Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "division" ...

  • WSJ: The Forces Behind America's Political Divide

    Why are Americans so divided? The Wall Street Journal set out to answer this question in a set of visually-driven stories that made novel use of economic and demographic data, as well as through an analysis of the original response files from the Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll that unearthed new insights. Our exploration found that America's political divisions are being driven by economic and social forces that are fairly new in politics.
  • The Baylor Scandal

    Two years ago, Patty Crawford took the job of Title IX coordinator at Baylor University. Many believed the new full-time position was created to help the Texas Division I school after several students, including active and former members of its football team were accused, and some convicted, of sexual assault. But Crawford has resigned, saying the school was more interested in protecting its reputation than its students.
  • Information Roadblock

    This story outlines the push-back we received from city leaders when we tried to obtain emails that might explain why and how a city council member tried to closed off a public street at the request of a Homeowners Association in an affluent neighborhood without notifying, or getting any input from the residents in the adjoining subdivision. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiZO3Ctg-0M&feature=youtu.be
  • Blazer football, death and resurrection

    In late 2014 broke the story that UAB was going to become the first school in 20 years to end a Division 1 football program. Immediately our investigative reporting began, the first revelations coming just after the new 2015 year began. We dug into the financial ramifications, the decision makers behind it and the powerful movement to bring the team back. We discovered a powerful group of people did not want UAB football to exist, but our watchdog reporting fed the public the information they needed to keep fighting -- fans who wouldn't be stopped in its pursuit to return football to Birmingham, and claim black public accountability to their university.
  • Hooked: Tracking Heroin's Hold on Arizona/ Cronkite News/Arizona PBS

    Hooked: Tracking Heroin’s Hold on Arizona” is a special multimedia report produced by Cronkite News, a division of Arizona PBS, on the growing perils of heroin and opioid use. The project included this 30-minute report aired by every TV news station and most radio outlets across Arizona. The special was produced over the course of 16 weeks and included digital stories and data analyses, an accompanying mobile tablet app and Spanish-language and radio versions of the documentary. http://hookedaz.cronkitenewsonline.com/
  • Focus on Force

    An Orlando Sentinel investigation found that the Orlando Police Department used force against suspects far more often than other departments of similar size; that a small number of officers accounted for an outsize proportion of the use of force; that the department’s internal-affairs division never investigated officer violence that resulted in the city’s paying more than $1 million to settle excessive-force claims; and that the city’s downtown core accounted for one in every three instances of force used by officers against suspects.
  • University Presidents Tackle Football's Future

    Medical science, lawsuits and money are changing the landscape for college football. What do university presidents have to say about the future of a sport that causes brain damage? We contacted every Division I university president assuring them their responses would be published in their entirety. Watch University Presidents Tackle Football's Future for an overview and a surprising finding about university presidents being questioned about concussions, the risk of the concussion litigation and the cost of college athletics. http://www.presidentalfootball.com http://www.presidentialfootball.com/
  • Motherless Monkeys

    Noah Phillips' story exposed for the first time a controversial planned experiment at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that involved depriving newborn monkeys of their mothers and exposing them to frightening situations to gauge the impact on their brain functioning and behavior. The experiment calls for the monkeys to then be euthanized when they turn 1. Phillips' even-handed treatment of animal activists and researchers alike lead him to obtain unprecedented access to the facilities at UW-Madison, which has been the target of frequent protests because of its controversial animal experiments dating back to the 1940s. Phillips' story has been praised by both sides for its accurate and insightful portrayal of the proposed study. It generated significant public debate -- including an online signature campaign that garnered more than 300,000 signatures -- and revealed a deep division among UW-Madison officials about the propriety of the research, which as of this date remains stalled.
  • Ticket-Rigging Traffic Enforcement

    The KHOU I-Team discovered how a group of officers in Houston Police Department’s elite Traffic Enforcement Division listed each other on speeding tickets when they were never there--all to later collect more overtime when they appeared in court. In case after case, records showed an officer was writing a ticket at one location, but at the exact same time on the exact same day, he was listed as a “witnessing officer” on a ticket at a completely different location, miles away. One of the targets of the ticket-rigging scheme committed suicide after learning he was under investigation by the Houston Police Internal Affairs Division. The Houston City Prosecutor's office dismissed more than six thousand tickets by the officers in question "in the interest of justice."
  • SCDSS: The System Failed

    A News19 report on a 4 year old boy named Robert Guinyard Jr., who despite multiple reports of abuse, died in state care, put the spotlight on former South Carolina Department of Social Services (DSS) State Director Lillian Koller. Our investigation found multiple instances where policy says DSS should have stepped in. It would take the agency two months to publicly admit to a Senate Oversight Committee that policies were not followed in the case. The DSS Deputy State Director for Child Protective Services told us, “the system failed Robert.” News 19 reported at least 36 stories about DSS in 2014 on-air, online, and on mobile platforms. Our investigation led to the resignation of the agency’s State Director, policy changes in the Child Protective Services division, and increased funding to an understaffed guardian ad litum group that advocates for kids in state custody.