Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "regulation" ...

  • Loaded with Lead: How gun ranges poison workers and shooters

    Roberto Sanchez suffered silently while racked with chronic pain. James Maddox quietly endured failing health. Manny Romo privately bore guilt for inadvertently exposing his children to an unseen peril. For decades, the stories of victims like these had gone untold until The Seattle Times’ “Loaded with Lead” series exposed a hidden danger pervading one of America’s most popular and growing pastimes. This series, the first of its kind, found that America’s gun ranges put workers, shooters and their family members at risk from an insidious poison: lead. “Loaded with Lead” laid bare how outdated industry safety standards, reckless shooting-range owners and lax regulation have contributed to hundreds of lead-poisoning cases nationwide. In an unprecedented analysis, our reporters discovered that regulators have only inspected 201 of America’s 6,000 commercial gun ranges, about 3 percent, in the past decade.
  • KBS Panorama Disaster Prevention Documentary <Remember the Sewol >

    Was the Sewol tragedy really unavoidable? This program takes us back to the day when the Sewol took some 400 passengers from Incheon Port to Jeju Island. Based on the statements of all those involved, it turned out that the ferry – an old ferry imported from Japan and illegally renovated – disregarded the safety regulations to carry more freight. Greed was the underlying cause of this calamity.
  • USAT: Unfit for Flight

    "Unfit for Flight" reveals the hidden dangers of private aviation by exposing how manufacturers let defective parts and designs remain in place for decades, federal investigators fail to find defects because they do cursory crash investigations, and federal regulators let manufacturers build brand-new aircraft under safety standards that are decades old. The series exposes manufacturer negligence that has led companies to pay hundreds of millions of dollars in legal settlements, many of them confidential and reported for the first time.
  • Gun Wars: A News21 Investigation of Rights and Regulations in America

    An examination of the contentious political and cultural divide between those who say the right to own and carry guns is guaranteed by the Second Amendment and those who believe firearms should be more regulated. The project used or created nine databases to assess gun laws in every state in the nation and to document violence involving firearms across the United States. We also conducted hundreds of interviews across the country with longtime politicians, shooting victims, militia members, rural sheriffs, hunting enthusiasts, inner-city mothers and advocacy groups on all sides of the debate, to name a few.
  • How the USDA’s new ‘chicken rule’ could change what you eat, and how it’s inspected

    This special investigative report from KCPT's Hale Center for Journalism explored the possible impact of a new federal regulation known as the “chicken rule” - that could be one of the most far reaching changes in U.S. meat inspection history. Weeks before it went into effect, reporter Mike McGraw investigated how the chicken rule will allow poultry plant employees — instead of USDA inspectors — to help determine whether chicken is contaminated or safe to eat. McGraw also investigated the impact of the severe shortage of federal inspectors in slaughterhouses - critics and some inspectors claimed some meat in supermarkets stamped as “USDA inspected” may never have been inspected at all.
  • Civil Penalties Special Report

    In an unprecedented joint partnership investigation that took approximately three years, Mine Safety and Health News (MSHN) and National Public Radio (NPR) found that mining companies in the U.S. failed to pay $70 million in delinquent mine safety penalties - most for years, some for decades, and that these delinquent mine operators had accident rate 50% higher than mine operators who paid their fines. These companies: defied federal court orders to pay; committed 131,000 violations; reported nearly 4,000 injuries. The joint investigation of MSHN and NPR exposed a loophole in federal regulation, and lax enforcement that places U.S. miners at risk. The result was a special report by Mine Safety and Health News, and a series of radio stories by NPR that provided the foundation to challenge and change mine safety law in the U.S.
  • Delinquent Mines

    In a joint investigation, NPR and Mine Safety and Health News found that American coal and mineral mining companies that had failed to pay $70 million in delinquent mine safety penalties - most for years, some for decades, and some while defying federal court orders to pay - committed 131,000 violations, reported nearly 4,000 injuries and had an injury rate 50% higher than mines that paid their penalties, exposing a loophole in federal regulation and enforcement that places miners at risk.
  • Mining Misery

    These stories established the deep human toll of extractive industries in India, a country where official corruption, a push for economic growth and a lack of environmental regulation and enforcement have combined to leave millions of ordinary Indians at risk. Our pieces told that story from three different vantage points -- villagers in the shadow of a uranium mining operation in eastern India, locals left at risk of mercury poisoning from coal mines and coal-burning utilities in central India and a group of college students from southern India who met a tragic end during a field trip to the country's north, where illegal sand mining flourishes.
  • Caffeinated: How Our Daily Habit Helps, Hurts, and Hooks Us

    Caffeinated is a wide-angle investigation of the science, culture, business and regulation of America’s favorite pick-me-up. The book explores this addictive, largely unregulated drug found in coffee, energy drinks, teas, colas, chocolate, and even pain relievers. Caffeinated explains why caffeine has such a powerful effect on everything from boosting our mood to improving our athletic performance, as well as how—and why—brands such as Coca-Cola have ducked regulatory efforts for decades. And the book shows how caffeine is quietly used to reinforce our buying patterns, and how it can play a role in promoting surprising health problems like obesity and anxiety.
  • The Dark Side of the Strawberry

    California strawberry growers are hooked on a dangerous class of pesticides and, along with chemical companies, have exploited loopholes in local regulations and global treaties to keep using these chemicals, increasing cancer risk in more than 100 California communities and further depleting the ozone layer in the process. The Center for Investigative Reporting, also published online by The Guardian U.S.