2016 IRE Conference

The best in the business will gather for more than 150 panels, hands-on classes and special presentations about covering business, public safety, government, health care, education, the military, the environment and other key beats. Speakers will share strategies for locating documents and gaining access to public records, finding the best stories and managing investigations. Join the discussion about how to practice investigative journalism in print, broadcast, Web and alternative newsroom models.

For more information, visit our conference page.

Time and place

Thursday, Jun. 16, 2016 - Sunday, Jun. 19, 2016

New Orleans Marriott
555 Canal Street
New Orleans, Louisiana 70130


Registration information

Registration for this event is open! Click here to begin.

Hurry! Registration closes on Sunday, Jun. 19 at 12:30pm.


Schedule details

  • Panel

    10 great business databases to mine for stories (Sponsored by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism)

    Speaker: Steve Doig of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    Data journalist Stephen Doig, the Knight Chair at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, will demonstrate 10 data sources you may never have heard of that can lend rich context to your business and economic stories and spark meaningful investigations in this pre-conference workshop, sponsored by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism on Wednesday, June 15 from 2-4 p.m.

    From ZIP code-level business patterns to foreign trade imports and exports and hospital data, Doig will walk you through seldom-used databases that hold treasures for reporters. You’ll learn what’s in the data sets, how to get them, what you can pull from them, what questions to ask of the data and story ideas that could be developed, and you’ll leave armed with new knowledge and fresh ideas. Registration for the workshop will begin at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 15.

    Galerie 3

    2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Preservation Booth, 2nd floor

    2:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    The jazz scene in New Orleans after Katrina

    Speaker: Don Vappie

    One of the most outstanding jazz players in New Orleans, Don Vappie, will share his insights on, how Katrina affected jazz in New Orleans. He will cover the discussions between musicians, the jazz scene and the music. He will demonstrate with his banjo and song.

    Balcony K

    4:30 pm - 6:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Preservation Booth, 2nd floor

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Thursday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.  Sales will be located in Preservation Hall on the 2nd floor of the New Orleans Marriott.

    Preservation Hall

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Salon E

    8:30 am - 8:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Mapping Camp *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: David Herzog of IRE and NICAR; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    Learn how to uncover interesting news stories by mapping data with geographic information system (GIS) software during our intensive mini-boot camp and receive a free copy of ArcGIS Desktop*.

    IRE and NICAR trainers conduct this hands-on training using the latest version of ArcGIS Desktop. We will look at noteworthy stories that have used mapping and show you how to uncover stories using census and other data. You’ll learn how to display data geographically; import and query data; geocode to merge databases with addresses into maps. Attendees will also learn how ArcGIS Online may help as a storytelling platform. In addition, we'll provide you with our boot camp materials to help keep you on track long after you leave the conference. 

    Participants should have some experience working with data in a relational database manager, such as Microsoft Access or MySQL. Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training. Please note the desktop software is available only for Windows but ArcGIS Online can be used from any platform.

    *Attendees of the boot camp have the option to receive the following discounts from Esri. (1) A free license of ArcGIS Desktop that will not expire and includes one year call-in technical support and upgrades at no cost. Call-in technical support and upgrades are available on a nominal fee basis in year two. (2) A free one-year subscription to ArcGIS Online that includes access to Esri's Community Analyst database. Please contact the Esri Media Relations team press@esri.com for further information. The desktop software is available only for Windows but ArcGIS Online can be used from any platform.

    Attendees must be registered for the conference to attend this workshop.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Salon A

    9:00 am - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    An insider's guide to IRE16

    Speakers: Kristin Hussey of independent journalist; Sarah Hutchins of IRE and NICAR; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV; Charlotte Huffman of WFAA-Dallas/Fort Worth

    **Moderated by Megan Luther, IRE/NICAR

    Your first (or second, or third) IRE Conference can be overwhelming. This panel will provide tips on how to make the most of your time in New Orleans. Learn from our mistakes and figure out which sessions will best fit your needs. We'll also show you how to make the most of your IRE membership so you can continue to benefit once you're back home.

    Salon E

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Preservation Hall

    9:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Demo

    Follow the money to tax havens (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Miranda Patrucic of Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project

    You don't always need the Panama Papers to get Panama Papers. In fact, a share of the records used in the historic groundbreaking investigation was actually gathered from offshore public record depositories around the world. In this session, you will learn how to access the records from tax heavens that seem impossible to get.

    Galerie 1

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Getting your stuff together

    Speakers: Andrea Parquet-Taylor of WNCN-Raleigh; Cheryl W. Thompson of NPR; Marina Trahan Martinez of independent journalist; T. Christian Miller of ProPublica

    **Moderated by T. Christian Miller, ProPublica

    It's an unsung talent: being organized. But it's crucial to pulling off long projects and cranking out investigations while on the beat. In this session, we'll go step-by-step through reporters' own processes to see how they manage time and information, including tips on specific tools to use.

    Salon D

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Interactive data graphics in Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Ben Jones of Tableau Software

    Learn how to create beautiful, interactive data visualizations on short deadlines. No programming required. You'll learn everything you need to build data visualizations and publish them to your website just like a video. We'll teach you how to:

    •Connect to Excel files and other data
    •Create maps and charts
    •Make them interactive
    •Publish them on your site

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. No previous experience with Tableau is necessary to take this class. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class. Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class

    Salon C

    9:00 am - 10:30 am

  • Panel

    Investigative parternships

    Speakers: Jeff Adelson of The New Orleans Advocate; Keith Esparros of CBS - WWL/New Orleans; Manuel Torres of The Times-Picayune; Ellen Gabler of The New York Times; Greg Phillips of WMC-Memphis

    **Moderated by Ellen Gabler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Hear from two powerhouse reporting teams that produced major investigations through partnerships. We’ll discuss why you’d even want to partner; how to build trust between reporting teams; tips for managing deadlines and multiple editors; and how to handle the general logistics of collaborating between newsrooms. Our panelists melded talent from online, print and TV news organizations to supersize their investigations - and will explain how you can do the same.

    Studio 9-10

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Investigative reporting on a shoestring

    Speakers: Trevor Aaronson of The Intercept; Lee Fang of The Intercept; Kathryn Joyce of independent journalist; Kelly Virella of The Investigative Fund; Esther Kaplan of The Investigative Fund; Seth Wessler of Investigative Fund

    **Moderated by Esther Kaplan, The Investigative Fund

    Many IRE award-winning stories are produced by large teams. But what if you're an army of one? This panel is designed for freelancers and reporters in tiny newsrooms who want to think big on investigations without being able to lean on robust newsroom resources.

     

    Galerie 3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Thursday - #1 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Kevin Keeshan of NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations

    **Moderated by Kevin Keeshan, NBC Owned Television Stations

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Thursday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Wednesday.

    Galerie 2

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Tracking government spending

    Speakers: Ziva Branstetter of The Washington Post; Colby Goodman of Center for International Policy; Norberto Santana of Voice of OC

    Tracking government spending isn’t just about aimlessly pouring over data and looking for trends. It’s about connecting the dots, showing human impacts of government spending – or lack thereof - as well as detailing how special interests shape government. In this session, you’ll learn how to really open up government budgets, as well as standard agency financial disclosures, conflict of interest forms for government officials and connect campaign finance data to government contracts to tell compelling stories.

    Salon F-H

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Web scraping for anyone

    Speaker: Samantha Sunne of independent journalist

    You don't have to write code to coax data off the web - with some clicks and tricks and elbow grease, you can get data and documents even your sources don't want you to have. We'll cover tools you can use out of the box, more advanced techniques, plus secret Internet passageways to the data you want.

    Salon B

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Who can read your story? The digital divide (Sponsored by Media Democracy Fund)

    Speakers: Christopher Mitchell of Institute for Local Self-Reliance; Matthew Rantanen of Native Public Media; Michael Scurato of National Hispanic Media Coalition

    Fifteen percent of Americans don’t use the internet—and they aren’t all seniors. In rural areas, on reservations and in prisons, many users simply don’t have access. The story of lack of access deepens when we overlay “access” with economic data. For example, 62% of Spanish-dominant Latinos do not have broadband access at home. A significant number of users can’t afford to have access when or how they want it.

    We’ll explore questions like, do users really have internet access if the only access is mobile wireless or, if the cost is 10% of their monthly wage? Will the proposed lifeline program impact a significant number of people? Speakers will also explain the implications of lifeline access, the hope community broadband offers, and provide tools/sources so you can investigate internet access across geographic, demographic and policy lines.

    Galerie 4-5

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: When things change dramatically

    Speakers: Jodie Fleischer of NBC4 Washington; Chris Nakamoto of WBRZ - Baton Rouge; Rick Yarborough of NBC4 Washington

    We all try to make sure every detail is buttoned up before airing an investigation. But sometimes that curve ball is just unavoidable. This panel will focus on unusual developments with investigations. From last minute court settlements aimed at squashing your report, to your source unexpectedly becoming the subject of your investigation, or even reporters finding themselves in handcuffs. Hear how these journalists dealt with the 11th hour developments and still got their stories on air.

    Galerie 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Deep dives: Issues you can explore in your community

    Speakers: Katherine Sayre of The Times-Picayune; Jessica Terrell of Honolulu Civil Beat; Todd Wallack of The Boston Globe; Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters

    **Moderated by Jaimi Dowdell, IRE/NICAR

    Three veteran journalists will share tips and lessons they learned covering stories about homelessness, a dying town, residential parking, government boards and more. You'll leave this session with a pocketful of evergreen ideas along with guidance on how to make the stories come to life.

    Salon F-H

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Educators: Doing investigations with students

    Speakers: Deborah Nelson of University of Maryland; Neil Reisner of Florida International University; Mark Horvit of University of Missouri; Brandon Quester of inewsource

    **Moderated by Mark Horvit, IRE/NICAR

    More and more investigative journalism is being conducted on college campuses. Several professors who work with students to conduct in-depth projects will talk about how they select topics, manage students (individuals and teams) and help them overcome obstacles.

    Studio 9-10

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Excel 1: Getting started with spreadsheets

    Speaker: Patti DiVincenzo of IRE and NICAR

    In this introduction to spreadsheets you'll begin analyzing data with Excel, a simple but powerful tool. You'll learn how to enter data, sort it, filter it and conduct simple calculations like sum, average and median.

    Prerequisites: None.

    Salon B

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: How to enter (and win) a duPont Award

    Speaker: Lisa R. Cohen of Columbia Journalism School

    **Moderated by Lisa R. Cohen, Columbia Journalism School

    In this session, Lisa R. Cohen will discuss and demystify the duPont Award process. She will be joined by former award winners Cheryl Devall, Reveal/CIR; Jason Trahan, WFAA-Dallas/Fort Worth and Lee Zurik, WVUE-New Orleans.

    Preservation Hall

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Thursday - #2 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Susana Schuler of Raycom Media

    **Moderated by Susana Schuler, Raycom Media

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Thursday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Wednesday.

    Galerie 2

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    Tools and tips for the reporting process (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Daniel Connolly of The Commercial Appeal; Lauren Grandestaff of IRE and NICAR; Jesse Patel of WorkFlowy

    Organization and time management can challenge even the most experienced investigative reporter. In this session, you’ll see demos of electronic tools that make your life easier. From the very start of your story to hitting publish, these tools will allow you to manage even the biggest of projects. Scrivener allows you to keep track of documents, photos, audio recordings and video, all in the same investigation file. DocumentCloud allows you to track piles of documents for your investigations, collaborate amongst your newsroom and others, and present the most important parts to the public. And Workflowy, lets you take notes, make lists, collaborate, brainstorm and plan your life.

    Galerie 1

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Tracking down investigative threads

    Speakers: Charles Lewis of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Alison Young of Missouri School of Journalism; Dan Kane of The News & Observer

    How do you find and choose which investigative threads to follow? How do you stay on track when you have too many threads interweaving simultaneously? What do you do when the thread you are chasing goes dark? How do you keep from getting lost along the way? Hear how three investigative reporters approach these problems to produce high-impact stories. And they’ll give you practical tips for organizing reporting and keeping complex projects on track – especially if you are juggling other stories at the same time.

    Galerie 4-5

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Watchdogging sports

    Speakers: Paula Lavigne of ESPN; Noah Pransky of independent journalist; Brad Wolverton of NerdWallet

    From youth basketball to college hockey to the National Football League, sports is not just a form of entertainment, but a multi-billion-dollar industry and a force for social change with local, national and global impact. Find out how to examine the financial, social, medical, legal, criminal and other off-field aspects of sports organizations and teams and the myriad of agencies that regulate them. And learn about the unique aspects of investigating athletes beyond the locker room.

    Salon D

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Working with African newsrooms: From collaboration to coding (Sponsored by International Center for Journalists)

    Speakers: David Lemayian of Code for Africa; Amanda Strydom of African Network of Centers for Investigative Reporting (ANCIR)

    From power cuts to palace coups, working with African newsrooms is never simple. But for all its challenges, the continent is also one of the most mobile and connected. This unique mix of high and low tech creates opportunities for experimentation unheard of in the developed world. Lemayian and Strydom will give you a glimpse on how they are getting African newsrooms to collaborate and innovate.

