Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "parties" ...

  • Where's the party at?

    The Daily Wildcat set out to answer the age old question: where's the party at? Through FOIAs for police records The Daily Wildcat was able to collect data on where the Tucson Police Department had issued red tags, which are the citations for unruly gatherings that are commonly doled out when parties get out of hand. They created a heat map of the red tags issued around campus and created interactive data visualizations on the frequency of when red tags were issued by day of the week and calendar month.
  • 911 Dispatch Delay

    In November of 2012, a man dialed 911 for help from his apartment which had caught fire. The fire spread quickly while he was on the phone with 911. The fire took his life. An internal investigation that began the next morning and continued for the next year determined a failure to properly dispatch the fire department led to a nearly five minute delay in response. It was only the second time in the history of the Onondaga County 911 center a dispatch delay had led, in part, to a fatality. The delay was never revealed. Not to the man's family, the fire department or the public. Three years after the fire our investigation of more than eight months led to all of those parties learning of the deadly delay. We also discovered the dispatcher who was determined to be at fault served no punishment and was not retrained. http://cnycentral.com/news/local/911-commissioner-5-minute-dispatch-delay-blamed-partly-for-fiery-death http://cnycentral.com/news/local/fire-victim-tells-911-call-taker-i-dont-want-to-die-during-dispatch-delay https://youtu.be/WqkQpYKN65E https://youtu.be/TAsu2G4oWpo https://youtu.be/vLbMZltc-sE https://youtu.be/IGy14aM64GI
  • Fixed Fortunes: Biggest corporate political interests spend billions, get trillions

    In the era of billion-dollar presidential campaigns and political groups that can raise donations in unlimited amounts from almost any source, we are used to reading stories about the large amounts of money that special interests invest in politics. But what do they get out of the government they spend so much trying to influence by supporting political campaigns and parties or hiring well-connected lobbyists?
  • What Voters Don't Know: Tales of Campaign Finance Subterfuge

    It's easier now than ever for political candidates and their parties to take in and spend huge amounts money in perfectly legal, aboveboard transactions -- and for others to do so on their behalf. Still, there's plenty going on in the world of political money that intentionally is kept in the shadows, whether in the name of monetary or political profit, to keep benefactors' roles secret or simply to fatten a candidate's campaign fund with creative accounting. All of this activity keeps crucial information from the voting public. The Center for Responsive Politics' entry of five stories that sheds light on several different political money schemes that twisted the standard template of candidates, PACs and parties raising and spending funds and reporting details of those activities to regulators.
  • Saric

    The book "Saric" follows the rise of the Balkan narco-cartel and details its drug smuggling, money laundering, and corruption of politicians and businesses. The year 2004 was a breakthrough for Balkan organized crime. After Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Đinđić was assassinated in 2003, police dismantled most of crime groups in the country. Big criminals understood that to keep operating they had to change and operate smarter. They did. They formed a syndicate, they stoped selling drugs inside the country and they moved into European markets. Through their new cartel they earned billions and have used it to buy political parties, police and control over the economies of Serbia, Montenegro and other countries.
  • Election 2014: Big Money, Secret Money

    In “Election 2014: Big Money, Secret Money,” the Center for Public Integrity tracked the impact and role of political advertising ahead of the Nov. 4 elections to help voters interpret special-interest influence on state-level and U.S. Senate elections in real time. Our unique project analyzed TV advertising for state-level races, statewide ballot measures and the battle over the U.S. Senate before voters went to the polls, then analyzed the results of those races as the election returns came in on Nov. 4. The stories we produced shined a light on what were essentially shadow campaigns occurring in races up and down the ballot, where outside groups and special interests spent millions of dollars independently of candidates and political parties to influence the outcomes.
  • 935 Lies: The Future of Truth and the Decline of America's Moral Integrity

    935 Lies explores the many ways truth is manipulated by governments and corporations. Through examples ranging from the countless lies administrations of both parties have used to justify needless wars to the successful, decades-long corporate suppression of the truth about tobacco and other dangerous products, the author shows how the value of truth is diminished by delay. He explains the political, social, and business changes that have increasingly weakened the ability of journalists to play their traditional truth-telling role. And he describes the new trends, such as the new nonprofit journalism ecosystem that give reason to be hopeful about the future of truth. (excerpted from the book jacket).
  • Fixed Fortunes

    In the era of billion-dollar presidential campaigns and political groups that can raise donations in unlimited amounts from almost any source, we are used to reading stories about the large amounts of money that special interests invest in politics. But what do they get out of the government they spend so much trying to influence by supporting political campaigns and parties or hiring well-connected lobbyists? Bill Allison and Sarah Harkins set out to answer that question, compiling huge amounts of data from multiple federal sources, identifying the biggest corporate political donors over a six year period, and then compiling numbers on the various federal support -- contracts, grants, loans, loan guarantees and various programs adopted in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis -- to attempt to show what the biggest donors get from the federal government.
  • West Virginia Justice

    The ABC News Investigation into the West Virginia Supreme Court began as an examination into the role of money in judicial elections. But the reporting took an unexpected turn when ABC News made a surprising discovery about one of the Chief Justice’s biggest donors. The attorney had purchased a $1 million airplane from the justice’s husband, just as the biggest case of his career headed to her desk. The report elicited calls for a state ethics investigation. And it revived debate about the role of money in judicial campaigns, and the risk of conflicts between judges and the parties before them.
  • Sold Short

    Unscrupulous real estate agents and investors are taking advantage of distressed homeowners in one of the areas hit hardest by the real estate crash by entering into sweetheart arrangements that earn agents multiple commissions after representing both sides of a deal while investors profit from a more lucrative flip once a home is resold. By using pocket listings, agents that represent the homeowner and a prearranged cash investor prevent other parties from making offers on a house, allowing them to sell far below fair market value while the buyer earns up to $100,000+ on a resale just weeks or a few months later. In some cases, the resale value of the home is more than the mortgage owed on the property, raising questions on whether there was ever a need to short sale the property in the first place.