Tipsheets

Browse more 5,000 tipsheets from our national conferences and Watchdog Workshops on how to cover specific beats, conduct a great interview and learn countless tips on where to find the information you need.

Logged-in members can download any tipsheet, for free. Contact the Resource Center 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org for questions.

Search results for "military" ...

  • Successfully reporting on the military

    This tipsheet offers current "notes from the field" from experienced journalists on how to navigate closed-off waters in order to effectively report on the U.S. military.

    Tags: military; Navy; Army; Marines; Pentagon; war reporting; classified information

    By Sam LaGrone, Sig Christenson and Sarah Rafique

    2019

  • Notes from the field for successful military reporting and investigations

    The military has its own unique culture, one that requires its own formal education. But despite its exclusivity, the Pentagon requires a consistent level of scrutiny from the working press on behalf of the American people as they too have problems we see in everyday society. From war on foreign battlefields and secret classified missions to sexual assault and post-traumatic stress, service members are voiceless as they are often discouraged from speaking candidly to the media. For the new or even seasoned reporter, the task of covering the largest U.S. government agency can be daunting. This tipsheet will be current " notes from the field" from experienced journalists on how to navigate these closed-off waters in order to effectively report on the U.S. military.

    Tags: military; U.S. military; military investigations; post-traumatic stress; sexual assault; battlefields

    By James LaPorta

    2018

  • Reporting on the opioid epidemic

    Overdoses are killing more Americans each year than U.S. military deaths during the Vietnam War, yet there are only a handful of reporters on the opioid beat. Hear from reporters who are dedicated to covering the epidemic from multiple angles as they share the stories behind articles they’ve written and tips on how to cover this national crisis. Learn how to use data to show the scope of the epidemic, how to investigate pharmaceutical companies making painkillers, how to create empathy for a disease that is incredibly stigmatized, and how to navigate source-reporter relationships with active drug users and dealers.

    Tags: opioid epidemic; drug overdoses; pharmaceutical companies; big pharma; painkillers

    By Holly Baltz and James Pilcher

    2018

  • Surveillance and Tailing

    A good, but unclassified, explanation of how to conduct surveillance – and therefore how to spot and shake tails – is found in an instruction handout produced by an American paramilitary group some years ago. The original document, quoted below, can be found in the Monday Collection at the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University. While the document is somewhat dated technologically, the concepts taught in the piece remain valid. The text and punctuation have been left as originally presented and do not meet all journalistic standards for clarity and stylebook-correctness.

    Tags: tails; driving; shaking; safety; security

    By Mark Monday

    2017

  • I Am Military (And So Can You!)

    Carl Prine talks about his time as a soldier, war reporter and investigative reporter.

    Tags: war; military; soldiers; reporter

    By Carl Prine

    2017

  • Covering Defense Department Weapons Programs

    The Pentagon wants to spend about $184 billion next year on weapons procurement and research. This touches many regions. The tipsheet will outline DoD, congressional and public interest resources for tracking defense spending, and contracts and contractor performance in your readership area. It will also focus on how to develop sources and get deeply inside secretive military communities -- such as Navy SEALs and submariners -- starting at ground zero. We'll also discuss the importance of attention to detail needed to cover the military. This includes not lumping all veterans together and understanding there are intricacies to each branch. Calling a Marine a soldier is a detail that loses trust and confidence. The lack of attention to detail is one of the main reasons service members tend to distrust journalists.

    Tags: defense; spending; government

    By Tony Capaccio

    2016

  • How You Can Track U.S. Military and Police Aid

    This presentation guides us through what kinds of government military and police spending information, which database to look at and what kinds of filters to apply to get the information we want.

    Tags: government spending; taxpayer money; finance; military; police; military aid; foreign aid

    By Colby Goodman

    2016

  • Eva Parks slides from MILITARY INVESTIGATION

    Eva Parks explains how to obtain records from different branches of the military and how/where to make requests for certain documents.

    Tags: military records and information

    By Eva Parks

    2015

  • Mary Walsh slides from Notes from the E Ring and Beyond

    Mary Walsh from CBS News talks about military spending from the government.

    Tags: military; defense spending; troops

    By Mary Walsh

    2015

  • Military Investigation

    This tipsheet explains how to obtain records from different branches of the military and how/where to make requests for certain documents.

    Tags: military records and documents

    By Eva Parks

    2015