Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Ukraine" ...

  • Trump & Ukraine: Fact and Fiction

    The President’s men, the Vice President’s son and a single phone call: the real story of what happened in Ukraine and why it led to impeachment hearings. As the rumors and accusations surrounding President Trump’s involvement in Ukraine started to swirl, NBC’s Chief Foreign Correspondent Richard Engel travelled to Ukraine to talk to the key players on the ground to tell the story of why the Ukrainian prosecutor investigating Joe Biden’s son was really fired. Engel and his team in Ukraine secured the first broadcast interview with the man central to the story – the Ukrainian former Prosecutor Yuri Leshenko. He revealed that President Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani was applying pressure for an investigation to be reopened, in an apparent attempt to dig for dirt on a political rival. He told NBC exclusively that far from being a one-off conversation, the two had spoken “around ten times”. This information was picked up and widely reported by other media.
  • #UkraineDocs

    Our principal three stories — written by Smith and published on Dec. 13, Dec. 20, and Jan. 2 — revealed first that the Trump administration was hiding critical information about the potential legality of the President’s holdup of Ukraine aid, second that officials at the Pentagon were worried that the holdup violated a spending law, and third that the holdup ignited increasingly strident protests by Pentagon officials who said it was illegal and that it should have been disclosed to Congress.
  • Full Measure: The Foreign Connection

    Foreigners are barred from directly giving money to American politicians and political parties. But it turns out, there’s a legal way around that. It involves well-connected middlemen in the U.S., PR firms, and lobbyists, acting as foreign agents. They’re paid huge sums to get foreigners access to U.S. government officials that most Americans will never have. They may even help write our laws and direct your tax dollars to foreign interests. And when so many are talking about a foreign issue- for example, Russia, you can bet foreign agents are in the background pulling strings. For the past eight months, we’ve been examining The Foreign Connection to Russia and Ukraine.
  • Selfie Soldiers: Russia's Army Checks In To Ukraine

    As the conflict in Ukraine continues, so too does Russian President Vladimir Putin's denial of any Russian involvement. But a recent report from think tank the Atlantic Council used open source information and social media to find evidence of Russian troops across the border. Using the Atlantic Council's methodology, VICE News correspondent Simon Ostrovsky follows the digital and literal footprints of one Russian soldier, tracking him from eastern Ukraine to Siberia, to prove that Russian soldiers are fighting in Ukraine. https://news.vice.com/video/selfie-soldiers-russia-checks-in-to-ukraine
  • Crimea Property Grab

    While the world's attention was bracketed on the ongoing armed conflict in eastern Ukraine, the Associated Press set out to investigate what was also happening to the south, in Crimea, the territory unilaterally annexed by Russia from Ukraine in March. Mills, based in Moscow, and Dahlburg, then AP's Brussels news editor, and a former Moscow-based staffer for the AP and the Los Angeles Times, meticulously tracked down example after example of property taken over by Crimea's new leaders under a so-called nationalization law, against the rules of Russia's own constitution. The AP interviewed victims who lost millions in farms, factories or other assets, and whose efforts to get justice or compensation have been thwarted. The story was the first to extensively report the large-scale grab for real estate and other forms of property under way in Crimea, and to show that in some cases, the new pro-Moscow leadership installed in power had benefited personally.
  • Nazi Past

    It was a sensational find by AP reporters David Rising and Randy Herschaft _ a suspected Nazi war criminal living in the United States, hiding in plain view for more than six decades. More than just a low ranking foot soldier, suspect Michael Karkoc was an officer who commanded a combat company responsible for civilian massacres, and a founding member of the SS-led Ukrainian Self Defense Legion _ and had never before come across authorities' radar. In an eight-month investigation with reporting in more than a half dozen countries and documents in five languages, the two were able to put together evidence so solid that it has led to criminal investigations in Poland and Germany, and not officially confirmed investigations in the United States and Ukraine, with Germany already recommending that prosecutors pursue murder charges against Karkoc. Rising and Herschaft were able to prove Karkoc lied to American officials when he immigrated to Minnesota in 1949, saying he never served in the military during the war _ which has been enough in similar cases for a Nazi war crimes suspect to be deported. But the investigation went much deeper, with the two uncovering details from eyewitnesses, wartime documents and Cold War-era archives firmly establishing not only that Karkoc's unit massacred civilians, but that he specifically gave the order to attack a village in which more than 40 men, women and children were gunned down and burned in their homes.
  • "Document Dilemma"

    In a series of stories, a group of reporters investigates the illegal handling of passports and visas by criminals, the wealthy and the politically connected. Corruption and bribery often overshadow the legal process of global travel and obtaining citizenship.
  • Kuchma Approved Sale of Weapons System to Iraq

    An investigation by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and the Center for Public Integrity revealed that "Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma personally authorized the clandestine sale of $100 million worth of high technology anti-aircraft radar systems to Iraq on July 10, 2000, in violation of United Nations sanctions."
  • Billion Dollar Business

    CBS News reports on the illegal trafficking of women from Eastern Europe to Italian brothels. Christiane Amanpour from CNN, on a special assignment for 60 Minutes, tells the stories of young girls who have been recruited from bankrupt ex-socialist countries. They have been lured with promises for decent job or marriage abroad, and then sold and resold in the prostitution "cattle market." The police in the girls' home countries - Moldova, Romania, Ukraine - is aware of the illegal recruiting but is too corrupt to take any measures. Few of the victims manage to escape due to the help of Italian priests. Some find help in a shelter funded by the U.S. and Swiss governments and run by Ken Patterson from Missouri. Still, most victims remain ensnared "in an underworld controlled by ruthless gangs."
  • Shopping with Saddam Hussein

    A Commentary investigation sheds light on how Iraq has been smuggling weapons in the 90s, using middlemen in Jordan, and violating the international restrictions imposed after the Gulf War. The reporters base their findings on confidential UN reports, which have never been published. The article details how Iraqi delegations have negotiated purchases of parts, weapons or technical assistance from Belarus, Russia, Ukraine and Romania. Firms from these countries participated in shady arms deals negotiations and were ready to sell weapons and missile parts in violation of the embargo. Reporters however have found no clear proof for the realization of the deals.