Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "university" ...

  • Spartan Secrets

    ESPN’s investigation of sexual assault and abuse claims involving young women and athletes broke through the oft-held defense that the problem was just one bad actor. Our original reporting on sexual abuse claims against former Michigan State and USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar, and how the university dealt with sex assault claims against student athletes, revealed systems that enabled abuse, and involved reports of widespread mishandling – and silencing – of women who said they suffered for years after reporting their assaults. The investigation went well beyond the actions of Nassar, and unveiled a widespread pattern of denial, inaction and information suppression. Michigan State in particular did not want this information out, but through requests for data, documents and a lengthy court battle, along with securing valuable sources, ESPN prevailed in getting much of what it had requested. At the height of the #MeToo movement, ESPN’s reporting gave a voice to the women who had been silenced, and exposed the failures of the people and institutions tasked with protecting them.
  • Architecture & Design Turmoil

    This series is the result of a tip about a secret settlement with a faculty member that blossomed into a five-part series on turmoil within the Architecture and Design School at the University of Kansas. It encompasses deep background interviews and a series of public record requests.
  • Locked Out: Florida sentences are for life

    A group of University of Florida journalists investigated barriers felons face when released from prison in the Sunshine State. For four months, they followed the lives of seven felons, some just minutes after they were released. In a digital-first, Netflix-style episodic investigation, these student journalists explored how the label “felon” follows 1.6 million Floridians long after their sentences end. The student journalists looked into the three major issues Florida felons face: finding a place to live, securing a stable job and earning back their right to vote.
  • Student threatened professor more than a year before killing him

    This USC Annenberg Media special investigation uncovered that despite receiving a written warning that a student intended to kill his professor, USC administrators allowed him back on campus to work with the man he threatened and would go on to stab to death on campus. This story revealed that USC did not have a system in place to adequately track threats to campus safety and make sure students with serious mental illness were well enough to be in school.
  • Where's the party at?

    The Daily Wildcat set out to answer the age old question: where's the party at? Through FOIAs for police records The Daily Wildcat was able to collect data on where the Tucson Police Department had issued red tags, which are the citations for unruly gatherings that are commonly doled out when parties get out of hand. They created a heat map of the red tags issued around campus and created interactive data visualizations on the frequency of when red tags were issued by day of the week and calendar month.
  • Campus Undercovered

    In an investigative mini-series, the NBC News Investigative Unit undertook a deep look at an array of new and under-covered issues on college campuses. It included a first-of-its-kind investigation for a national broadcast network questioning whether on-campus sexual assault tribunals are violating due process rights, including those of alleged perpetrators. It featured a multi-month, nation-wide investigation of college mental health policies, uncovering a trend of students claiming that they have been suspended or expelled for seeking help with mental health issues. It also brought viewers a rare, frank look inside the world of prescription “smart drug” abuse. In each case, these stories triggered pointed responses from the schools involved, sometimes resulting in tangible changes in the lives of the students featured, with potentially significant implications for other students in similar situations.
  • New Jersey’s Student Loan Program is ‘State-Sanctioned Loan-Sharking’

    New Jersey’s student loan agency, the Higher Education Student Assistance Authority, has some of the most aggressive collection tactics in the industry with few reprieves, even for borrowers who’ve died. ProPublica’s series lays out how HESAA’s loans have unraveled lives – sending many families into financial ruin – to the point they’ve been described as “state-sanctioned loan-sharking.”
  • UA president attempts takeover of for-profit chain ITT Tech

    After nearly a year of reporting on University of Akron President Scott Scarborough, The Devil Strip learned he was negotiating with a for-profit education company for what they suspected was a curriculum deal. Instead, they discovered that company was brokering a deal for the university to take over ITT Tech. The small paper broke this story, which was echoed by several outlets who were shut out of the university. They, meanwhile, had Scarborough on the phone admitting to the negotiations. While the school locked down the information, Sen. Dick Durbin referenced their reporting in an address to President Obama, promising to keep an eye on UA. Soon afterwards, the university abandoned the efforts, Scarborough was removed from office and ITT Tech closed all its campuses.
  • Shoot to Kill

    With no dependable, uniform data on gun violence, it’s impossible to get even a simple tally of the number of shootings in the United States. So Baltimore Sun reporter George and Marquette University students, as part of the O’Brien Fellowship in Public Service Journalism, spent months trying to understand how many people are shot and how often they survive. What they found is that the odds of survival for gunshot victims were getting worse in at least 10 of the nation’s largest cities, including Baltimore, New York and Chicago.
  • The Baylor Scandal

    Two years ago, Patty Crawford took the job of Title IX coordinator at Baylor University. Many believed the new full-time position was created to help the Texas Division I school after several students, including active and former members of its football team were accused, and some convicted, of sexual assault. But Crawford has resigned, saying the school was more interested in protecting its reputation than its students.