Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "school districts" ...

  • PublicSource: Failing the Future

    The project documents the wide economic and academic disparities among school districts in Pennsylvania. It tells the stories through the voices of students and educators in under-resourced districts and takes a deep dive into how school funding in Pennsylvania creates a system of "haves and have-nots." It uses both print and multi-media display.
  • ProPublica: Civil Wrongs

    Nowhere has the Trump administration's pullback on civil rights been more pronounced or damaging than in education. Under Secretary Betsy DeVos, the Education Department has deep-sixed thousands of civil rights complaints — especially those alleging systemic discrimination by school districts and colleges. In their series, "Civil Wrongs," reporters Annie Waldman of ProPublica and Erica L. Green of The New York Times exposed the department's indifference, and the toll on African-American, Latino, and Native American students from Virginia to Montana. Their work has already had significant impact, and is likely to be even more influential in 2019 as Democrats who now control the U.S. House of Representatives tackle DeVos’ civil rights record. Alongside their reporting, the team, which included news app developers Lena Groeger and David Eads, created two interactive databases: one allowing readers to look up civil rights investigations into their school districts and colleges and another illustrating racial disparities in educational opportunities and discipline.
  • Nearly 750 charter schools are whiter than the nearby district schools

    Politicians often sell charters as a solution for low-income black and brown students stuck in chronically poor-performing public schools. But Lake Oconee Academy in Georgia is one of at least 747 public charter schools around the country that enroll a higher percentage of white students than any of the traditional public schools in the school districts where they are located.
  • How Texas Keeps Tens of Thousands of Children Out of Special Education

    In “Denied,” the Houston Chronicle revealed that a group of Texas state officials had arbitrarily decided what percentage of students should receive special education services and had enforced the benchmark by intensely auditing school districts for “over-identification.” The effort, which began in 2004 but was never announced and remained completely unknown outside of district special education departments, saved the state billions of dollars but denied critical help to tens of thousands of children with disabilities. As a result, the Chronicle reported, Texas now provides special education services to a lower percentage of its students than any other state in the country – by far. If Texas gave services at the same rate as everybody else, more than 250,000 more children in the state would be receiving services such as tutoring, counseling and therapy.
  • Denied: How Texas Keeps Tens of Thousands of Children Out of Special Education

    In “Denied,” the Houston Chronicle revealed that a group of Texas state officials had arbitrarily decided what percentage of students should receive special education services and had enforced the benchmark by intensely auditing school districts for “over-identification.” The effort, which began in 2004 but was never announced and remained completely unknown outside of district special education departments, saved the state billions of dollars but denied critical help to tens of thousands of children with disabilities. As a result, the Chronicle reported, Texas now provides special education services to a lower percentage of its students than any other state in the country – by far. If Texas gave services at the same rate as everybody else, more than 250,000 more children in the state would be receiving services such as tutoring, counseling and therapy.
  • Making the Grade

    This continuing NewsChannel 5 investigation exposed questionable testing and grading practices inside one of the most highly applauded school districts in the nation. Metro Nashville Public Schools (MNPS) had earned high praise – dubbed a “District of Distinction” – for its turnaround efforts.
  • The 100-Yard Deception

    Insider records reveal trail of deceit and potential fraud as largest U.S. maker of artificial sports fields, FieldTurf, and its executives for years made ballooning profits off taxpayers in cities, towns and school districts across the country, selling a product they knew was falling apart and would fall short of marketing and advertising claims. http://fieldturf.nj.com/
  • The 100-Yard Deception

    Insider records reveal trail of deceit and potential fraud as largest U.S. maker of artificial sports fields, FieldTurf, and its executives for years made ballooning profits off taxpayers in cities, towns and school districts across the country, selling a product they knew was falling apart and would fall short of marketing and advertising claims. https://readymag.com/njdotcom/fieldturfpreview/ https://readymag.com/njdotcom/fieldturf/ https://readymag.com/njdotcom/fieldturf-new-jersey/ https://readymag.com/njdotcom/fieldturf-dipiazza/
  • Title I and School Funding Inequality

    The largest and most expensive federal education program, Title I, is meant to ensure that poor children living in high-poverty school districts have access to the same education opportunities as their wealthier peers. But our investigation found that 20 percent of Title I money – $2.6 billion – ends up in school districts with higher than average proportions of wealthy families. Because of quirks in the formula that doles out the money, Title I can often increase the local funding inequality that it was created to stop. Despite various policy proposals that would direct more money to concentrations of poverty, Congress has lacked the will to act. http://www.usnews.com/news/slideshows/which-schools-receive-the-most-title-i-funding http://www.usnews.com/photos/2016/06/01/photos-fairfax-virginia-school-district http://www.usnews.com/photos/2016/06/01/photos-nottoway-virginia-school-district
  • Eight poles nationwide have fallen recently

    The Austin American-Statesman investigated more than a half-dozen instances of stadium light poles falling nationwide, most in the last six months, and tracked the failed light poles to a company in Texas.