    Salon E

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Advanced design and interaction in Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Dash Davidson of Tableau Software

    Analyzing data and coming up interactive visualizations is easy in Tableau but sometimes getting everything looking polished isn’t. In this session you will learn how to break away from the default formatting in Tableau Public to create interactive data graphics that match your style guides and engage your readers. We will teach you how to:

    •change colors, shapes, borders, fonts, and other basic formatting
    •incorporate images, logos, and other graphic elements
    •take advantage of advanced interaction techniques to incorporate multimedia
    •utilize design and layout best practices to make sure that your visualization looks polished and professional

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. Some familiarity with the product is recommended; a beginner session earlier in the day should prepare you enough for this session. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class. Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class

    Salon C

    11:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Data viz storytelling

    Speakers: Dianne Finch of Kent State University; Ed Lowther of BBC News; Shane Shifflett of The Wall Street Journal; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University

    **Moderated by Cheryl Phillips, Stanford University

    There are maps, charts and interactives to be built and pie charts to avoid, for sure. But the truth is, just like anything in journalism, making a data visualization that works is all about the story. The trick is knowing enough about the structure and forms to make the viz it’s own kind of narrative. Learn some of the best practices and key tips to make your data visualizations sing.

    Salon D

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Do criminal and municipal courts treat defendants fairly? (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)

    Speakers: Judge Arthur L. Hunter, Jr. of Orleans Parish Criminal District Court; John Simerman of The Advocate; Kendall Taggart of BuzzFeed News; Ted Gest of Criminal Justice Journalists

     **Moderated by Ted Gest, Criminal Justice Journalists

     

    The aftermath of the Ferguson, Mo., police shooting raised questions about how lower courts around the nation are treating defendants in a wide variety of cases. Critics say that some jurisdictions have been operating courts in ways that discriminate against minorities and others who cannot easily get legal help or pay fines in relatively minor cases. Reporters who follow these questions and a judge from a large urban court will discuss how journalists can report in depth on legal issues that often don't get much play in local media.

     

    Studio 9-10

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Excel 2: Functions and pivot tables

    Speaker: Crina Boros of independent journalist

    In this class you'll learn how to use formulas to analyze data with the eye of a journalist using calculations like change, percent change and rates. It will also focus on the power of pivot tables for analysis in minutes rather than hours.

    Prerequisites: This class will be most helpful if you’ve taken Excel 1 or have worked with a spreadsheet in the past.

    Salon B

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Following the money (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Rob Barry of The Wall Street Journal; Mark Lagerkvist of On-The-Mark Media; Michael Sallah of USA TODAY Network; Duane Pohlman of Sinclair Broadcast Group

    **Moderated by Duane Pohlman, WCMH/NBC4 Columbus

    Sure it's a cliche. But it's still some of the best advice in journalism: track the funds to find the power, or the problems, or the answers. Three veteran journalists give tips and examples that will help you find the key money trails in your own stories.

    Salon F-H

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    From lone wolf to team player: The evolution of the investigative reporter

    Speakers: Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop; James B. Steele of independent journalist; Roy Harris of Author; James Grimaldi of The Wall Street Journal

    **Moderated by Roy Harris, independent journalist

    Investigative journalism at the turn of the 20th Century relied, for the most part, on a breed of driven newspaper and magazine reporters working solo, and keeping their sources to themselves. Much changed starting in the 1960s, with the rise of team journalism (including the birth of IRE) at places like Bob Greene’s Newsday and the Boston Globe’s Spotlight operation. Duos along the lines of Woodward-Bernstein and Barlett-Steele sprang up, and so did investigative editing specialists and, recently, intra-organizational collaborations. Reporting and editing legends Jim Steele and James Grimaldi join the Center for Investigative Reporting’s Jennifer LaFleur in a discussion of what’s been gained, and lost, along the way. Roy Harris, author of “Pulitzer’s Gold,” a book on the century-long tradition of winners in the public service category, moderates.

    Salon E

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    Government data to drive your stories (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Troy Thibodeaux of The Associated Press; Tyson Weister of U.S. Census Bureau

    In this session we'll take a tour of some useful government data sources along with tips for getting the most from them. In addition, we'll offer a deep dive into data available from the U.S. Census Bureau.

    Galerie 1

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: Story clinic

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Mark Horvit of University of Missouri; Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV; Alex Richards of NerdWallet

    Got a question on how to pursue a story? Curious about how to approach a FOIA? Stumped by some data? IRE and NICAR staff will be available to offer advice. Story consultations are confidential and will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Preservation Hall

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Thursday - #3 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Patti Dennis of TEGNA Inc.

    **Moderated by Patti Dennis, TEGNA, Inc.

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Thursday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Wednesday.

    Galerie 2

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    The art of cultivating and protecting whistleblowers (Sponsored by NBC News and MSNBC)

    Speakers: Michael Hudson of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Marta Jewson of The Lens; Angie Moreschi of James Hoyer Law Firm; Josh Meyer of POLITICO

    **Moderated by Josh Meyer, NBC News

    Finding, cultivating – and protecting – whistleblowers is both a science and an art, and it has long been a cornerstone of good watchdog journalism. Doing it right can often mean the difference between a decent story and a great, and potentially prize-winning, one. But mishandling well-placed sources who leak information has all sorts of pitfalls for everyone involved. Learn the nuts and bolts of working with whistleblowers from some of the best – journalists who have used them with great success on the local, national and international level. ​

    Galerie 4-5

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Uncovering stories on the health beat

    Speakers: Ellen Gabler of The New York Times; Ryann Grochowski Jones of ProPublica; Jeanne Whalen of The Wall Street Journal; Jenn Abelson of The Boston Globe

    **Moderated by Ellen Gabler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Tap into the full potential of investigations on the health beat. We’ll talk about where to look for ideas, how to negotiate for data and documents, and finding people who have been affected by whatever you’re writing about. As healthcare costs soar and pandemics travel across borders, the interest in these stories is huge. Get specific tips on dealing with government agencies, finding experts and sorting through science when people are trying to confuse you.

    Galerie 3

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding and telling data stories with Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Ben Jones of Tableau Software

    Got a dataset and an impending deadline to write a story on it? Find the scoop and convey it with beautiful, interactive visualizations in a serial narrative using Tableau Public. It’s a fast, easy to use, and free tool for journalists. Visualizations will publish using any CMS and no programming is required. 

    We’ll teach you how to:

    •Connect to Excel files and other file types
    •Rapidly explore and analyze datasets with ease
    •Make eye-catching visualizations to share your findings
    •Add interactivity and arrange them in a serial narrative to engage and sustain your audience’s attention

    No previous experience with Tableau is necessary to attend. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class. Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class

    Salon C

    1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

  • IRE Board of Directors Meeting

    IRE Board Meeting

    The IRE Board of Directors will meet at 2 p.m. Thursday in New Orleans as part of the annual conference.  The meeting is open to all IRE members.

    Riverview I

    2:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    50 apps in 30 minutes (+ 30 minutes of other cool stuff)

    Speaker: David Ho of The Wall Street Journal

    Supercharge your smartphone for reporting! The Wall Street Journal's Executive Mobile Editor David Ho will help you turn your phone into a Swiss Army Knife of journalism goodness with this always-updating and fun session on apps and tools for gathering and producing news. Want to use your phone to record interviews? Take better notes? Transcribe audio? Edit video? Track tweets? Talk on camera? ID airplanes? Translate Swahili? There's an app for that. Plus, learn about more tips, tricks and mobile gear.

    Salon E

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast deep dives 1 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speakers: Steve Eckert of KARE 11 Minneapolis/St. Paul; A. J. Lagoe of KARE 11 Minneapolis/St. Paul; Scott Friedman of KXAS/NBC5 Dallas-Fort Worth; Eva Parks of KXAS/NBC5 Dallas-Fort Worth; Andy Pierrotti of WXIA-Atlanta

    Hear five award-winning investigative journalists explain how they produced big projects for broadcast and online. Journalists will show their investigations and then take you step by step, from story tip to a finished product.

    Galerie 2

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast showcase: The changing network landscape

    Speakers: Len Tepper of CBS News; Scott Zamost of CNBC; Lea Thompson of independent journalist

    **Moderated by Lea Thompson, formerly NBC News

    They have all the big awards, they do the huge important stories, they are superstar producers at ABC, CBS and CNN. They’re going to show you how they do it, how what they do has changed through the years and, yes, they’ll give you insight on how you can get there too. Is there a difference between local and network television? How do network investigative units handle breaking news and the 24/7 news cycle? These producers know how to pick and drive stories and are masters at integrating on-air and on-web. They’ll tell you how to stay out of trouble and share tips on how to keep delivering year after year.

    Galerie 3

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Educators: Lightning talks

    Speaker: Brant Houston of University of Illinois

    **Moderated by Brant Houston, University of Illinois

    What works best when teaching college-level investigative reporting or data journalism courses? Find out in this session featuring a series of 5-minute lightning talks dedicated to teaching students how to use documents and data in journalism. Instructors will highlight successful approaches, best teaching techniques, data for students, and more. The following speakers have been selected to present:

    Dianne Finch, Elon University

    Dee J. Hall, Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism

    Lorie Hearn, inewsource

    David Herzog, IRE/NICAR

    Brant Houston, University of Illinois

    Courtney Mabeus, The Virginian-Pilot

    Deborah Nelson, University of Maryland

    Brian O'Donoghue, University of Alaska Fairbanks

    Cheryl Phillips, Stanford University

    Studio 9-10

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Getting data into Excel

    Speaker: Rui Kaneya of The Center for Public Integrity

    Don't let hard-to-use data ruin your day. Learn how to import a variety of formats (such as text files, HTML tables, PDFs) into Excel.

    Prerequisites: None.

    Salon B

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating inequality

    Speakers: Nikole Hannah-Jones of The New York Times Magazine; Kristal Brent Zook of Hofstra University

    Salon D

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating realities: Approaches to reporting, production, and development with VR

    Speakers: Trey Bundy of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Lakshmi Sarah of Immersed in Journalism; Robert Hernandez of University of Southern California - Annenberg; Stephan Gensch of VRagments

    **Moderated by Robert Hernandez, University of Southern California - Annenberg

    As 360° video and VR settles into being an essential platform for journalism, a number of critical questions emerge to challenge reporters and newsrooms. Especially when the promise of deeper empathy collides with the risks of voyeurism as audiences explore subjects and sources in ways never contemplated by the 2D Web. This session will explore the technical and editorial opportunities and implications of the technology. Panelists include reporters, technologists and designers working at the front edge of this important new space.

    Salon F-H

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Demo

    Investigating supply chains (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Richard Marosi of Los Angeles Times

    Coffee, cocoa, sneakers and shrimp: Where are these coming from and who are the laborers producing, processing and making them? As global trade makes it cheaper and faster to outsource labor, it’s more important than ever for journalists to hold corporations accountable for the social, environmental and health impacts of their products. This means tracking consumer goods back to their source with specific, accurate detail. During this session we’re talking supply chain tracking methodology, from staking out factories and following trucks, to satellite photos, document dives and other resources to help journalists follow the goods.

    Galerie 1

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: How to develop your own hyper personalized organizational system

    Speaker: Jesse Patel of WorkFlowy

    **Moderated by Jesse Patel, WorkFlowy

    In this session, Jesse Patel will work with people one-on-one to create a custom set up in WorkFlowy, the powerful organizational tool he helps develop. He will show you how to create an organizational system perfectly tailored to your way of working and thinking. He'll go through as many people as he can in the time allotted, with everyone watching and contributing ideas. Jesse is happy to keep working with people after the time expires if there isn't enough time to work with everyone who attends.

    Preservation Hall

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    The fight for (information) freedom (Sponsored by Press Club of New Orleans)

    Speakers: Karen Gadbois of The Lens; Robert McClendon of The Times-Picayune, NOLA.com; Katie Moore of CBS - WWL/New Orleans; Lee Zurik of WVUE-New Orleans; Scott Sternberg of Louisiana Press Association

    An examination of how to survive and thrive in the age of the Freedom of Information Act and other access laws. A panel of award-winning journalists and experts will discuss best practices, tips and strategies that have helped in navigating FOIA, and the challenges and barriers while working to access and collect data, records and other information made available to the public under the law.

    Galerie 4-5

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Demo

    5 hacks to get started in data or tech (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Samantha Sunne of independent journalist

    Everyone needs to know data these days. You’re definitely gonna get right on it… as soon you’ve finished this story, and covered the city council meeting, and learned to write Python - whatever that is. Or, you could put off Python a while longer, and use these five hacks to work data in the reporting you're already doing.

    Galerie 1

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Investigating your local school system

    Speakers: Eric Flack of WUSA9 Washington; Kelly Hinchcliffe of WRAL-Raleigh; Jenna Susko of NBC4 Los Angeles

    Public school systems can be the single biggest bureaucratic entity outside of state government, in some places, even bigger. What are the richest opportunities for journalists to expose waste, abuse and misuse of taxpayer dollars? This wide ranging panel will dig deep for impactful reporting on public schools.

    Galerie 3

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Campus coverage: The cost of going to college

    Speakers: Jon Marcus of The Hechinger Report; Gordon Russell of The Advocate; Alex Richards of NerdWallet

    **Moderated by Alex Richards, IRE/NICAR

    The cost of going to college is somewhat of a shell game. Even with discounts and financial aid, low-income students often end up paying more. Administrative costs have skyrocketed with luxury posts. Our panelists will show you how to use data and shoe-leather reporting to dig into the divide between the rich and the poor, how to challenge conventional wisdom and show the fallout of higher ed policies.

