tickets will be available for pick-up at the IRE Sales Table on the Lower B2 Level of the San Francisco Marriott Marquis beginning Wednesday, June 25 at 3 p.m.

    Salon 7,8,9

    12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Analyzing immigration data 1

    Speaker: Claudia Nunez of Hoy Los Angeles

    Mapping Boot Camp on how to use open tools to create maps/visualizations for immigration stories that follow the morning session of Introduction to multimedia immigration storytelling and U.S. Census data

    This session is part of a series focusing on immigration. Pre-registered attendees will receive priority seating.  

    Sponsored by the McCormick Foundation.

     

    Nob Hill D

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Web collaborations

    Speakers: Sara Catania of University of Southern California - Annenberg, JSK Journalism Fellowships, Solutions Journalism Network; Joel Grover of NBC4 Los Angeles; Lee Ferran of ABC News; Russ Walker of ----0000 Institution Not Present 0000----

    You’ve got a killer investigation and you want the world to know. We’ll show you how partnering with your web/digital team can help develop sources, generate buzz and extend the life of your investigative stories long after they’ve aired.

    Golden Gate B

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Collaboration: Bringing students into your investigation

    Speakers: Andy Hall of Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism; Nick Penzenstadler of USA TODAY Network; Brant Houston of University of Illinois; Lauren Mills of The Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism

    *Moderated by Brant Houston, University of Illinois

    This panel will look at the best ways to include students in investigations, what the expectations should be for the editors, reporters and students, and how to ensure students fully participate while avoiding errors and too much time spent on training.

    Salon 4-6

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Managers track: Collaboration dreams & nightmares - How to sleep soundly when dealing with partners

    Speakers: Raney Aronson-Rath of FRONTLINE; Michelle Holmes of AL.com; Jim Brady of Billy Penn; Robin Fields of ProPublica

    *Moderated by Robin Fields, ProPublica

    Collaboration was once a rarity in investigations, an area known more for shark-like competition. Today, however, partnerships are multiplying. The best of them yield deeper, better journalism that resonates across multiple platforms. The worst can make the already hard work of doing investigative stories even harder – and land you on Romenesko. Our speakers tell you how to grab the glories and anticipate (and, we hope, avoid!) the pitfalls.

    Salon 1-3

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    On the beat: Law enforcement

    Speakers: Frances Robles of The New York Times; Jodi Upton of Syracuse University; Jaxon Van Derbeken of San Francisco Chronicle; John Diedrich of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    *Moderated by John Diedrich, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Covering law enforcement isn’t just for newbies. Veteran reporters know investigations lurk everywhere on this target-rich beat. This pragmatic panel will provide tips and strategies, such as how to find records and sources in surprising places; scrutinize often-unquestioned crime data; turn a breaking story into an investigation; use cop beat tips and tactics to find other stories; and uncover misconduct, from local cops to federal agents.

    Salon 10-11

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Story-based inquiry (part 1)

    Speakers: Luuk Sengers of Story-Based Inquiry Associates; Mark Lee Hunter of Story-Based Inquiry Associates

    Using a free Firefox add-on, and some simple code that anyone can understand (it's practically plain English), we'll learn how to "interview" sprawling datasets to find strong reporting leads, using data from this story. (Or in geek-speak: An introduction to SQLite databases.)

    The separate steps of investigative reporting can be integrated into a single process, with tremendous gains in time, accuracy and confidence. We begin by forming an investigative hypothesis. Then, we deconstruct the hypothesis to find paths for verification. Two further tools illuminate the paths: a source map and a timeline. By using them together, we anticipate where to find key human sources and records. We also structure the story as we verify it.

    Salon 12-13

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    The art of storytelling: Building chemistry

    Speakers: John Hillkirk of Kaiser Health News; Alison Young of Missouri School of Journalism; Alexandra Zayas of ProPublica; Chris Davis of USA TODAY Network

    When it comes to investigative projects, storytelling too often takes a back seat to reporting. In this session, two reporter-editor teams will discuss how they worked through the conceptualizing and writing of two recent investigations: In God’s Name (tampabay.com/faccca) and Supplement Shell Game (supplements.usatoday.com). They’ll share tips for better collaborative storytelling, techniques for sharpening writing, approaches to storytelling on multiple platforms and building a positive reporter/editor relationship.

