Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "collaboration" ...

  • Affiliate Investigative Collaborations: Sky Rage and New Home Heartbreak

    This entry is to put forth the collaborations between the ABC News/Brian Ross Unit and the ABC local affiliate investigative teams with whom we report major consumer investigations. We believe this style of reporting on consumer issues together, combined with the way the reports are then presented around the country, is not only innovative, but service journalism in its most true form and at its finest.
  • Dangerous Doses

    For one story, “The hunt for dangerous doses,” investigative reporter Sam Roe led a collaboration with data scientists, pharmacologists and cellular researchers at Columbia University Medical Center in an attempt to discover potentially deadly combinations of prescription drugs. Intrigued by the novel data mining algorithms developed by Columbia scientist Nicholas Tatonetti, Roe proposed that the two team up to search for drug combinations that might cause a potentially fatal heart condition. Roe also recruited Dr. Ray Woosley, the leading authority on that condition and a former dean of the University of Arizona medical school, to the team. Over two years, as he orchestrated the project, Roe traveled to New York 12 times to meet with Tatonetti. They brainstormed, analyzed data and talked with Woosley via conference calls. Several of Tatonetti’s graduate students joined the team, as did Columbia cellular researchers whose work provided a critical layer of validation of the results.
  • Panama Papers

    The Panama Papers investigation, based on a massive leak of secret offshore records, exposed shell companies linked to 140 politicians in more than 50 countries – including 12 current or former world leaders. The investigation also exposed offshore companies tied to mega-banks, bribery scandals, drug kingpins, American fraudsters, arms traffickers and a network of people close to Russian President Vladimir Putin that shuffled as much as $2 billion around the world. The project was led by the Center for Public Integrity's International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and involved more than 100 news organizations from 80 countries. In all, more than 370 journalists were involved in the collaboration.
  • Contaminated Soil Lingers Where Apples Once Grew

    An Oregon Public Broadcasting and Northwest Public Radio collaboration found Washington officials failed to address known soil contamination at former orchard sites, leaving children at risk of exposure that could elevate their risk of lowered IQ, behavioral problems or cancer later in life.
  • State Integrity Investigation 2015

    The State Integrity Investigation 2015 is a data-driven examination of state government accountability, transparency and anti-corruption measures and a complete re-do for an unprecedented project first published in 2012. The investigation—a collaboration of the Center for Public Integrity and Global Integrity—resulted in a graded report card for each state, a ranking of the states and a package of more than 50 articles telling the stories behind the scores and highlighting national trends. Experienced journalists were hired in each state to research and answer 245 “integrity indicators,” on which the report cards are based, and to write short feature articles about their states.
  • Most localities fail test on state records law

    In an unusual collaboration, the Boston Globe teamed up with WCVB-TV and a class at Northeastern University to conduct the largest test ever performed of how cities and towns in Massachusetts respond to public records requests. The audit found that most cities and towns failed to meet the basic requirements of the law, taking too long to respond or ignoring requests altogether, withholding documents that are clearly public, charging onerous fees, or erecting other hurdles to obtaining information.
  • Devastating Virus

    Most people think food comes from the grocery store. So when a devastating virus hit the hog industry in Spring 2013, few people probably noticed except when it came to paying a lot more for bacon that summer. At Harvest Public Media, a public radio collaboration based in the Midwest, we know that food production is an expensive, complicated process. We investigated Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus, a fast-spreading virus never before seen in the U.S., finding an intriguing international story and a significant failure by the U.S. agency that oversees agriculture.
  • A Collaborative Investigative Reporting Initiative

    The Georgia News Lab is an award-wining investigative reporting collaborative. Its mission is to train a new generation of investigative journalists and help increase diversity in newsrooms. The project is a partnership between four of the top college journalism programs in Georgia (the University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Morehouse College, and Clark Atlanta University) and two of the dominant news outlets in the Southeast (the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and WSB-TV, an ABC affiliate). Through this unique collaboration, students learn advanced reporting techniques, work side by side with professional reporters, produce major investigative stories, and prepare for careers in investigative journalism. http://www.wsbtv.com/news/news/local/student-project-leads-ethics-investigation-subpoen/nm8r6/
  • The Pentagon Finally Details its Weapons-for-Cops Giveaway

    The Marshall Project, in collaboration with MuckRock, published, for the first time, agency-level data on the Pentagon's 1033 program, a program brought to light during the protests in Ferguson, Mo., in which the Pentagon gives surplus weapons, aircraft and vehicles to law enforcement agencies. We wrote an initial story on the data, created an easy-to-use, embeddable widget, and put together a "Department of Defense gift guide," highlighting some of the more perplexing giveaways. The story led to unprecedented public scrutiny of military equipment going to law enforcement agencies, as over forty local news outlets published articles detailing what their local cops had received.
  • Danger lurks underground from aging gas pipes

    A USA TODAY investigation, in collaboration with affiliated Gannett newspapers and television stations across the U.S., found tens of thousands of miles of aging gas pipes lurking beneath American cities and towns despite the cast-iron and bare-steel gas pipes being the subject of safety warnings by the NTSB, safety advocates and regulators for decades. The data-and-documents driven investigation delved into the make and safety of natural gas pipes operated by every utility in the United States, shining light on some cities with some of the oldest, leakiest natural gas mains across the United States in a national story, television package and a digital interactive that let users see the age and safety record for communities where they live and work, compared to national norms.