    Galerie 4-5

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Cleaning data with OpenRefine

    Speakers: Robert Gebeloff of The New York Times; Nils Mulvad of Kaas & Mulvad

    OpenRefine is a good tool to clean really dirty data -- the kind of data in which the same name might be spelled in 30 different ways. It has built-in cleaning tools for analysts and journalists.

    This session will be most useful if: You have some experience working with data in columns and rows, in spreadsheets or database managers.

    Salon B

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Designing Tableau visualizations for mobile (Hosted by Tableau) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Dash Davidson of Tableau Software

    Are mobile readers of your news site becoming more and more common? If your news organization is like others we’ve worked with, the percent of readers using phones and tablets to read your content is well over half of the overall number, and growing fast. Creating data visualizations for these small form-factors is very challenging. Learn how to use Tableau to create sheets and dashboards that work great, even on phones and tablets. 

    •Design considerations, including layout and formatting
    •Dashboard sizing for a range of screen widths
    •Interactivity – filtering and tooltips
    •Options to embed visualizations to respond to reader device

    Some experience with Tableau Public is recommended. Taking one of the earlier Tableau sessions should suffice. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the IRE Conference to attend this class. Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class

    Salon C

    3:45 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Management: Just say no (or yes) - Vetting story ideas

    Speakers: Flynn McRoberts of Bloomberg News; Amy Pyle of USA TODAY Network; Jennifer Forsyth of The Wall Street Journal

    Panelists will provide advice on how to deploy scarce resources toward the most impactful and memorable investigations. Topics will include how to assess if a journalist can deliver on an idea; strategies for converting weak proposals into powerful ones and solid enterprise ideas into investigations; and how to manage disappointment when an idea falls short or must be sidelined for something more urgent. Panelists also will suggest ways to avoid common mistakes that journalists make in conceiving and executing investigations.

    Salon F-H

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Special Event

    Preservation Hall

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Outlook potentially negative: When PIOs fight back

    Speakers: Jack Gillum of ProPublica; John Kelly of USA TODAY Network; Michael Morisy of MuckRock; Maud Beelman of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    **Moderated by Maud Beelman, The Associated Press

    This session will offer great tips for working with or working around public information officers, especially when they become roadblocks to your investigation or seek to discredit your reporting. The panelists will also offer strategies for successful open records requests, which increasingly are passing through the press department rather than an agency's FOIA office.

    Salon D

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Thursday - #4 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Keith Esparros of CBS - WWL/New Orleans

    **Moderated by Keith Esparros, CBS - WWL/New Orleans

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Thursday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Wednesday.

    Galerie 2

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    The business of freelancing: Securing grants (Sponsored by the Fund for Investigative Journalism and FIRE)

    Speakers: Esther Kaplan of The Investigative Fund; Stephen Sapienza of Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting; Jane Sasseen of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism; Laird Townsend of Freelance Investigative Reporters and Editors (FIRE); Brant Houston of University of Illinois; Ricardo Sandoval-Palos of PBS

     **Moderated by Brant Houston, University of Illinois

    Leaders from organizations that give grants to freelancers will explain what kinds of stories they are looking for and what you need to do to successfully apply for a grant. This will be a robust question and answer session.

    Salon E

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Understanding crime and justice statistics -- new challenges and a new guide from IRE (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)

    Speakers: Daniel Lathrop of University of Iowa; Ben Poston of Los Angeles Times; Jodi Upton of Syracuse University; Ted Gest of Criminal Justice Journalists

    **Moderated by Ted Gest, Criminal Justice Journalists

    The widespread interest in shootings by police and mass murders, and the unexpected increase in homicides in many major cities, has focused attention on the major gaps in crime and justice data available in the U.S. In this session, as IRE and Criminal Justice Journalists have just updated the guide for reporters, we'll talk about how to get and interpret the latest government and private-sector reports.

    Studio 9-10

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    #Black(media)matters (Sponsored by The Louisiana Weekly)

    Speakers: Anthony Advincula of New America Media; Renette Dejoie-Hall of The Louisiana Weekly; Jinx Broussard of Louisiana State University; Kristal Brent Zook of Hofstra University; David Baker of The Louisiana Weekly

    **Moderated by Renette Dejoie-Hall, The Louisiana Weekly

    Black Media Matters is a one-hour moderated discussion on the state of Black media, the unique space occupied by Black media, and other hyper-local media outlets whose coverage focuses primarily on issues of social, economic and environmental equality, equity and justice. From Selma in 1965 to #BlackLivesMatter, from Hill v. Thomas to Roe v. Wade, and from Hurricane Katrina to the BP oil spill, this discussion will focus on reporting the issues affecting marginalized communities from the inside out.

    Panelists will discuss their experiences in taking national and global issues and reporting on those topics from the perspective of some of the nation’s most marginalized communities -- exploring the techniques, strategies and methods journalists have used to navigate and report on the often divisive subjects of age, ethnicity, gender, nationality, race, religion, and sexuality to produce news content that offers a diversity of views, and are compelling, fact-based and fair.

    Studio 9-10

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Demo

    Automate and turbocharge your social media (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR

    Learn how to curate social media content with tools such as Dlvr.it, Feedly and Scoop.It. See how to combine those tools with Buffer to automatically post updates on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and other platforms. Discover how to create recipes with the free If This, Then That (IFTTT) service to track hashtags or key phrases on social channels and download results automatically. Monitor tweets from a specific place (e.g. the statehouse) and download them automatically to a spreadsheet. And much, more more. No programming skills needed.

    Galerie 1

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Campaign 2016: Backgrounding candidates and measuring effectiveness (Sponsored by Rockefeller Brothers Fund)

    Speakers: Steve Eder of The New York Times; James Grimaldi of The Wall Street Journal; Jonathan Salant of NJ Advance Media; Kathy Kiely of University of Missouri

    **Moderated by Kathy Kiely, BillMoyers.com

    Candidates for public office have more funds than ever for spin machines, just as most newsrooms have less money than ever for reporting resources. Don’t despair! A panel of veteran money-in-politics reporters will offer tricks and tips for getting past political hopefuls’ press releases and determining whose interests the candidates have been serving or are likely to serve. Whether the contest you're covering is for president of the United States or president of the school board, these pointers should help you hold power accountable — and help your readers cast more informed votes.

    Galerie 4-5

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Covering 21st century policing in the social media age​ (Sponsored by Criminal Justice Journalists)​

    Speakers: Kimberly Kindy of The Washington Post; Brad Schrade of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Ronal Serpas of Loyola University; Ted Gest of Criminal Justice Journalists

    **Moderated by Ted Gest, Criminal Justice Journalists

    Are today's police officers in the U.S. more abusive than they used to be, or is it just that a few bad apples are being readily exposed by ubiquitous video cameras? How should journalists be covering developments in policing, including changes in training and investigations of drugs and other crime problems? Journalists who cover these issues will be joined by a veteran police official who argues that law enforcement can reduce both crime and incarceration.

    Salon D

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Failures of enforcement

    Speakers: Howard Berkes of NPR; David Heath of The Information; Ziva Branstetter of The Washington Post; Jeremy Schwartz of Austin American-Statesman

    **Moderated by Ziva Branstetter, The Frontier

    Panelists will discuss how government agencies have the authority, means and responsibility to regulate and enforce, but often lack the will. Discussion will include, how to use agency data to write about the human toll this culture of inaction takes and the impact it has on subjects as diverse as mine workers, migrant laborers and abused children. This panel will also focus on how to sift through the records and data to find good human examples and bring the story alive. 

     

    Salon E

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Humanizing numbers

    Speakers: Andrew Lehren of NBC News; Kendall Taggart of BuzzFeed News; Mc Nelly Torres of independent journalist

    Data helps you tell your story, yet for journalists, the most important work remains the human story and giving insight into individuals. Come to this session to see how data journalists help their readers empathize and how they balance analysis with narrative. Panelists will share how they write effectively about statistics, use data to find real people to interview, and develop data visualizations that bring numbers to life. We will show great examples that we admire and we'll share concrete tips from our own work.

    Salon F-H

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating in the wake of disaster (Sponsored by Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma)

    Speakers: Jason Berry of Author; Laura Sullivan of NPR; Bruce Shapiro of Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma; Justin Elliott of ProPublica; Rick Young of FRONTLINE; Irwin Redlener of National Center for Disaster Preparedness

    **Moderated by Bruce Shapiro, Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma

    Galerie 3

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: What to do about talented but troublesome reporters

    Speaker: Jennifer Forsyth of The Wall Street Journal

    **Moderated by Jennifer Forsyth, The Wall Street Journal

    Editors and managers will get together to share notes and compare tips on dealing with investigative journalists who have tremendous skills but who also present management challenges. These types include those who alienate their sources or colleagues, who are overzealous in their conclusions, who refuse to embrace 21st century media or who fight every proposed edit to their work.

    Preservation Hall

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Thursday - #5 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Dave Savini of CBS/WBBM Chicago

    ****Moderated by Dave Savini, CBS/WBBM Chicago

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Thursday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Wednesday.

    Galerie 2

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Unleash the data: Tools and tricks for taming PDFs

    Speakers: Nils Mulvad of Kaas & Mulvad; Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters

    This class will cover basic approaches for getting text out of PDF documents using powerful and freely available tools. Participants will be introduced to basic concepts and walked-through tackling common challenges encountered with tricky PDF documents.

    This class is best for: People who are unfamiliar with the PDF to text tools or would like to learn how optical character recognition (OCR) tools can be used for extracting difficult text from images embedded in PDF documents.

    Salon B

    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Salon C

    5:30 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Reception

    Welcome reception

    Sponsored by The Advocate

    Kick off the conference with a welcome reception Thursday night at the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas (1 Canal St, New Orleans, LA 70130), beginning at 7 p.m.

    Meet up with friends you have not seen since last year and welcome new attendees. Light hors d' oeuvres will be served and each attendee will receive one drink ticket.

    See printed schedule for room information

    7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Preservation Booth, 2nd floor

    7:30 am - 6:15 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Friday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.  Sales will be located in Preservation Hall on the 2nd floor of the New Orleans Marriott.

    Preservation Hall

    7:30 am - 6:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Digging into data for stories: A crash course **pre-registered attendees only

    Even if you’ve never touched a spreadsheet, you will walk away from this day-long workshop able to use Excel for your next investigation. You’ll come away with plenty of story ideas and also learn about publicly available databases that you can download and analyze to produce great local stories.

    In this workshop, led by experienced IRE and NICAR trainers, we'll explore how to use Excel, a fairly simple but powerful spreadsheet application, to begin analyzing data for stories. We'll start from the beginning with basic formulas and work our way up to summarizing information using PivotTables and more. How do you think about data analysis as a journalist? How do you find the story within the columns and rows? Depending on the experience level of the group we may discuss advanced functions in Excel including data cleaning and more. 

    We'll walk through a number of searchable databases currently available online and show you how you can download information into a spreadsheet so you can start analyzing data as soon as you leave the workshop.

    No previous experience is required for this workshop. Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Computers will be provided for the training. **Attendees must be registered for the conference to attend this workshop.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Salon B

    9:00 am - 6:15 pm

  • Panel

    All about the analysis

    Speakers: Rob Barry of The Wall Street Journal; Crina Boros of independent journalist; Steven Rich of The Washington Post; Chrys Wu of Matchstrike LLC

    **Moderated by Chrys Wu, The New York Times

    We talk about interrogating the data, but exactly what does that mean? What questions should be we asking? How do we formulate those questions? What about running various analysis techniques that might surface "interesting" outliers in data? Or is the answer always "Apply the random forest classification technique"? Our panel of experienced data journalists will explore the intricacies of data analysis.

    Salon D

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Visuals - Making the story sing

    Speakers: Felipe Escamilla of NBC Bay Area; Anna Hewson of KUSA/9News Denver; Peter Hull of KXAS/NBC5 Dallas-Fort Worth; Evan Stulberger of WNBC New York City

    Turning an investigation into a visual video masterpiece isn't easy. Documents are dull, numbers are numbing, and talking heads are torture. This panel of expert storytellers will show you how they transform these bland elements into emotional and informative stories that really sing. You'll learn from the masters as they share their creative methods and tools. Their strategies will show you how to elevate the production value of your pieces, even with limited resources and looming deadlines. These are techniques that won’t just bring video-poor stories to life, but will transform them into clear, powerful pieces that connect with audiences.

    Galerie 3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Campaign 2016: Following the (dark) money (Sponsored by Rockefeller Brothers Fund)

    Speakers: Russ Choma of Mother Jones; Robert Maguire of Center for Responsive Politics; Fredreka Schouten of CNN; Michael Beckel of Issue One

    **Moderated by Michael Beckel, The Center for Public Integrity

    The 2016 election is expected to be the most expensive in history, and big-money political animals that don't disclose their funders are taking on new roles. Come learn about this proliferation of political "dark money" and a variety of backdoor ways you might be able to discern who’s behind these opaque political spenders. Get ready to dig into IRS reports, Federal Election Commission data, Department of Labor filings and corporate disclosures — as well as pound the pavement — to get answers.

    Galerie 4-5

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Ethnic media track the impact of hate speech in 2016 election (Sponsored by Ford Foundation and New America Media)

    Speakers: Anthony Advincula of New America Media; Minhaj Hasan of The Muslim Link; Chris King of St. Louis American; Juan Esparza Loera of Vida en el Valle; Jenise Morgan of Florida Courier; Joe Wei of World Journal

    **Moderated by Anthony Advincula, New America Media

    Hate speech and demonizing specific groups by public figures has become standard political discourse in the 2016 election campaign. Ethnic news organizations, serving several target populations, report on what they are doing to monitor the fallout in their communities and what they’re finding: Increased levels of intimidation and self-censorship, reports of micro-aggression, verbal and physical violence and strategies to fight back.