    Club Room

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Turn your addresses into mappable points

    Speakers: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News; Denise Malan of IRE and NICAR

    Have you ever received data that included addresses? In this session we'll talk about when it helps to display those addresses on a map, show you how to do it using free services and discuss checking for accuracy and avoiding potential traps and pitfalls.

    Nob Hill C

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Demo

    Using Twitter data to tell stories (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Simon Rogers of Twitter; Scott Hendrickson of Twitter

    With the millions of tweets being sent on Twitter everyday, the platform can help tell stories on a grander scale. Learn the ways news organizations are using Twitter data to find and share news stories and how you can get started right now.

    Nob Hill AB

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Analyzing immigration data 2

    Speaker: Claudia Nunez of Hoy Los Angeles

    Mapping Boot Camp on how to use open tools to create maps/visualizations for immigration stories that follow the morning session of Introduction to multimedia immigration storytelling and U.S. Census data

    This session is part of a series focusing on immigration. Pre-registered attendees will receive priority seating.  

    Sponsored by the McCormick Foundation.

    Nob Hill D

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Breaking news

    Speakers: Andrew Blankstein of NBC News; Jodie Fleischer of NBC4 Washington; Brett Shipp of WFAA-Dallas/Fort Worth

    When big news breaks and the bosses ask you to lend your investigative expertise, how do you respond?  Leave the “what is happening” to the on-air people. The investigator’s role is to dive head-first into “How did this happen”? “Where else might this happen again”?  “How do we keep this from happening again”? This panel of veteran investigators will show real world examples of how they were able to contribute on a big story and why tragedy demands action, answers and results. You’ll also learn how to be a resource for the rest of the newsroom and uncover quick facts that will add depth to the breaking story (and details your competitors won't have). 

    Golden Gate B

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Hands-on

    Everyday scripting

    Speaker: Agustin Armendariz of The New York Times

    There are everyday data munging tasks that you can automate with just a little bit of programming know-how. This class is geared towards more seasoned data analysts. Those that know how to use things like functions and stored procedures to process data. But beginners are welcome. We'll use python and the Ipython Notebook to roll through some code and I'll have other example scripts posted on Github for reference when you get ready to apply these techniques in your everyday work. So stop by, have some fun and get ready to work more accurately and efficiently.

    This session will be most useful if: You have some data experience including functions and store procedures to process data, but beginners are welcome.

    Nob Hill C

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Friendly fire: Investigating do-gooders and crowd-pleasers

    Speakers: Melanie Payne of USA TODAY Network; Megan Twohey of Reuters; Sara Ganim of CNN; Bobby Calvan of The Associated Press; Mc Nelly Torres of independent journalist

    What happens when a reporter investigates a beloved institution, a popular non-profit or a group of do-gooders? How does the community – both real and virtual – respond?

    Edgar A. Poe award winner Megan Twohey and Pulitzer Prize winner Sarah Ganim will talk about the pressures, difficulties and rewards of investigating sacred cows. Among the topics:  How to find and report these stories, what to expect after you publish and how to deal with personal and professional attacks.

    Salon 1-3

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating organized crime

    Speakers: Jesus Ibarra of Periódico Expreso; Stevan Dojcinovic of Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project; Drew Sullivan of Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project; David Kaplan of Global Investigative Journalism Network

    *Moderated by David Kaplan, Global Investigative Journalism Network

    It ain’t your father’s Mob. In the 21st Century, organized crime is networked, globalized, cyber-savvy, and able to move money, people, and contraband across borders with impunity. No wonder crime syndicates are dancing circles around law enforcement and the media. Here’s a look at how to investigate cartels, rogue states, and criminal enterprises around the world – from a panel with decades of experience in going after them.

    Salon 10-11

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating powerful institutions, inside & out

    Speakers: Matt Apuzzo of The New York Times; Ross Garber of Shipman & Goodwin LLP; James Grimaldi of The Wall Street Journal

    *Moderated by James Grimaldi, The Wall Street Journal

    Get real-world tips on how to investigate powerful institutions from a white-collar defense lawyer who has seen it from the inside, and two reporters who have done it from the outside. Where are the access points when companies and politicians circle the wagons? Where are the useful documents and sources hidden? How do you get past "no comment" once lawyers and flacks get involved? And how do you bullet-proof stories and prepare for the pushback?

