Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "redlining" ...

  • Reveal: Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • "Racial disparities in home lending"

    A 2008 analysis of more than half a million home loan applications in the Dayton, Ohio, region revealed that blacks with higher incomes were denied home loans, while lower-income whites were not. The report also found that blacks were more likely to receive "high-cost loans" than whites. The real estate market denies redlining practices that were made illegal "in 1977 by the federal Community Reinvestment Act."
  • Swimming with Sharks: Subprime lenders put the bite on Baltimore's poorest homeowners

    "In the 1970's, there was the original 'redlining' - financial institutions literally drawing red lines around African-American neighborhoods in which they refused to make loans...In recent years, a new twist on redlining has emerged, and once again low-income, mostly African-American residents are it target." Baltimore's City Paper takes a look at the process of predatory-lending that takes place within the inner-city thanks to 'subprime' mortgages. Subprime mortgages are high-interest, high fee loans that trap low-income in a cycle of hidden costs, defaults on loans, and foreclosure.
  • Kozmo's digital dividing lines, Kozmo.com hit with lawsuit in wake of MSNBC.com probe

    A MSNBC.com investigation of Kozmo.com, a company that promises to deliver books, music, and videos "from the Internet to your door in under an hour," reveals that "in the cities it serves, the company does not offer delivery to many neighborhoods with concentrations of black residents." Kozmo.com claims that the company only looks at Internet usage when deciding what areas to serve, but it has been unwilling to turn over this data. Civil Rights experts claim that Kozmo.com is engaging in "redlining" a discriminatory practice once used by insurance companies and banks prior to the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. Following the publication of its piece, MSNBC.com reports that two Washington D.C. residents and a Washington D.C. based advocacy group have filed a class action lawsuit against Kozmo.com for discrimination.
  • 1991 IRE TV Award Winners and Finalists Tape.

    The 1991 IRE TV Award Winners and Finalists Tape is a compilation of 5 investigative stories. 1.) "Televangelists," Prime Time Live, ABC News investigates the business practices of three highly successful and prominent televangelists who capitalize on the beliefs of their followers and collect millions of dollars in tax-free donations each year; reveals phony faith healings and high-pressure money-making schemes. See #8402. 2.) "The Great American Bailout," PBS Frontline and The Center for Investigative Reporting San Francisco reports on the Resolution Trust Corporation and how it is ignoring the needs of low-income families in its bailout of the savings and loans program. See # 8259, 8260, 8261 and 8262. 3.) "Signed Sealed and Suckered," WDHD Boston uncovers rampant redlining of minority neighborhoods and a pattern of discrimination by home improvement contractors and second mortgage lenders, charging inflated prices for shoddy work and loan interest rates of 24 %. See # 8334. 4.) "Down the Drain," WKRN, Nashville looks at the city's water and sewer department and finds hundreds of thousands of dollars in rate payers' money wasted and "Good Ole' Boy" connections. See # 8231. 5.) "Trash Fraud in Onodaga County," WSTM, Syracuse N.Y. finds fraud within the trash hauling industry in Onondaga County, N.Y. The hauling company places weights in its trucks in order to cheat the system. See # 8171.
  • (Untitled)

    The Union-Tribune examines illegitimate business expenditures of the two top administrators of the San Diego Museum of Art, a nonprofit public institution on public land and dependent on public support. (Oct. 8 - 9, 11, 13, 15 - 18, 21, 28, 1995)
  • (Untitled)

    Allegations are made against American Family Insurance, a leading Madison-based homeowner's insurance firm, because data shows a dramatic drop in market shares in the central city. The issue has taken national significance since eight black homeowners filed a lawsuit in 1990. This case is seen as the leading case in the U.S. on discrimination in insurance. (June 15, 1993)
  • Loan gap for blacks lingers

    The Miami Herald looks at how many of Florida's biggest banks in 1991 rejected black mortgage applicants at a higher rate than the year before based on Federal Reserve Board records. The records showed blacks in Florida in 1990 were almost twice as likely to be turned down as non-Hispanic whites, even when income was taken into account.
  • A Question of Color: Thirty years after 'The Dream'

    The Akron Beacon Journal reports that "Many whites are tired of hearing about it. Most blacks wish it would go away. All seem powerless to move it. Thirty years after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. described his dream of a colorblind America, race seems as huge and divisive a force as ever... We selected five areas where differences between blacks and whites in our community could be measured - overall attitudes, housing, education, economics and crime."