    Galerie 6

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Excel 1: Getting started with spreadsheets (repeat session)

    Speaker: Jamie Grey of InvestigateTV

    In this introduction to spreadsheets you'll begin analyzing data with Excel, a simple but powerful tool. You'll learn how to enter data, sort it, filter it and conduct simple calculations like sum, average and median.

    Prerequisites: None.

    Salon A

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Preservation Hall

    9:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Demo

    Finding the story: A data tour (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Mark Nichols of USA TODAY Network; Christopher Schnaars of USA TODAY Network; Russ Ptacek of independent journalist; Katy Stech Ferek of The Wall Street Journal; Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters

    **Moderated by Jaimi Dowdell, IRE/NICAR

    This session will highlight data sources you can mine to uncover stories in your community. Panelists will take a deep dive into bankruptcy, campaign finance, lottery and water data. Check out examples of stories others have done and see how you can put this data to work for yourself.

    Each panelist will be teaching a "Finding the data" hands-on class later in the conference where you can get experience working with the data yourself. The series of classes includes:

    Finding the story:Water

    Finding the story:Cracking the political piggy bank

    Finding the story: Digging up secrets and story ideas in bankruptcy court records

    Finding the story: Lottery scandals

    Finding the story: Bridges

    Galerie 1

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: What to do about dedicated but frustrating editors

    Speaker: Alison Young of Missouri School of Journalism

    **Moderated by Alison Young, USA TODAY NETWORK

    Reporters will get together to share strategies for pursuing watchdog and investigative stories while working for editors whose management styles can make the work more difficult. These types of editors include those who are unable to prioritize daily and enterprise workloads, as well as those who don't understand how investigative reporting is done. We'll also discuss strategies for dealing with editors who are micromanagers and overzealous rewriters, as well as those who try to push a story's conclusions beyond what the reporting shows. Bring your tips for how you've successfully managed challenging editor situations.

    Preservation Hall

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Robots that report: How fact-checkers worldwide are experimenting with automation

    Speakers: Bill Adair of Duke University; Alexios Mantzarlis of International Fact-Checking Network

    With small staffs and an ocean of false claims to verify, fact-checkers in France, the U.K., the U.S. and elsewhere are experimenting with automation in different stages of the fact-checking process. Tools have been built to find check-worthy claims, track false claims in the news and social media, automatically annotate false claims and pair them with fact checks published elsewhere. How far are we from a "holy grail" of entirely automated fact-checking? What can we do in the meantime? And how can developments in this field help investigative reporters in their work?

    Salon E

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Friday - #1 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Ramon Escobar of CNN Worldwide

    **Moderated by Ramon Escobar, CNN

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Friday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Thursday.

    Galerie 2

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Social media on the map

    Speaker: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR

    Social media + location = precision reporting. Filter the firehose of social media posts by location to focus like a laser on your city or region. Discover the latest apps, tools and tactics to pinpoint experts, witnesses, story angles, photos, videos and other material in a particular city or even near a specific address. Empowered with these tools, you will stay several steps ahead of your competitors, especially during breaking news.

    Salon F-H

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    The business of freelancing: Running a business (Sponsored by the Fund for Investigative Journalism and FIRE)

    Speakers: Katia Bachko of The Atavist Magazine​; Carlos Dada of independent journalist; Katie Townsend of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press; Lee van der Voo of independent journalist; Laird Townsend of Freelance Investigative Reporters and Editors (FIRE)

    **Moderated by Laird Townsend, Project Word

    This session will cover practical advice on how freelancers can remain economically viable in the public interest. From how to approach grant-raising, time management, tax strategy, and business structure; to how to think about contract, copyright, repurposing, and options. You’ll leave with the variables needed for success in starting a news site, how to save time in FOIA requests and avoid legal trouble.

    Studio 9-10

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Under pressure: Real life in real time with breaking news

    Speaker: Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area

    Come experience the real heart pounding excitement of a breaking news simulation where your investigative reporting and computer assisted reporting skills will be put through the ringer and to the test as teams compete to see who can break real, enterprise news in a minute by minute breaking news scenario. Sharpen your skills or learn new techniques to take back to your newsroom to help your team win the day the next time a big breaking news story happens in your backyard.See how good your skills really are. This class will teach you skills you can also use for everyday general assignment reporting/stories to take your career to the next level (not just breaking news.)

    Prerequisites: None. This class can be useful to anyone from novice beginners to experienced internet jockeys.

    Salon C

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    After Ferguson: What's next for reporting on policing in America?

    Speakers: Oliver Laughland of The Guardian; Wesley Lowery of The Washington Post; DeRay Mckesson of We The Protestors; Errin Haines Whack of The Associated Press

    Since Ferguson, national attention on police shootings and racial injustices has shifted all across the country, from Baltimore to Chicago, San Francisco, Cleveland, Louisiana, New Mexico, and beyond. Over the past two years, videos, social media, and news stories have brought a new level of scrutiny to police misconduct with fatal outcomes, legal systems that shield officers from accountability, and patchy federal oversight of such incidents. A panel of experts and journalists will look at how this beat has evolved since Ferguson, what those new to the beat should know, and what issues stand on the horizon—plus, story ideas therein.

    Salon D

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: What keeps your lawyer awake at night?

    Speakers: Chris Moeser of TEGNA Inc.; Laura Lee Prather of Haynes and Boone, LLP; Mary Ellen Roy of Phelps Dunbar LLP; Kevin Keeshan of NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations

    **Moderated by Kevin Keeshan, NBC Owned Television Stations

    What are the latest concerns from three of the leading media lawyers in the news business? Social media and the emphasis on digital storytelling have changed the way investigative stories are produced and presented. How does this affect the way the lawyers approach each story? And where do they see the hazards ahead? We'll hear about their concerns, and how journalists can be better prepared to deliver bulletproof investigations across multiple platforms.

    Galerie 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    David 1, Goliath 0: Fighting and winning open records battles

    Speakers: Jason Leopold of BuzzFeed News; Brandon Smith of independent journalist; Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Matt Topic of Loevy & Loevy

    **Moderated by Sarah Cohen, The New York Times

    Get the tools and inspiration you need to successfully fight for records. Jason Leopold, a self-described FOIA terrorist, will share his strategies and advice on how to wrangle information from recalcitrant officials. He'll be joined by Brandon Smith, the journalist who sued the city of Chicago to release the Laquan McDonald police shooting video, and Matt Topic, the attorney who worked with Smith.

    Salon E

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Excel 2: Functions and pivot tables (repeat session)

    Speaker: Ron Nixon of The Associated Press

    In this class you'll learn how to use formulas to analyze data with the eye of a journalist using calculations like change, percent change and rates. It will also focus on the power of pivot tables for analysis in minutes rather than hours.

    Prerequisites: This class will be most helpful if you’ve taken Excel 1 or have worked with a spreadsheet in the past.

    Salon A

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Management: Keep it together - Building and guiding a projects team

    Speakers: Scott Allen of The Boston Globe; Chris Davis of USA TODAY Network; Michael Siconolfi of The Wall Street Journal; David Fallis of The Washington Post

    **Moderated by David Fallis, The Washington Post

    Do you really need an investigative team of reporters? How do you identify and choose the right stories to pursue? How do you ensure that projects don’t drag on too long? And, how do you make sure there is a payoff in the end? This panel will tackle these and many other challenges that investigative editors face in newsrooms today.

     

    Galerie 4-5

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: The Southern Girls Project

    Speakers: Elizabeth Hoekenga of AL.com; Connor Sheets of AL.com; Diana Samuels of The Times-Picayune, NOLA.com

    From obesity to educational-inequity to abortion access to Title IX, so many of our nation’s most pressing issues come to land at the feet of girls in the American Deep South. Yet these very voices are wildly under-represented in today’s media. Who talks to girls? More importantly – who listens?

    In a new, open-source Southern Girls Project, journalists across the south are joining with girls, and their advocates, to dive deeper and learn more, examining the issues of the modern south through the eyes of girls from birth to 17 — from generational wealth and crushing poverty, insularity, religion, and the digital divide — and digging into stories too often overlooked.

    This session will offer an overview of the project, seek feedback, and explain how news organizations and independent journalists can play a part. The project, stemming from AL.com’s Alabama Investigative Journalism Lab, includes partners from NOLA.com, Mississippi Press, freelance journalists, researchers and girls across the south.

    We’re looking for data journalists, reporters, video storytellers, social media experts and all journalists who believe that listening to, and reporting with, an audience makes for better stories.

    Preservation Hall

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Quick and easy analysis without importing: csvkit!

    Speaker: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    Sometimes you just want to ask your data a few questions before you start the process of importing it: How big is it? What's in it? If you have a text or csv file, csvkit can help you do this before you even open the file. It's simple and easy if you're not afraid to dive into the command line.

    Salon C

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Rising waters: Investigating the impact of storms and the shrinking coast

    Speakers: Deborah Nelson of University of Maryland; Neena Satija of The Texas Tribune; Mark Schleifstein of The Times-Picayune, NOLA.com; Steven Beatty of LION Publishers

    **Moderated by Steve Beatty, The Lens

    Unless you're an intrepid eco-tourist, you're not likely to see what passes for a coastline in Louisiana. Likewise, casual visitors don't frequent the Houston Ship Channel. And many marshy inlets of Chesapeake Bay are known only to dedicated crabbers.  But activity in each place affects the lives of millions not far inland. Panelists will talk about getting the information that matters most to your audience, and how best to make it accessible, relevant and compelling.   

     

    Galerie 6

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Rolling your own data

    Speakers: Robert Gebeloff of The New York Times; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Sarah Ryley of The Trace

    Sometimes there's a government database to FOIA. But often the best data for a story doesn't exist in database format. It's a collection of documents, or statistical tables trapped in PDF files. We'll show you examples of stories that were powered by data created from scratch, and provide tips for how to go about such a project.

    Studio 9-10

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Security: Bulletproofing the digital newsroom

    Speakers: Jorge Luis Sierra of Border Center for Journalists and Bloggers; Mike Tigas of ProPublica

    Learn what investigative journalists and their newsrooms can do to protect their information and communications' integrity from cyber attacks, espionage and eavesdropping launched by corrupt governments, criminal organizations or a combination of both. These skills and tools are a must to learn for digital newsrooms that rely on the internet and mobile phones to work.

    Salon F-H

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Friday - #2 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Ramon Escobar of CNN Worldwide

    **Moderated by Ramon Escobar, CNN

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Friday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Thursday.

    Galerie 2

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    When Excel isn't enough (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Thomas Thoren of Independent

    Excel is a great tool for most jobs, but it has its limitations. Large files can mean long wait times and it can be difficult to understand and reproduce old work. Databases, however, are faster and powerful enough to handle large amounts of data. And with SQL, you can easily document and reproduce your data analysis which means you’ll be ready to quickly recreate a Census data analysis when new data is released.

    You won’t leave this session a database expert, but you will understand the benefits of databases and have a strong footing for getting started with SQL.

    Galerie 1

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Breaking news investigations

    Speakers: Richard Pienciak of The Associated Press; Laura Smitherman of The Baltimore Sun; Andrew Donohue of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Jenna Russell of The Boston Globe

    **Moderated by Andy Donohue, Reveal/CIR

    Salon E

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: How to get people to talk

    Speakers: Cindy Galli of ABC News; Dina Gusovsky of CNBC; Scott Zamost of CNBC

    It sounds impossible -- key subjects in your story won’t go on camera. But there are proven techniques to change their mind. From scammers to sex offenders, two network producers and a correspondent share what works to land sit-down interviews with the people least likely to talk.

    Galerie 3

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Water

    Speaker: Mark Nichols of USA TODAY Network

    Need some data support for stories that involve the water we drink and public systems that supply water? Look no further than the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). USA TODAY’s Mark Nichols gives you a guided tour of the website that houses data for more than 155,000 public water systems across the U.S. and its territories, and shows you strengths and weaknesses of SDWIS data, based on personal experiences.

    Salon A

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Investigations with DocumentCloud

    Speakers: Ted Han of DocumentCloud; Justin Reese of DocumentCloud; Lauren Grandestaff of IRE and NICAR

    Get a hands-on tour of DocumentCloud and how to make the most of its search, annotation, collaboration and publishing tools for your next investigation. Plus, we'll offer up great examples of DocumentCloud in action in recent investigative reports and newsroom tools.

    Salon C

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Mobile is now: Transforming newsrooms for the age of the smartphone

    Speaker: David Ho of The Wall Street Journal

    Mobile is not a platform. Mobile is THE platform. If your newsroom is not embracing mobile, you're behind. Learn to catch up and race ahead with best practices from David Ho, The Wall Street Journal's executive mobile editor. He will talk about WSJ's mobile approach and current focus on putting mobile at the center of the newsroom. Ho, the world's most experienced mobile and tablet editor, will also offer tips and advice for news organizations of all sizes on how to succeed in a world where the dominant news source is in your pocket.

    Studio 9-10

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: Julia - One language to rule them all

    Speaker: Daniel Lathrop of University of Iowa

    **Moderated by Daniel Lathrop, University of Iowa

    If you follow the buzz on emerging programming languages, the Julia scientific programming language is all the rage. Importantly for data journalists, it is a statistically oriented language with the ability to easily use existing libraries for R, Python, C and even Java.