    Salon 4-6

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Demo

    Learn how to set up PGP email encryption (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Garrett Robinson of Freedom of the Press Foundation; Yan Zhu of Electronic Frontier Foundation

    It's the type of encryption Edward Snowden first used to contact Glenn Greenwald. And it's the type of knowledge every journalist should know, but few have. Bring your laptop to this hands-on session, learn how PGP email encryption works, and then get a tutorial on how set up it up with the help of experts, so you can keep your future sources safe. 

    Nob Hill AB

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Lessons from the field (and off): Covering the NFL and its intersection with local governments

    Speakers: Liam Dillon of Los Angeles Times; Brent Schrotenboer; Don Van Natta Jr. of ESPN; Steve Fainaru of ESPN

    *Moderated by Steve Fainaru, ESPN

    The National Football League administers the richest, most popular sport in America. Its power and reach gives it enormous influence over local governments, public health issues and the media. With the NFL embroiled in litigation over its handling of football-related concussions and thousands of parents forcing their kids to abandon the sport over health concerns, this panel explores how to cover this highly secretive organization on issues ranging from stadium financing to off-the field violence and examines the sources of the NFL's power.

    Club Room

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Panel

    Story-based inquiry (part 2)

    Speakers: Mark Lee Hunter of Story-Based Inquiry Associates; Luuk Sengers of Story-Based Inquiry Associates

    Using a free Firefox add-on, and some simple code that anyone can understand (it's practically plain English), we'll learn how to "interview" sprawling datasets to find strong reporting leads, using data from this story. (Or in geek-speak: An introduction to SQLite databases.)

    Investigation generates more material than news reporting – so you have to organize it as you proceed, or lose the value of your work. We will show you how to create a database from your research, and then how to shape this database into a narrative structure. These processes make your work more efficient, and your product more accurate. Then, we discuss specific techniques to manage the momentum and impact of the narrative.

     

    Salon 12-13

    3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

  • Hands-on

    IRE by design (hands-on)

    **Updated to reflect IRE by Design panel information**

    Web scraping made easier with Helium: Grab data from the web without being bogged down with coding. Helium can help make web-scraping less messy for us all. But you can only learn by doing. That's why this is a hands-on offering. We reprise the IRE staff presentation of early Friday morning.

    Local Public Employee Salaries - Requesting and analyzing public payroll: Employee costs are often the largest portion of the expenses of any public agency, but it's also often very difficult to obtain and analyze. Well we've been collecting public employee salary and benefit data in California, from the state down to tiny cemetery districts, since 2008 and we will tell you our secrets. Who gets deferred compensation? Who doesn't pay into their own pensions? What part time workers and officials get full-time level health benefits? We will give you the rundown on the new edition, just live on Friday, of our Public Employee Salary Database as well as our new story on excessive overtime. Who's the $420,000 fire fighter? How did a cop manage to get 2,400 hours of overtime in one year?

    Nob Hill C & D

    4:40 pm - 5:40 pm

  • Panel

    IRE by design: Help shape FOIA reform & join the #FOIAFriday community

    **Updated to reflect IRE by Design panel information**

    What can be done to strengthen the Freedom of Information Act?

    We have a chance to set the agenda of the newly formed FOIA Modernization Advisory Committee. The group, which met for the first time this week, includes one of our own: IRE member Andrew Becker. We are working together to solicit and collect as much input on the administration of FOIA as possible. The goal: To boost the influence journalists have on the committee, chiefly composed of government employees.

    The committee is the most significant conduit for change to open records laws since the FOIA was enacted in 1966. It’s mission is to “improve the administration of the law.” The agency that oversees this group, the Office of Government Information Services (OGIS), works to help requesters like you solve FOIA-related issues. A representative of OGIS is aware of our efforts and will be at the conference with her notebook ready.

    Are fees your biggest roadblock to information? Blanket redactions? Response time? Something else? Let’s decide together.

    Join us this Saturday, June 28 at 4:50 pm to be a part of the discussion. Don't let reform happen without you. Steering the committee’s direction isn’t all we’re doing.

    This is also a chance for you to join the growing #FOIAFriday community. More than a hashtag, #FOIAFriday is a space to share tips, ask for advice and coordinate efforts to improve access to public information.

