Tipsheets

Browse more 5,000 tipsheets from our national conferences and Watchdog Workshops on how to cover specific beats, conduct a great interview and learn countless tips on where to find the information you need.

Logged-in members can download any tipsheet, for free. Contact the Resource Center 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org for questions.

Search results for "immigration data" ...

  • Finding the story: Immigration

    There are some 320 million people in the U.S., and 43 million of them were born abroad. About 11 million people are undocumented and over 5.1 million children have at least one undocumented parent. 860,000 people have applied for temporary legal status because they were brought to the U.S. without proper documentation as children. Over 500,000 people are waiting for their cases to be heard in immigration courts. Some 270,000 people in the U.S. came as refugees. On any given day, about 40,000 people are in immigration detention. The numbers surrounding immigration can be daunting and hard to track down. This tipsheet offers a new data set and ideas for stories to dig into locally. And discusses how to question numbers about immigration — and what to do when the government is not providing data about its immigration actions.

    Tags: immigration; immigration data; undocumented immigrants

    By Angilee Shah

    2018

  • Immigration stories in your community

    Learn how to cover immigration in your community, along with the best datasets to use and the laws to know.

    Tags: immigration; immigration data

    By Melissa del Bosque

    2019

  • Finding the Story: Immigration data

    There are some 320 million people in the U.S., and 43 million of them were born abroad. About 11 million people are undocumented and over 5.1 million children have at least one undocumented parent. 860,000 people have applied for temporary legal status because they were brought to the U.S. without proper documentation as children. Over 500,000 people are waiting for their cases to be heard in immigration courts. Some 270,000 people in the U.S. came as refugees. On any given day, about 40,000 people are in immigration detention. The numbers surrounding immigration can be daunting and hard to track down. In this tipsheet, you’ll go through some of the most useful datasets available and talk about some of the data that’s a bit tougher to find. It talks about how to use that data to get leads on local and national stories — and what to do when the government is not providing data about its immigration actions.

    Tags: undocumented; immigrants; migration; family

    By Angilee Shah

    2018

  • The Agency formerly known as the INS and the student visa program

    When the first World Trade Center attacks happened, a major overhaul commenced for Immigration and Naturalization Services. This overhaul was ready to take affect nearly a decade later when the INS was split in two by the new Homeland Security Department. Cohen discusses some key differences in the agency before and after the split. She also includes a detailed explanation of what the new system looks like and how it works. Another useful portion of the tipsheet has charts that describe different places to get immigration data, what the data includes, and any problems inherent in the data.

    Tags: immigration; INS; homeland security; education; visas; SEVIS; data; story ideas; databases; foi; census

    By Sarah Cohen

    2003