    Preservation Hall

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Political advertising: How to unlock new insights from a fresh treasure trove of data

    Speakers: Robert Maguire of Center for Responsive Politics; Aaron Sharockman of PolitiFact; Nancy Watzman of Internet Archive

    In an increasingly chaotic and fractious political season that promises to offer the largest volume of ads ever seen in US history, the new Political TV Ad Archive — powered by the Internet Archive— is preserving ads online and making underlying metadata on airings, sponsors, and more available to journalists. Come hear from the Internet Archive, along with journalism and fact-checking partners who are using the data in novel ways, to find out how to make the most of this resource. The project is funded via the Knight News Challenge.

    Galerie 6

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Revealing the cost of corporate welfare

    Speakers: Greg LeRoy of Good Jobs First; Sarita Nair of New Mexico Office of the State Auditor; Hilary Russ of Thomson Reuters

    An obscure new government-accounting rule covering budgets from calendar 2016 and beyond will require states and most cities, counties and school districts to report how much revenue they lose to economic development tax breaks. Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 77 will enable big-picture and comparative analyses never before possible. From an activist who helped win the rule, a state official overseeing the rule's implementation, and veteran GASB reporter, learn how the Statement works, where the data will reside, who else is watching, and what the data could reveal. For reporters covering public budget issues, Statement No. 77 is likely to prove an investigative gold mine.

    Galerie 4-5

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Seafood from Slaves: The story behind an IRE Medal winner

    Speaker: Mary Rajkumar of The Associated Press

    Learn how a team of reporters from The Associated Press launched an investigation that helped free more than 2,000 enslaved workers. Reporter Martha Mendoza and editor Mary Rajkumar will offer insights into how journalists can use documents, data and sourcing to uncover similar abuses.

    Salon D

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Friday - #3 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Steven Ackermann of Raycom Media

    **Moderated by Steven Ackermann, Raycom Media

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Friday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Thursday.

    Galerie 2

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    The evolution of data journalism education (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University

    Galerie 1

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Turning your investigation into: A podcast

    Speakers: Gina Barton of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Nikole Hannah-Jones of The New York Times Magazine; Bill Rankin of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Sarah Hutchins of IRE and NICAR

    You don't have to work for a radio station to be part of the growing podcast movement. Whether you're interested in launching a multi-part series or producing a single episode, this session will help you learn how to turn your investigation into a compelling audio story. Learn from the journalists behind The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's "Breakdown" podcast and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's "Unsolved." We'll cover all the basics: deciding when a story deserves the podcast treatment, pitching it to editors, producing your story, and finding an audience.

    Salon F-H

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Media lawyers brown bag

    Does your investigation contain complex legal questions? Unsure of how to proceed? During the media lawyers brown bag, between 12:45 and 2 p.m. on Friday, June 17, bring your lunch and your questions for a personal discussion with some prominent media law experts that will be presenting throughout the 2016 IRE Conference. We'll provide drinks and dessert.

    Galerie 6

    12:45 pm - 2:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced OpenRefine: Using regular expressions

    Speaker: Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    This class will cover using some of the advanced regular expressions and cleaning techniques available in OpenRefine.

    The session is best for: people who have used OpenRefine or its predecessor, Google Refine, for simple data cleaning tasks such as faceting, simple clustering, and common transformations.

    Salon C

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast deep dives 2 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speakers: Daffodil Altan of Investigative Reporting Program; Andres Cediel of Investigative Reporting Program; Matthew Glasser of NBC Boston; Joel Grover of NBC4 Los Angeles; Harry Hairston of NBC10 Philadelphia

    Galerie 2

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Hoaxes, con men & frauds

    Speakers: Tony Kovaleski of KMGH-Denver; Ira Rosen of 60 Minutes; Matthew Mosk of ABC News

    Reporters are a target for phony documents and sources more often than you think. How do you spot the fakes? Hear cautionary tales from the field in this session.

    Galerie 3

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Constructing the narrative: An unbelievable story of rape

    Speakers: Ken Armstrong of ProPublica; T. Christian Miller of ProPublica

    Want to turn an investigation into a 12,000-word story without a nut graph? Then this is the panel for you. We’ll share lessons from the Pulitzer Prize-winning “An Unbelievable Story of Rape,” a dual-track narrative that broke with convention while exemplifying the benefits of two writers and two news organizations partnering up. We’ll talk about suspense, voice, shifts in perspective, jumps in time, and layers of reveal. We'll also offer tips on how to report a story in a way that will allow you to tell it cinematically.

    Salon F-H

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to SQL

    Speaker: Thomas Thoren of Independent

    Learning to manipulate data is a bit like learning a new language. Actually, it is a language, called structured query language (SQL). This session is an introduction to using SQL to zero in on your data by viewing slices and chunks of it and putting it into a useful order so you can spot the stuff you need to get started toward a story. We'll use the (free) database manager SQLite for this class.

    This session will be most useful if: You have some experience working with data in columns and rows, in spreadsheets or database managers.

    Salon A

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Involving your audience in your investigation

    Speakers: Robert Benincasa of NPR; Michelle Holmes of AL.com; Dave Maass of Electronic Frontier Foundation; Shawn McIntosh of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    **Moderated by Shawn McIntosh, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Readers and viewers can become key players in your investigation, informing and enriching work conducted by newsroom journalists. This panel will cover best practices in tapping the wisdom of crowds, including systems to encourage and vet tips, using audience to collect and review public records, crowdsourcing key pieces of stories and building communities of influencers who will help verify your work, build its credibility and even distribute it.

    Studio 9-10

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Management: Making newsroom partnerships work

    Speakers: Kirsten Danis of The New York Times; Ken Foskett of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Lorie Hearn of inewsource; Mark Greenblatt of Scripps Washington Bureau

    **Moderated by Mark Greenblatt, Scripps Washington Bureau

    The Perils, Pitfalls and Major Payoffs of Partnerships: Hear advice from seasoned veterans on how to establish buy-in from newsrooms with similar goals yet different distribution platforms, how to build trust among the reporting partners and how to negotiate and work through the problems that are certain to arise. What makes partnerships great? What dooms them to failure? Learn how to pick the right story, the right partner, and how doing so might benefit everyone.

    Salon D

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Mastering the investigative interview: Questioning the way you take on your targets

    Speaker: Julian Sher of Investigative Journalist

    We do them every day, often without thinking. Maybe that’s the problem – even as pros we make basic mistakes in interviews because we are not thinking strategically and tactically. Politicians, businesspeople and PR flacks are experts at jumping on the smallest opening we give them, the tiniest mistake in formulating a question. It’s not just about getting the facts out – it’s about how to dramatically rethink the way you approach interviews, how to master the basic rules of tough interviews, and then learn how to break them when needed.

    Julian Sher is the senior producer of CBC TV's the fifth estate, Canada's premier investigative TV program and the author of six books. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, the Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail. More at www.juliansher.com.

    Galerie 6

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: Civility and freedom of speech

    Speaker: Lynn Walsh of Trusting News project

    **Moderated by Lynn Walsh, Society of Professional Journalists

    Are we becoming too PC and sensitive? Is this impacting how we cover issues and produce news content? Join the discussion as we tackle story pitches, how we interview story subjects, and more.

    Preservation Hall

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Research gumbo

    Speakers: Barbara Gray of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism; Margot Williams of The Intercept

    Investigative reporters will be served a stew of the latest tools and tricks for public records research, online privacy, advanced search techniques, alerting services and personal web caching and archiving.

    Galerie 4-5

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Uncovering stories on the business beat (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Pat Beall of The Palm Beach Post; Dakin Campbell of Bloomberg News; Michael Grabell of ProPublica; Will Sutton of Sutton Solutions

    **Moderated by Will Sutton, Grambling State University

    No matter what beat you cover, business and finance are increasingly becoming key areas to understand and mine. Get story ideas and advice on how to track down information from essential topics, from banking and finance to worker's issues and consumer protection.

    Salon E

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Demo

    Web scraping without programming (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Steve Reilly of USA TODAY Network

    The web is full of valuable data and documents hidden in hard-to-reach places. In this session, we’ll go over free tools and techniques you can use to extract structured data from websites and get it into a usable format without writing a single line of code.

     

    Galerie 1

    2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Rolling investigations

    Speakers: Tisha Thompson of ESPN; Phil Williams of WTVF-Nashville; Lee Zurik of WVUE-New Orleans

    No one has the luxury of disappearing from the air for six months - or three (or even one). That doesn't mean we cannot do long-term investigations. These veteran investigative reporters will discuss how they've done long-term investigations -- one story at a time.

    Galerie 3

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Digging deeper with SQL: Grouping and summing

    Speaker: T. Christian Miller of ProPublica

    This SQLite workshop will build up your SQL muscles, adding some common tasks that journalists need every day: checking for missing data, grouping your data, getting counts and sums and doing math in SQL.

    Prerequisites: It is recommended that you take 'Intro to SQL: Interrogating data' or have some familiarity with SQL.

    Salon A

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Excel tricks

    Speaker: Meghan Hoyer of The Associated Press

    Learn about various tools and functions in Excel that come in handy when you need to re-structure or otherwise get your data ready for analysis. We'll cover string functions, logical functions, date functions, merging data using lookup functions, and perhaps a few other nifty tricks if time allows. This is a fast-paced class intended to introduce you to these tools, not master them. But you'll walk out with practice data and a 20-page tipsheet from MaryJo Webster that covers, in detail, everything we do in class, plus other great Excel tips.

    Recommended for: anyone feeling comfortable with basic Excel functions and formulas.

    Salon C

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Demo

    How graph databases can help uncover wrongdoing (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Mar Cabra of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; William Lyon of Neo4j

    Answering the question of “who is connected to whom?” is crucial to any investigation. Criminals, tax evaders, drug traffickers... they all work in networks. Graph databases can help you make sense of these networks and easily visualize the connections. Learn how the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists turned documents into a public database of secretive offshore companies and how you can use Neo4j and graph databases to make sense of connected data and find hidden stories.

    Galerie 1

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating child mistreatment

    Speakers: Jenifer McKim of New England Center for Investigative Reporting; Greg Smith of New York Daily News; Duff Wilson of Reuters; Kathleen Johnston of Indiana University

    **Moderated by Kathleen Johnston, CBS News

    Stories about troubled children -- from babies born with drug addictions to youths abused and neglected in licensed childcare facilities or at home under the watch of social workers -- often are hidden under a veil of secrecy and shielded by convoluted confidentiality laws. Reporters from the NY Daily News, Reuters and the New England Center for Investigative Reporting provide useful tips on how to access hard-to-find information using state and federal public disclosure laws as well as report and write impact-driven stories with the help of often vulnerable sources and innovative storytelling techniques. These investigations can have direct and tangible impacts on laws and policies.  

     

    Studio 9-10

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Management: Culture change - Steering your newsroom into the multiplatform world

    Speakers: Stephen Engelberg of ProPublica; Lawan Hamilton of Scripps Washington Bureau; Robert Rosenthal; David Boardman of Temple University

    **Moderated by David Boardman, Temple University

    Leading any newsroom — especially a legacy newsroom — through the cultural, technical and workflow changes necessary to be a true multiplatform organization is a challenge. But the result can be powerful journalism that has far more impact. Three veteran news leaders discuss how they have led the charge, and share some of the most dramatic results.

    Salon E

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Navigating legal minefields in the source-journalist relationship

    Speakers: Mark MacDougall of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, LLP; Karen Williams of Cozen O'Connor; David Schertler of Schertler & Onorato, LLP; Michael Isikoff of Yahoo News

    **Moderated by Michael Isikoff, Yahoo News

    Sources who help expose corruption or misconduct sometimes violate the law by taking evidence that is not their property. But what about the source who is breaking the law in real-time or who tells a journalist about the crimes that she plans to commit? What can a journalist do to protect a source who is keeping classified information on a home computer - and the journalist will shortly publish a story that will focus law enforcement attention directly on the source? What if the crime goes beyond just spiriting documents out of the office and involves more serious offenses – and the journalist know about it? Other real-life episodes to be considered include: Dealing with sources who proffer classified information, sources who secretly (but unlawfully) record telephone calls or intercept other communications, the risks involved when a source is also a computer hacker, and little-known tools that can be used to protect anonymous sources. This session will focus on how the law treats these cases and what can be done by journalists to protect themselves and their sources from criminal exposure - and still get the story.

    Salon F-H

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Networking: Getting plugged into journalism around the world

    Speakers: Alejandro González of 14ymedio; Carlos Eduardo Huertas of CONNECTAS; David Lemayian of Code for Africa; Rana Sabbagh of Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism (ARIJ); Amanda Strydom of African Network of Centers for Investigative Reporting (ANCIR); Drew Sullivan of Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project; David Kaplan of Glob

    **Moderated by David Kaplan, Global Investigative Journalism Network

    It’s a networked world, and your stories are bound to lead overseas at some point. You’ll need sources, friends, and colleagues, so here’s where to start: we’ve brought together journalists from leading investigative reporting networks in Africa, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East, plus a special guest from Cuba. We’ll show you how to get connected and how to follow trails of money and people from your local community to the farthest reaches of the planet. We've got better tools and stronger networks than ever before, so come meet these extraordinary journalists who serve as bridges linking reporters worldwide.