    From New York’s Freedom of Information Law (FOIL) to California’s Public Records Act (CPRA) and everything in between, we’ve got you covered.

    Leading the discussion Saturday will be journalists Ellen Gabler and Djordje Padejski, and attorney Duffy Carolan. Gabler’s award-winning story for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on deadly delays in newborn screening programs drew heavily from data obtained via records requests filed around the country. Padejski founded FOIA Machine, an online platform that automates FOIA requests and helps journalists keep track of documents. Carolan is a lawyer with extensive experience representing journalists seeking information via state and federal open records laws. All will share tips from their experience obtaining, litigating and fighting for public records.

    Salon 1-3

    4:40 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    Deep dives 2: Broadcast

    Speakers: Michael Deeson of WTSP-Tampa Bay; Scott Friedman of KXAS/NBC5 Dallas-Fort Worth; Eva Parks of KXAS/NBC5 Dallas-Fort Worth; Wendy Halloran of independent journalist

    Digging deeper into investigations not only means finding the documents you need, but also finding and getting great sound from the target of your investigation, even if that person doesn’t want to talk to you.
     
    In this session, we will explain how to prepare for the potentially confrontational interview; techniques to convince your subject to sit down and explain his or her side of the story; and what do if the subject refuses to sit down and talk.
     
    Viewers expect our investigations to go beyond telling them about wrongdoing, but also showing and hearing from the person or persons responsible.
     
    There are concrete steps you can take to hold those responsible accountable. In addition, there are different preparations to make for a scheduled interview vs. an “unscheduled” interview.

    Golden Gate B

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Demo

    Investigative dashboard (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Paul Radu of Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project

    Your stories are international - your research should be too. That vital piece of evidence might be in another country, in another language, in a database you have never heard of before. The Investigative Dashboard helps you find it, both with databases and with personal help from skilled researchers. Come demo the Investigative Dashboard, a research tool of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project developed in collaboration with Google Ideas. 

    Try searching the crowd-sourced database, put together by dozens of reporters and civic hackers, which contains over 800,000 company registration records and other related public records from more than 11 countries; or explore more than 400 online databases in 120 jurisdictions where you can search for information on persons of interest and corporations worldwide. If you still cannot find what you need, submit a request to our professional researchers who can search external databases and official filings for evidence of corporate ownership or property holdings that cross borders. Take it for a test drive and it may lead you to that missing link in your investigation.

    Nob Hill AB

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    IRE by design: Managing your manager and wrangling your calendar

    **Updated to reflect IRE by Design panel information**

    Do you have great ideas but feel stymied by management? Are you brimming with great investigations but feel you don't have the time? I have a few tips on how to manage your manager and tame that calendar so you can get more work done. (There might also be tips for managers, not that I've been one.) This session is geared toward people who write anywhere from several stories per week to several per day. You know who you are.

    Salon 4-6

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    IRE by design: More investigative interview tips and tactics with Julian Sher

    **Updated to reflect IRE by Design panel information**

    When is the best time to trip the wire and request that tough accountability interview ? How do you prepare? How do you conduct yourself during a hard, at times uncomfortable interview? What to dare to do and what to avoid. In our Thursday morning session on Mastering The Investigative Interview, we saw lots of examples of great questions and painful mistakes, but we ran out of time and people had plenty of other issues to debate. So this is our chance to dig deeper. With Julian Sher, senior producer of Canada's premier investigative TV show The Fifth Estate and author of six investigative books.

    Salon 12-13

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    IRE by design: The freelance dilemma: How to get your investigative story made

    **Updated to reflect IRE by Design panel information**

    If you're a freelance journalist with a dynamite story idea, how do you know who you can trust with it and how much you should reveal? How do you pay to get the investigation off the ground and how do you indemnify yourself against law suits? If you're a commissioning editor, how much would you expect the freelancer to tip their hand and how much would they have to develop the story on their own dime? We'd like to get a good conversation going...freelancers and commissioning editors, come with your suggestions and success stories.

