Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

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  • AJC: Atlanta City Hall Investigation

    Former Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed’s administration illegally withheld public records from voters and City Council until The Atlanta Journal-Constitution forced them open, revealing $800,000 in improperly awarded employee bonuses and cash prizes, charges to city credit cards for personal entertainment and travel, and runaway spending on outside attorneys close to the mayor. The AJC also found that Reed withheld from the public and council the scope of the federal corruption investigation at City Hall, and concealed a six-figure settlement with an airport official who he fired and who later accused him of steering contracts.
  • The Swoosh Effect

    Our investigation exposed the insidious role of sneaker money in amateur basketball, offering new and damning examples of how companies such as Nike corrupt youth sports. Our reporting found that: Nike helped the family of Marvin Bagley III, a top-ranked recruit, move from bankruptcy into a gated community; Nike offered special perks to the star of its Portland grassroots team; Nike strategically offered apparel contracts to nearly all big Oregon high schools, costing the company $1 million annually; and the NCAA weakened rules for tracking shoe money in order to minimize transparency.
  • Buffalo Billion

    Investigative Post has been covering the Buffalo Billion since its inception, including a 2014 story on a curiously worded Request for Proposals that appeared to limit the field to one local developer – a major donor to the governor. In late 2015, news broke that U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara was investigating the awarding of contracts on the biggest Buffalo Billion project – the state’s commitment to spend $750 million to build and equip a factory for SolarCity, a solar panel manufacturer. Investigative Post continued to cover the Buffalo Billion, and similar initiatives in other Upstate cities, throughout 2016.
  • The Profiteers

    The tale of the Bechtel family dynasty is a classic American business story. It begins with Warren A. “Dad” Bechtel, who led a consortium that constructed the Hoover Dam. From that auspicious start, the family and its eponymous company would go on to “build the world,” from the construction of airports in Hong Kong and Doha, to pipelines and tunnels in Alaska and Europe, to mining and energy operations around the globe. Today Bechtel is one of the largest privately held corporations in the world, enriched and empowered by a long history of government contracts and the privatization of public works, made possible by an unprecedented revolving door between its San Francisco headquarters and Washington. Bechtel executives John McCone, Caspar Weinberger, and George P. Shultz segued from leadership at the company to positions as Director of the CIA, Secretary of Defense, and Secretary of State, respectively. Like all stories of empire building, the rise of Bechtel presents a complex and riveting narrative. In The Profiteers, Sally Denton, whom The New York Times called “a wonderful writer,” exposes Bechtel’s secret world and one of the biggest business and political stories of our time.
  • Bird-dogging the Buffalo Billion

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo launched the "Buffalo Billion" program in 2012 with the intention of revitalizing the Western New York economy. Investigative Post's reporting documented the extraordinary lengths to which Cuomo administration has gone to withhold disclosure of how the $1 billion is being spent. Our reporting also revealed that lucrative development contracts were awarded to major donors to Cuomo's campaign committee and that SolarCity, the major beneficiary of the state's spending, is losing vast amounts of money and under federal investigation. Subsequent reporting detailed that minority hiring goals for the SolarCity project, involving the construction of a $750 million solar panel manufacturing plant, were lowered and that African Americans made up less than 6 percent of the workforce.
  • Seven On Your Side investigates questionable spending by Hattiesburg schools

    In 2015 the Hattiesburg Public School District awarded a $219,000 contract to educational consulting company P3 Strategies. However, during the bidding process, the school district made a simple arithmetic error that may have cost taxpayers $164,000. https://vimeo.com/151898221 http://www.wdam.com/story/30373909/seven-on-your-side-investigates-questionable-spending-by-hattiesburg-schools
  • Beware the Fine Print

    Clauses buried in tens of millions of consumer and employee contracts deprive Americans of their ability to sue, jointly or individually, and insulate companies whose business practices are deceitful, damaging or illegal, creating a parallel system of justice where companies largely write the rules in their favor.
  • College of DuPage investigation

    The Chicago Tribune’s investigation of the College of DuPage – accomplished despite court orders and deception -- exposed egregious spending by top officials, exclusive contracts to insiders and ethical violations at the state’s largest community college, prompting criminal investigations, a new state law, and the college being put on probation by its accrediting agency. This entry includes 10 stories and a supplemental file that contains the accreditation agency letter citing our reports, Tribune follow-up stories showing results of our work, another publication’s article about our investigation and lawsuit, and a sample of the overwhelming response we have received.
  • Nation’s Disabled Work Program Mired in Corruption, Fraud (Keeping Them Honest)

    The nation's premier federal program that provides work for people who are severely disabled is mired in widespread corruption, financial fraud and violations of the law, sources told CNN. And instead of helping the severely disabled find work, the taxpayer-funded agency is at times allowing jobs to betaken away from the disabled, the sources say. AbilityOne, along with the nonprofit agency that manages its program for the severely disabled, ourceAmerica, are being investigated by authorities for illegal operations, financial fraud, mismanagement, operating in violation of the law, steering of contracts, and possibly obstruction of justice. Several inside sources tell CNN the program is among the worst cases of its type they've ever seen in a federal agency, covering some $2.3 billion in taxpayer-funded contracts.
  • The Tax Windfall

    These reports uncovered how subtle changes in contracts and secret business relationships with government officials led to the elimination of competition for a major vendor in the county’s new tax assessment program. We found that one former tax commissioner, who was integral in creating the program, later became an owner of an assessment firm that benefited from the contracts. A second insider firm, who had hired the father-in-law of the chief county assessor, won 90 percent of the contracts for the towns in the county required to revamp their assessments. That same company also had on its payroll the very same assessor who would be supervising their work in the various towns.