    Galerie 4-5

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: Trolls, predatory lending and resegregation: Exploring Livingston Award winning stories with the Knight Foundation

    Speaker: Jennifer Preston of Knight Foundation

    **Moderated by Jennifer Preston, Knight Foundation

    Meet the 2016 winners of The Livingston Awards for Young Journalists who will describe how they produced award-winning investigative reporting using data, unusual cross-country partnerships and a trip to Russia to find the trolls wrecking the Internet.

    Speakers on this panel include:

    • *Lisa Gartner, Michael LaForgia and Nathaniel Lash, Tampa Bay Times
    • *Michael Baker, The Seattle Times
    • *Daniel Wagner, BuzzFeed

     

    Preservation Hall

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Reporting on guns

    Speakers: Lois Beckett of The Guardian; Ben Hallman of ICIJ; Mike McLively of Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence; Matt Drange of The Information; Jonathan Bullington of The Times-Picayune, NOLA.com

    **Moderated by Matt Drange, Forbes

    With more guns than people in the U.S., you’d think there would be an army of journalists covering every aspect of guns, from gun violence to the business of guns to gun policy and everything in between. The reality is, there are precious few journalism resources dedicated to consistent coverage of guns. Most newsrooms only get involved when there’s a mass shooting. Come hear from some of the best in the business as we talk about how to cover guns and highlight recent in-depth reporting on them. We aim to send you back to your newsroom with story ideas you can execute right away, along with resources you can use for the long haul.

    Salon D

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Friday - #4 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Al Tompkins of Poynter

    **Moderated by Al Tompkins, Poynter

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Friday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Thursday.

    Galerie 2

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Panel

    Turning your investigation into: A play

    Speakers: Mike McGraw of Kansas City Public Television (KCPT); Jennifer Welch of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Michelle T. Johnson of playwright; Andrew Donohue of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

    **Moderated by Andy Donohue, Reveal/CIR

    You take a real-life investigation, full of real characters, complications and controversies, and you it turn into live theater. In this session, we'll explore how journalists, playwrights, producers, actors and, of course, lawyers, can work together to not only tell a story in a new way, but explore new angles and breathe fresh life into important stories.

    Galerie 6

    3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Fundamentals of Neo4j graph database for data analysis

    Speaker: William Lyon of Neo4j

    Graph databases have been used to make sense of data for stories such as the Panama Papers and analyzing FEC campaign contributions. Being able to model and query data as a graph enables us to draw insights from highly connected data such as email records, leaked documents, and public data.

    In this hands on session we will introduce you to the Neo4j graph database, including:

    - An overview of the property graph data model and how to model data as a graph

    - A comparison of the property graph to other data models and database systems

    - How to load datasets into Neo4j from public web APIs

    - How to query Neo4j using Cypher, the query language for graphs

    - How to use graph visualization tools to explore and draw insight from the data

    This hands-on session is intended for those familiar with basic database concepts and who have at least some experience working with a database (such as writing SQL queries).

    Salon C

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Joining data with SQL

    Speaker: Ronald Campbell of NBC Owned Television Stations

    Salon A

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Friday - #5 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Al Tompkins of Poynter

    **Moderated by Al Tompkins, Poynter

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Friday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Thursday.

    Galerie 2

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Panel

    Showcase: From investigation to movie, behind the scenes of Spotlight

    Speakers: Martin Baron of The Washington Post; Blye Faust of Participant Media; Sacha Pfeiffer of WBUR, NPR; Mike Rezendes of independent journalist; Walter Robinson of The Boston Globe; Josh Singer of screenwriter; Stephen Engelberg of ProPublica

    **Moderated by Stephen Engelberg, ProPublica

    Go behind the scenes with the investigation and movie that showed the public what the work of investigative reporting is really like, and the impact it can have. Members of the Globe Spotlight team who worked on the Catholic Church investigation, and Martin Baron, who was the paper's editor at the time, are joined by two members of the team that made the film, screenwriter Josh Singer and producer Blye Pagon Faust. And stick around for the announcement of the winner of a $100,000 fellowship to work on an investigative project with the current Globe Spotlight team. Immediately following this session, candidates for the IRE Board will make short statements to help you make your choice before you vote.

    Salon D-E

    5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Board candidate speeches

    Meet the candidates for the IRE Board of Directors on Friday at 6:15 p.m. in Salon D-E following the Showcase Panel. Learn more about the candidates and election.

    Salon D-E

    6:15 pm - 6:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Preservation Booth, 2nd floor

    8:00 am - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Saturday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.  Sales will be located in Preservation Hall on the 2nd floor of the New Orleans Marriott.

    Preservation Hall

    8:00 am - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Coding for journalists (pre-registered attendees only)

    Speaker: Alex Richards of NerdWallet

    Over the course of two half-day sessions, this workshop will cover the ways basic programming in Python can collect data for stories from the web, assist with some repetitive tasks you've probably been doing by hand and generally speed up your reporting. This hands-on training will cover the fundamental coding concepts and libraries you need to know about, as well as how to apply them to your own stories.

    This course is designed for coding beginners who already have some experience with spreadsheets, SQL, the computer command line and basic HTML. You will need to attend both parts of the workshop (Saturday and Sunday mornings from 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.). Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training. **Attendees must be registered for the conference to attend this workshop.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    Salon C

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Audio class with Reveal

    Wondering how to turn your stories into driveway moments and compelling audio narrative? Then come to an intensive three hour workshop with award winning radio journalists from Reveal, the investigative news program from The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX.

    We will explore the power of audio narrative, how to plan for your radio field gathering to get the most from your interaction with your sources, how to interview for good narrative, and how to build scenes and emotion into your writing. We will discuss different formats used in radio and audio work.

    The field is exploding, so whether you're interested in becoming a collaborator of Reveal, a television journalist experimenting with other platforms, or a multimedia storyteller-this workshop will be hands -on training and development. It will be followed by a panel discussion of best practices.

    Galerie 6

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Feeding the beast

    Speakers: Amy Corral of NBC4 Los Angeles; Randy Mac of NBC4 Los Angeles; Scott MacFarlane of NBC4 Washington; Aaron Diamant of WSB-Atlanta

    NBC4 Los Angeles I-Team Consumer Investigator Randy Mac and Consumer Producer Amy Corral teamed up for the first time in October 2014 – and hit the ground running, delivering close to 90 stories over the next year and a half.  In the age of limited news resources, generating that much content is challenging, but with a little creative strategizing, it’s certainly possible. Randy and Amy will share their seven secrets to “Feeding the [Consumer] Beast.”

     

    Galerie 3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Designing database applications to increase page views and ad revenues (Hosted by Caspio)

    Speaker: Edward Garcia of Caspio, Inc.

    With journalists facing increasing pressure to create data interactives that engage more readers, it’s important to optimize data-driven applications for interactivity, traffic, and page views. Learn how to design and deploy revenue-generating applications that will continue to serve as long-lasting data assets. This demo will showcase real-world examples and techniques for building “share-worthy” hyper-local applications. Technologies covered: Caspio, Google maps, AJAX, location proximity, CDN, data feeds, SEO, and cross-channel deployment (web, mobile and social).

    Note: Pre-registration is not required, but is recommended to receive your free Caspio account pre-loaded with demo apps for the session. Register

    This session is good for: Everyone.

    Salon A

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Preservation Hall

    9:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Cracking the political piggy bank

    Speaker: Christopher Schnaars of USA TODAY Network

    In this hands-on class, you will learn how to find and download real-time campaign-finance data from the Sunlight Foundation and analyze it in Excel to find local stories on deadline. We also will spend some time with the Federal Election Commission's new beta website, use the FEC's candidate and committee viewer to find reports and discuss where the golden nuggets are buried.

    Prerequisites: A basic working knowledge of Excel is helpful but not necessary. Most of the Excel work will involve sorting and filtering, which we'll cover in class.

    Salon B

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    How to investigate the war on women's health

    Speakers: Hannah Levintova of Mother Jones; Nina Martin of ProPublica; Molly Redden of The Guardian; Marianne Szegedy-Maszak of Mother Jones

    **Moderated by Marianne Szegedy-Maszak, Mother Jones

    In the first quarter of 2016, state lawmakers introduced more than 1,000 restrictions on sexual and reproductive health—more than 400 related to abortion alone. This election season, this conflict will rage on and will touch millions of lives. That's why this realm is ripe for investigative reporting. A panel of reporters and editors who cover this beat will offer advice on how to dig deeper on reproductive rights. They'll discuss intersections with other beats, the unique challenges of interviewing sources on either side of a stark ideological divide, and best practices for researching the major players involved—the donors, lobbyists, scientists, and politicians.

    Salon E

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Investigating billionaires

    Speakers: Monika Bauerlein of Mother Jones; Lowell Bergman of Investigative Reporting Program; Stephanie Grimes of independent journalist; Tim O'Brien of Bloomberg View; Reg Chua of Reuters

    **Moderated by Reg Chua, Reuters

    Peter Thiel bankrolling Hulk Hogan’s case against Gawker has thrown the issue into sharp relief: What happens when people of limitless wealth are offended by journalism, and decide to fight back? Each of the journalists on this panel has had a personal brush with covering the 0.0001 percent—from Timothy O’Brien, sued by Donald Trump for revealing that Trump is not actually a billionaire, to Stephanie Grimes, who was let go by Sheldon Adelson’s Las Vegas Review-Journal after live-tweeting newsroom debates over the casino tycoon’s takeover. Mother Jones’ Bauerlein was personally sued by Idaho billionaire Frank Vandersloot over her newsroom’s coverage of his political activism; Bergman and Ross have spent their entire careers fighting off wealthy, litigious subjects. As the uberwealthy take to the courts as a way to punish inconvenient coverage, can the press keep fighting back?

    Galerie 4-5

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Jaw-droppingly cool online tools and apps that journalists love (Sponsored by TEGNA, Inc.)

    Speaker: Al Tompkins of Poynter

    This session is part tent revival, part journalism party.

    Poynter’s Al Tompkins will show you how to turn your phone into a sort of Swiss Army knife of tools for your journalism.

    You will:

    -learn how to capture interactive photos
    -learn how to make videos interactive so the user can hover over the image and data and links pop out
    -learn to quickly build a photo slideshow with graphics
    -build custom beautiful graphics without any design skills -see how to turn online text into interactive multimedia text for free
    -build before and after sliders in 30 seconds

    Everything you learn you will be able to accomplish in two minutes or less with no coding skills. And best yet, everything Al shows you will be free.

    Bring your iPhone or iPad fully charged and connected to the wireless system and be ready to go. We will do tons of hands on work live in this session.

    Salon D

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    New tools for political investigative reporting: The Background Machine and The Legislative Influence Detector (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Kat Duffy of Sunlight Foundation; Justin Price of The Arizona Republic; Evan Wyloge of The Desert Sun; Joe Walsh of The University of Chicago; Brandon Quester of inewsource

    From engaging the public with background checks on public officials to programmatically identifying model bills in state legislatures, this session will focus on new tools you can use to bring greater accountability to the political process. The Background Machine is an open-source tool that uses crowd-funding and tips to organize and pay for deep checks on political candidates. The Legislative Influence Detector is a powerful tool using an algorithm to identify similar or identical phrases in legislation, comparing bills introduced throughout the United States. And what’s best, we’re giving away what we’ve developed. With just a list of candidates, you can start using The Background Machine in your newsroom for this election, and by changing just a few lines of AZCIR’s LID python code, you can start finding model legislation introduced in your state.

     

    Galerie 1

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: The good, bad & the ugly parts of newsrooom on-boarding processes (and how can we make them better)

    Speaker: Sandhya Kambhampati of Los Angeles Times

    **Moderated by Sandhya Kambhampati, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews fellow

    Knight-Mozilla OpenNews fellow, Sandhya, wants to hear about how your newsroom is dealing with institutional knowledge that is lost when a person leaves your newsroom. Let's have a discussion about how we can work through ways to make these processes more efficient and useful for the future. You can also take her survey: bit.ly/newsroomonboarding

    Preservation Hall

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Protecting kids: Accessing child welfare records

    Speakers: Sarah Butrymowicz of The Hechinger Report; John Ferrugia of Rocky Mountain PBS; Clark Fouraker of WCBS-New York

    This panel will give you examples of how to investigate child welfare and services cases when much of the material involved is not open to the public. John Ferrugia will give you tips on how to track down these closed records through interested parties in the case who have reason to help you. Ferrugia will show you where and how to find a history of abuse and whether the agency is covering up its mistakes. Clark Fouraker will help you understand your rights in attending hearings that some states will tell you are closed. And, he’ll lead you to other agencies who have files and information that can help give you what you need to investigate child deaths -- files you can’t get from the human services agencies. Sarah Butrymowicz will tell you what records to request when looking at state licensed day care centers, what data is important, and how to interpret it to find out if the state is holding the private centers to minimum standards of care and monitoring. Her findings on abuse of children and lack of fines and accountability are stunning.

    Salon F-H

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Saturday - #1 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Lea Thompson of independent journalist

    **Moderated by Lea Thompson

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Saturday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Friday.

    Galerie 2

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Turning your investigation into: A book

    Speakers: Ronnie Greene of Reuters; Nancy Stancill of independent journalist; Mike Stanton of University of Connecticut; Josh Meyer of POLITICO

    **Moderated by Josh Meyer, NBC News

    Non-fiction book writing is a creatively satisfying (and sometimes lucrative) way of taking your investigative project to the next level, and to a potentially global audience. It ‘s a great way to make use of all that research and reporting you did for your project that didn’t “make it in.” And it’s one of the last bastions of in-depth investigative reporting, especially for those not still working for large mainstream media outlets. Even though bookstores are closing, there are many exciting opportunities on publishing’s digital frontier. These published author/journalists share their best advice, and offer lessons learned and cautionary tales.