    Salon 10-11

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Panel

    IRE by design: Tilling the fields of agribusiness: You should do this. Here's why and how

    **Updated to reflect IRE by Design panel information**

    From food poisoning outbreaks to corporate food to environmental contamination to the rising issue of feeding 9 billion people by 2050 - agribusiness plays a role in much of our daily lives. Find out about the great stories not being covered. The session will offer keys to documents, human sources and data you can use. Join expert journalists from the Midest Center for Investigative Reporting, the Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism, Harvest Public Media and Kansas City Public Television, including Mike McGraw, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on the U.S. Department of Agriculture

    Club Room

    4:50 pm - 5:50 pm

  • Membership Meeting

    Salon 7

    6:00 pm - 7:15 pm

  • Special Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    7:30 pm - 7:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Closing reception

    Join us for a closing reception from 7:30 - 8:30 p.m. and enjoy one last evening of catching up with old and new friends, speakers and colleagues.  

    Hors d' oeuvres and a cash bar will be available. Conference name tags are required for entry.

    Salon 8

    7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

  • Membership Meeting

    Salon 7

    7:45 pm - 8:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Sunday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.

    Lower B2 Level

    8:30 am - 10:30 am

  • Hands-on

    DocumentCloud for stories

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Mark Horvit of University of Missouri

    With DocumentCloud, reporters can quickly organize and search hundreds (heck, thousands) of those pesky documents. Get hands-on experience in using this free tool to annotate, analyze and share key documents for your stories. This session is good for anyone.

    Nob Hill D

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Key documents you can't live without

    Speaker: Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    Move beyond anecdotes and he-said, she-said journalism with data and documents. Advice on developing a documents state of mind, navigating public records, understanding records retention schedules, exploring key records on a variety of beats, and becoming familiar with key data sets to produce high-impact local stories.

    Salon 12-13

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Open source tools for news

    Speakers: Adam Playford of Tampa Bay Times; Adam Schweigert of Institute for Nonprofit News

    Free tools built by journalists are becoming a huge part of powerful investigative reporting — both for small newsrooms trying to get off the ground and for any newsroom tackling major projects. Come learn what's available and how these tools can help you do better stories now.

    Salon 14-15

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Teaching investigative reporting: Tips and strategies

    Speakers: Fred Vallance-Jones of University of King's College; Deborah Nelson of University of Maryland; Mark Lee Hunter of Story-Based Inquiry Associates; Luuk Sengers of Story-Based Inquiry Associates; Brant Houston of University of Illinois; David Armstrong of Georgia News Lab

    *Moderated by Brant Houston, University of Illinois

    Some of the best teachers in investigative journalism will gather to share experiences, tips and strategies and discuss how to make sure students and professionals can get the most out of classes. Both in-person and online training will be discussed.

    Salon 10-11

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Career roundtable

    Speakers: Ziva Branstetter of The Washington Post; Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Andrew Donohue of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Ellen Gabler of The New York Times; Manny Garcia of USA TODAY Network; Duane Pohlman of Sinclair Broadcast Group; Mark Horvit of University of Missouri; Ramon Escobar of CNN

    *Moderated by Mark Horvit, IRE

    Looking for advice on how to take the next step in your career? Get practical tips from panelists who will talk about their own experiences and discuss what employers are looking for.

    Salon 10-11

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Hands-on

    Conquering common data analysis problems

    Speaker: Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    A hands on focus on the pitfalls of number crunching in Excel. We will highlight the problems and provide solutions in order to allow you to sleep soundly knowing your analysis is accurate.

    Nob Hill D

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Investigating inequity

    Speakers: Sally Lehrman of Markkula Center for Applied Ethics; Venise Wagner of San Francisco State University

    How do bus routes, traffic lights and barren streets build inequity into society? In this session we will show how to explore unequal outcomes in schools, health and criminal justice from a more complex and revealing vantage point. Participants will learn new reporting strategies to investigate how public policy and institutions shape unequal outcomes for different groups in society. You'll also learn new tools and techniques to help you accurately and fairly report on the factors at play in stories about disparity.

    Salon 14-15

    10:10 am - 11:10 am

  • Panel

    Web tools, tips and tricks for investigations

    Speaker: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters

    What reporters and editors need to know. From better search techniques to the invisible Web, how to find documents and databases on deadline and where to find reliable websites for enterprise stories. The craft of better searching and not wasting time. Handling issues of credibility and ethics online.

    Salon 12-13

    10:10 am - 11:10 am