    Studio 9-10

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: 60 stories in 60 minutes

    Speakers: Joe Ellis of KVUE/ABC Austin; Jennifer Cobb of KHOU-Houston

    Two of the top investigative producers in the business share 60 broadcast stories from investigative reporters across the country that can be done in any market. You’ll walk away with a tipsheet full of ideas sure to help keep your investigative story pipeline full. Get there early to grab a seat as this panel is not to be missed!

    Galerie 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Campaign 2016: Covering state and local elections (Sponsored by Rockefeller Brothers Fund)

    Speakers: Denise Roth Barber of National Institute on Money in State Politics; David Washburn of Voice of OC; Melissa Yeager of Sunlight Foundation; Denise Malan of IRE and NICAR

    **Moderated by Denise Malan, IRE/INN

    State and local elections often receive little attention but are rich with potential stories and investigations - if you know how to follow the money. Panelists will cover why more money is expected to funnel into state and local elections this cycle, how dark money is making its way into local campaigns, the basics of tracking straw donors in local campaigns, and ways to identify who is behind different ads being broadcast in your area.

    Galerie 4-5

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Educators: Guiding students on controversial campus investigations

    Speakers: David Armstrong of Georgia News Lab; Karl Idsvoog of Kent State University; Dee J. Hall of Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism; Gary Putka of New England Center for Investigative Reporting

    **Moderated by Dee J. Hall, Wisconsin Center for Investigative Reporting

    Investigations are always tough, but doing an investigation that is critical of campus administration, faculty or staff can lead to attacks and conflict and even threats of shutting down a student newsroom, a class or a faculty member. This session will look at how to navigate the perils of these kind of inquiries.

    Studio 9-10

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Digging up secrets and story ideas in bankruptcy court records (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speaker: Katy Stech Ferek of The Wall Street Journal

    Expand your reporting into bankruptcy court filings, where journalists can uncover how businesses and people ended up in financial trouble, key details like a bankrupt person’s salary or monthly mortgage payment amount and sources (suppliers, lawyers) who can help round out a story’s truths. Learn which Pacer imitator websites work best for following unfolding cases, finding story ideas or digging up otherwise secret information, such as legal settlements or vendor contracts.

    This session will be most useful if you have a PACER account, log-in and password. Attendees without a PACER account are welcome to attend this session to see a demonstration.

    Salon B

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Getting started with R

    Speakers: Ryan Menezes of Los Angeles Times; Christine Zhang of Baltimore Sun

    Add statistical heft to your reporting by using R, a free, powerful open-source programming language. This session will tackle the basics of R while exploring New Orleans census data. In addition to learning more about IRE's host city, you'll be importing data, installing packages, working with variables, and sorting and organizing your data.

    This session is good for: People comfortable working with code, people with basic data knowledge.

    Salon A

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Looking out for your audience: From scams to ripoffs to wrongdoing

    Speakers: Lee Rood of The Des Moines Register; Raquel Rutledge of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Julie Watts of KPIX-San Francisco; Mc Nelly Torres of independent journalist

    **Moderated by Mc Nelly Torres, NBC6 Miami

    Consumer investigations always hit a nerve: People lose money, their dignity and sometimes they get hurt. In this session, you'll learn how to find the document trail scam artists leave behind and how to use readers, viewers and authorities to get results.

    Salon E

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Management: Why won't you just do what I want? Fixing the reporter-editor relationship

    Speakers: Matt Apuzzo of The New York Times; Brett Blackledge of Naples Daily News; Amy Fiscus of The New York Times; Adam Goldman of The New York Times

    As an editor, how do you bring out the best in your reporters? As a reporter, how do you become the one who repeatedly gets the best assignments? Most importantly, how do you keep from strangling each other in the process? Hear practical tips from top reporters and editors about what the other side wants, and how to manage this crucial relationship to keep you both fulfilled.

    Salon F-H

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: Meet and greet - Accessing closed religious communities

    Speaker: Hans Peter Blicher of TV2 Nyhederne (Denmark)

    **Moderated by Hans Peter Blicher, TV2 Denmark

    What goes on inside conservative religious communities? How do we access parallel societies? Why do young boys turn into Isis fighters? And how can we help each other cover these stories and share information?

    TV 2 Denmark invites you to an informal meet and greet session. We hope to meet and exchange contact information with other reporters from around the globe who share the interest in covering these subjects. We think that forming an international network of journalists could be useful and hopefully we will be able to help each other in the future. TV 2 Denmark has worked extensively with closed religious communities -- over the past months the station has aired four documentaries based on hidden-camera recordings by two moles installed in a conservative religious community in Denmark. A short excerpt from the series will be played.

    Preservation Hall

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Panama Papers: How the world's largest collaborative investigation came together

    Speakers: Mar Cabra of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Michael Hudson of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Joachim Dyfvermark of Swedish Television; Chrys Wu of Matchstrike LLC

    **Moderated by Chrys Wu, The New York Times

    How did 370+ journalists from 100+ news outlets keep the biggest leak in journalism history a secret for a year? How did they work together to pull off an investigation that brought down a prime minister and sparked citizen protests and official probes around the world? Journalists from the Panama Papers team answer these questions and many others as they discuss how to make news partnerships work and how to expose offshore misconduct.

    Salon D

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Saturday - #2 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Patricia DiCarlo of CNN

    **Moderated by Patricia DiCarlo, CNN

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Saturday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Friday.

    Galerie 2

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    When, why and how to use unnamed sources (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Steve Buttry of Louisiana State University

    Unnamed sources can be the key to a powerful whistleblowing investigation, or can damage the credibility of your story. Or both. In this workshop, we’ll discuss situations that justify granting confidentiality to a source, as well as those that don’t. We’ll discuss how to use unnamed sources as a pathway to documentation or named sources. We’ll also discuss how to persuade a source to speak on the record.

    Galerie 1

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast management: Good pitching and good coaching

    Speakers: Matt Goldberg of NBCUniversal; Mikel Schaefer of WVUE-New Orleans; Nicole Vap of KUSA/9News Denver

    What makes great investigators on the outside can make them a pain to manage. If you’re good at your job, chances are you’re good at driving your boss crazy, too. Learn from some of the most patient managers in the business on how to manage up and hear their tips for how to structure and lead a team for success.

    Galerie 3

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Crossing borders: Exploring issues of visa and migrant abuse

    Speakers: Daffodil Altan of Investigative Reporting Program; Garance Burke of The Associated Press; Ron Nixon of The Associated Press

    Recent cases such as the San Bernardino terrorism shootings, human trafficking, worker abuse, sexual abuse of migrant children and shady business deals involving foreign investors show the need for reporters to understand the exploitation of migrants as well as the U.S. visa program. You will leave this session with data sources, FOIA tips and story ideas that affect your community, region and state. This session will be useful to both U.S. and international reporters.

    Galerie 4-5

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Digging Into nonprofits: Beyond 990s

    Speaker: Cindy Lott of Columbia University

    The tax exempt and nonprofit sector is replete with opportunities for journalists: as with any sector that comprises over 9% of the GDP and employment figures, it involves money, power, policy, politics, regulation, enforcement, fraud and state and federal involvement. This session will help you understand the current (and evolving) ecosystem of state and federal agencies and offices that touch the tax exempt sector, as well as major membership organizations and think tanks in helping direct your research.

    Salon F-H

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    Educators: Sometimes it hurts - covering traumatic events (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Katherine Reed of Missouri School of Journalism

    How reporters approach, interview and tell the stories of trauma survivors can cause harm or produce narratives that help improve the public’s understanding of subjects like sexual and domestic violence, human trafficking, mass shootings and disasters. Journalists need a basic understanding of the impact of trauma on the brain to be able to interpret and responsibly report stories of human suffering. They must also consider the need for greater transparency about reporting methods and processes with people recovering from the impact of trauma. How journalists balance the demands of the story with compassion for trauma survivors can produce better journalism. This session will explore that balancing act.

     

    Galerie 1

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    From tips, to stories, to paying the bills: A playbook for crowd-driven investigations (Sponsored by CUNY Graduate School of Journalism)

    Speakers: Terry Parris Jr. of ProPublica; Carrie Brown of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism; Jesse Hardman of Internews; Alana Jesse of Indiegogo

    **Moderated by Carrie Brown, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

    Involving audiences in the reporting process is valuable for any kind of story, but can be particularly productive for investigative efforts. This panel goes through a playbook of listening to communities to set investigative priorities, conduct effective investigations and crowdfund investigative efforts.

    Studio 9-10

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    More with R

    Speakers: Ryan Menezes of Los Angeles Times; Christine Zhang of Baltimore Sun

    Learn more about the free stats program R to quickly do statistics for stories. This session will use New Orleans Census data to showcase simple charting, analysis techniques and other tools in R that can be used on a daily basis by reporters.

    This session is good for: People who attended Getting Started with R or are comfortable working with code and have basic data knowledge.

    Salon A

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: How to have "the talk" with your editor

    Speaker: Steven Rich of The Washington Post

    **Moderated by Steven Rich, The Washington Post

    Great news: there's data out there on nearly every possible subject! Bad news: a lot of it is basically unusable for any number of reasons. It can be difficult to tell your editor that the data doesn't exist or is too poor to use. Let's talk about strategies to help have this conversation in both our newsrooms and in the data journalism community.

    Preservation Hall

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Saturday - #3 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Jim Strickland of WSB-Atlanta

    **Moderated by Jim Strickland, WSB-Atlanta

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Saturday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Friday.

    Galerie 2

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Uncovering stories on the schools beat

    Speakers: Tawnell Hobbs of The Wall Street Journal; Michael LaForgia of The New York Times; Ellen Gabler of The New York Times; Francisco Vara-Orta of IRE and NICAR

    **Moderated by Ellen Gabler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Put a sharper edge on covering one of the important issues in your community: Education. We'll talk about developing story ideas, finding data that means something, and writing a story that public officials and parents cannot ignore. Our panelists will explain how to analyze national and local data to show education disparities in your communities, and how to hold school districts accountable for decisions that led to those disparities. We'll talk test scores, discipline, teacher quality and more.

    Salon E

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Under pressure: Real life in real time with breaking news (repeat session)

    Speaker: Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area

    Come experience the real heart pounding excitement of a breaking news simulation where your investigative reporting and computer assisted reporting skills will be put through the ringer and to the test as teams compete to see who can break real, enterprise news in a minute by minute breaking news scenario. Sharpen your skills or learn new techniques to take back to your newsroom to help your team win the day the next time a big breaking news story happens in your backyard.See how good your skills really are. This class will teach you skills you can also use for everyday general assignment reporting/stories to take your career to the next level (not just breaking news.)

    Prerequisites: None. This class can be useful to anyone from novice beginners to experienced internet jockeys.

    Salon B

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    What costs nothing but isn't free? The battle over zero-rating (Sponsored by Media Democracy Fund)

    Speakers: Malavika Jayaram of Digital Asia Hub; Sarah Morris of Open Technology Institute; Nicol Turner-Lee of MMTC; Mike Ludwig of Truthout.org

    **Moderated by Mike Ludwig, Truthout.org

    To counter the digital divide, especially internationally, companies including Facebook and T-mobile have proposed zero-rating. In this model, users pay nothing for access to walled-garden internet. Those opposed argue that zero-rating violates net neutrality by privileging the providers’ content over any other. This session will introduce you to the intricacies of this policy fight, both as it plays out in the United States and globally.

    Salon D

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Awards Luncheon

    Grand Ballroom

    12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    An intro to coding in Python pt. 1

    Speakers: Aaron Kessler of CNN; Christopher Schnaars of USA TODAY Network

    Give us an hour, and we'll introduce you to the basics of programming with Python 3.4. You might have heard about journalists trying to code and might even know people in your newsroom who can make magical things happen. We're here to tell you it's easier than you might think to get started with this critical addition to your toolbox. In this hands-on class, we'll cover basic programming concepts to help demystify it, and we'll show you where to find the resources you need to keep building your Python skills after the conference.

    Prerequisites: None. No knowledge of Python or computer programming is necessary.

    Salon B

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Best of broadcast

    Speaker: Tisha Thompson of ESPN

    Watch and listen as the photographers, editors and producers behind this year’s IRE Award winners and finalists explain how they did it, what they would do differently and what they were really thinking when things got hard.

    Galerie 3

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Broadcast deep dives 3 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speakers: Michael Bott of NBC Bay Area; Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area; Brian Collister of Investigative Network; Joe Ellis of KVUE/ABC Austin; Chris Vanderveen of KUSA/9News Denver

    Galerie 2

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Campus coverage: Policing the campus police

    Speakers: Paula Lavigne of ESPN; Frank LoMonte of Brechner Center for Freedom of Information; Aaron Wische of KPRC-Houston; Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV

    **Moderated by Jill Riepenhoff, The Columbus Dispatch

    Like the campuses themselves, colleges’ police departments, whether public or private, exist in a world of secrecy. Ohio and Texas are but a few states that have forced private universities to open records to the public. Even so, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to pry loose records about sexual assaults and other serious crimes on campus. Police are slow to alert students about serious crimes – and often ignore those that happen off campus, where the majority of students live. And they’re even more reluctant to release information about excessive use of force by campus police. But there are ways to work around these roadblocks. Come to this session to learn how.

    Galerie 6

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Lottery scandals

    Speaker: Russ Ptacek of independent journalist

    From the story idea to the FOIA, to the data crunch, backgrounding and all the way to final TV news production. How we did it and how you can too.

    This session is good for: Anyone.

    Salon A

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Human rights investigations (Sponsored by Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma)

    Speakers: Carlos Dada of independent journalist; Angela Kocherga of Cronkite News, Arizona PBS; Bruce Shapiro of Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma; Mostafa ElMarsafawy of independent journalist

    **Moderated by Bruce Shapiro, Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma

    Salon D

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating the military and veterans' issues (Sponsored by Bloomberg)

    Speakers: Thomas Brennan of The War Horse; Tony Capaccio of Bloomberg News; Christopher Drew of Louisiana State University

    The Pentagon wants to spend about $184 billion next year on weapons procurement and research. This touches many regions. The session will outline DoD,congressional and public interest resources for tracking defense spending, and contracts and contractor performance in your readership area. It will also focus on how to develop sources and get deeply inside secretive military communities -- such as Navy SEALs and submariners -- starting at ground zero. We'll also discuss the importance of attention to detail needed to cover the military. This includes not lumping all veterans together and understanding there are intricacies to each branch. Calling a Marine a soldier is a detail that loses trust and confidence. The lack of attention to detail is one of the main reasons service members tend to distrust journalists.

     

    Galerie 4-5

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Management: Creating a watchdog newsroom

    Speakers: Manny Garcia of USA TODAY Network; Ray Rivera of The Seattle Times; Steve Suo of The Oregonian/OregonLive; Mark Rochester of Detroit Free Press

    **Moderated by Mark Rochester, The Herald

    Newsrooms must pursue watchdog journalism in order to carry out their responsibility for public service. But what can senior managers do to ensure that watchdog journalism becomes part of the routine newsroom culture? Top editors share their experiences carrying out that commitment in their newsrooms, in everything from providing resources and training, to hiring decisions to setting expectations for a watchdog paper.

    Salon F-H

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: Story clinic (repeat)

    Speakers: Mark Horvit of University of Missouri; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV; Denise Malan of IRE and NICAR

    Got a question on how to pursue a story? Curious about how to approach a FOIA? Stumped by some data? IRE and NICAR staff will be available to offer advice. Story consultations are confidential and will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Preservation Hall

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Sports investigations

    Speakers: Shaun Assael of independent journalist; John Diedrich of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Steve Riley of Houston Chronicle; Kevin Merida of ESPN

    **Moderated by Kevin Merida, ESPN The Undefeated

    The world of sports is ripe for investigations. This panel of reporters and editors will give practical advice and insight on how to pierce these often-insular institutions, holding sports figures and powerful programs accountable. Panelists will discuss how traditional reporting like source development and records requests coupled with social media and archival video digging will help nail the story. They will describe the advantages of the rolling investigation, working with beat reporters on sensitive stories, interview techniques for broadcast vs. online/print and strategies for taking on that local “sacred-cow” team.

    Studio 9-10

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Demo

    Stupid offshore tricks (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: Drew Sullivan of Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project

    Offshore companies are a key cog in the global economy, especially in developing countries. But how are offshores really used? It turns out the criminal services industry has been working hard to craft creative new ways of using them not only to avoid taxes, but also to steal money, pay bribes, launder ill-gotten gains, hide assets and a host of other audacious activities. In clear terms, this panel will give you an A-to-Z discussion of most ways criminals and the corrupt use offshores to lie, cheat and steal.

    Galerie 1

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    The Grammar of Graphics: Making Plots in R using ggplot2

    Speaker: Sandhya Kambhampati of Los Angeles Times

    Graphing data is one of the core components of data analysis. Visualizing information can help journalists quickly identify trends within a dataset, and a powerful visual can tell a compelling story. In this session, you’ll learn the basics of the ggplot2 package in R (an open-source statistical language), including installing the package and using it for plotting, exploring, and transforming data. You’ll leave with an appreciation for the grammar of graphics and the power of ggplot2 for both exploratory and explanatory purposes. Prerequisites: This workshop will be most helpful for those who have experience working with data, preferably in R.

    Salon C

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Panel

    Uncovering stories on the criminal justice beat

    Speakers: R.G. Dunlop of Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting; Topher Sanders of ProPublica; Cheryl W. Thompson of NPR; Maya Lau of Los Angeles Times

    **Moderated by Cheryl W. Thompson, The Washington Post

    From finding stories to getting key documents, this session will examine it all, including filing FOIAs versus obtaining records from sources; getting people to talk; and using data to tell a story. Panelists will offer tips on developing quick stories on the beat and turning them into must reads.

    Salon E

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    An intro to coding in Python pt. 2

    Speakers: Christopher Schnaars of USA TODAY Network; Aaron Kessler of CNN

    The second half of this hands-on class introduces you to some simple programming concepts you will use repeatedly when dealing with information such as lists of names or numbers you want to crunch. We'll also show you how to use Python's built-in help system to keep you from getting lost when challenges arise. If time permits, we'll demonstrate why programming has become a must-have skill for journalists by showing you how you can use Python to scrape websites and parse data.

    Prerequisites: If you did not attend An intro to coding in Python, Part 1, you should have some very basic knowledge of Python. 

    Salon B

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Working on your own

    Speakers: Philip Drechsler of NBC4 Los Angeles; Brendan Keefe of WXIA-Atlanta; Danielle Leigh of ABC7 New York/WABC

    Learn the secrets to creating investigative stories on your own, including deceptively simple tips and tricks that will make you the Swiss army knife of your newsroom. What traits do successful solo investigators have in common? Hear from veteran journalists who research, produce, write, shoot, and edit their own national-award-winning work to learn new skills you can add to your investigative toolbox.

     

    Galerie 3

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Campus coverage: Investigating entrenched powers, from athletics to fraternities and more

    Speakers: Marcelo Rochabrun of ProPublica; Craig Flournoy of University of Cincinnati; Camri Nelson of University of Cincinnati; Dan Kane of The News & Observer; Michael Lindenberger of Houston Chronicle

    **Moderated by Michael Lindenberger, The Dallas Morning News

    Investigative Journalists working for campus publications can't escape the consequences of their reporting. Often, they're writing about friends, classmates and professors. They - the best ones, anyway -- often challenge core beliefs and deep traditions that permeate their campus. Come hear how young journalists took on the privileged world of private campus dining clubs at Princeton and, at Cincinnati, revealed just how much big-time college football relies on fees wrenched out of already hard-pressed students' pocketbooks. How did they source the stories? Find the data? Did j-school faculty help or hinder? If they needed allies, where did they find them?

    Salon F-H

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Innocence projects

    Speakers: Alec Klein of The Medill Justice Project; Brian O'Donoghue of University of Alaska Fairbanks; Maurice Possley of National Registry of Exonerations; Brad Heath of USA TODAY Network

    **Moderated by Brad Heath, USA TODAY NETWORK

    Studio 9-10

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Innovations in storytelling

    Speakers: Paul Cheung of Knight Foundation; Adam Playford of Tampa Bay Times

    Animation. Data visualization. Virtual Reality. Annotated Documents. GIFs. Journalists can tell stories in ways that would have been unimaginable a decade ago. This hands-on session will up your game in modern storytelling by visualizing and wireframing essential elements for your next story.

    Salon D

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Longform investigative narrative: Telling stories on different platforms

    Speakers: Greg Borowski of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Susanne Reber of Scripps Washington Bureau; Dave Savini of CBS/WBBM Chicago; Alice Brennan of Fusion

    **Moderated by Dave Savini, CBS/WBBM Chicago

    From conceptualization to final product, editors describe what it takes to produce immersive multimedia presentations that tell investigative stories from a narrative perspective. Areas covered include how to identify stories ripe for this treatment, how to manage a multi-platform project and how best to present elements of the story in video, audio and interactive formats.

    Galerie 6

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Special Event

    NICAR Commons: Knight workshop - 10 campus investigations you can start today

    Speaker: Sarah Hutchins of IRE and NICAR

    Learn how to hold the powerful accountable at your university. At this session, we'll introduce 10 story ideas and discuss the sources, documents and data needed for each. Learn how to expose problems with student housing, independent study classes and Greek life. Get the ammunition you need to follow your student fees, investigate your campus police and background your school's trustees.

    Preservation Hall

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Show and Tell

    Show & Tell *Saturday - #4 (Sponsored by Napoli Management Group)

    Speaker: Sarah Buduson of WEWS-Cleveland

    **Moderated by Sarah Buduson, WEWS-Cleveland

    Show & Tell sessions allow you to share your investigations with colleagues from around the country. Veteran broadcasters will moderate each session. Each slot runs for 10 minutes and includes a 5-minute break.

    Reserve a slot online: Saturday sign-ups open at 9 a.m. on Friday.

    Galerie 2

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Stats in Excel

    Speaker: Steve Doig of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

    You don't need a special statistics program to run simple statistics. In this session, you'll learn how to compute some basic statistics in Excel and figure out what they mean.

    This session will be most helpful if: You already are comfortable with using functions in Excel.

    Salon A

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Uncovering stories on the environment beat (Sponsored by Society of Environmental Journalists)

    Speakers: Rosalia Omungo of Kenya Broadcasting Corporation; Ben Raines of AL.com; Mike Soraghan of E&E News; Mark Schleifstein of The Times-Picayune, NOLA.com

    **Moderated by Mark Schleifstein, The Times-Picayune, NOLA.com

    Panelists will talk about how to discover whether your roads are paved with mercury, whether offshore drill sites might qualify for Superfund, where underwater forests can be found, how to pry information out of your state oil and gas agencies, how to explain threats to drinking water supplies in Kenya and how to find and produce other environment stories overseas and on this continent. We might even reveal the secret of using the Federal Register as an environment tip sheet, and get tips on using SEJ’s web site and list serves to assist your reporting.

    Salon E

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Panel

    Uncovering stories on the local government beat

    Speakers: Nick Grube of Honolulu Civil Beat; Terri Langford of independent journalist; Travers Mackel of WDSU-New Orleans

    Learn how to cut through the tiresome meetings, and bureaucratic jargon and walk away with fantastic stories that have readers asking for more. and more.

    Galerie 4-5

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Unleash the data: Tools and tricks for taming PDFs (repeat session)

    Speaker: Miguel Barbosa of CitizenAudit

    This class will cover basic approaches for getting text out of PDF documents using powerful and freely available tools. Participants will be introduced to basic concepts and walked-through tackling common challenges encountered with tricky PDF documents.

    This class is best for: People who are unfamiliar with the PDF to text tools or would like to learn how optical character recognition (OCR) tools can be used for extracting difficult text from images embedded in PDF documents.

    Salon C

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Demo

    When journalism and security research collide (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Jeremy Gillula of Electronic Frontier Foundation; Dave Maass of Electronic Frontier Foundation; Cora Currier of The Intercept; Yael Grauer of Arizona State University

    Since the Snowden revelations, we've seen an uptick in journalists teaming up with technologists for deep research into government surveillance and digital freedom. At the Electronic Frontier Foundation, staff are combining traditional journalist techniques with security research to generate new kinds of investigations, from exposing insecure software giveaways by police to revealing mismanaged license plate reader networks. EFF Staff Technologist Jeremy Gillula and EFF Investigative Researcher Dave Maass will discuss some of their most impactful investigations and outline ways that technologist and reporters can combine forces in the years to come.

    Galerie 1

    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

  • Membership Meeting

    IRE Membership meeting

    Mark Horvit, IRE's Executive Director, will hold a membership meeting for all IRE members on Saturday evening at 5:30 p.m. in the Carondelet Ballroom located on the 3rd floor.

    Carondelet

    5:30 pm - 6:15 pm

  • Special Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    6:00 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Membership Meeting

    Bissonet

    6:15 pm - 6:30 pm

  • Reception

    Closing reception

    Join us for a closing reception Saturday evening in the Acadia Ballroom, located on the 3rd floor, from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. and enjoy one last evening of catching up with old and new friends, speakers and colleagues.   

    Hors d' oeuvres and a cash bar will be available. Conference name tags are required for entry.

    Acadia

    6:30 pm - 7:30 pm

  • Special Event

    IRE Sales Table (Sunday)

    Stop by the IRE sales table and take a look at our merchandise. We will be selling books, the large selection of titles we carry will certainly include your interests. All proceeds from your purchase help support IRE and its mission.  Sales will be located in Preservation Hall on the 2nd floor of the New Orleans Marriott.

    Preservation Hall

    8:30 am - 10:30 am

  • Hands-on

    Coding for journalists (cont'd) **pre-registered attendees only (Sunday)

    Speaker: Alex Richards of NerdWallet

    This is a continuation of Saturday's hands-on workshop.  Pre-registered attendees only. 

    Salon C

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Finding stuff online: A journalist's guide to tracking down information

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Mark Horvit of University of Missouri

    Salon 9-10

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Finding the story: Bridges

    Speaker: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    Every state has bridges: how safe are yours? This is a question that appeals to everyone (we all drive and/or walk on bridges), and the National Bridge Inventory can help you answer it. In this session, we'll dive into the data for Louisiana, discuss additional sources, and sketch out stories that work in any city. ​

    To get the most from this session, you should have some experience working with data in spreadsheets.

    Salon A

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    Free options for mapping (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: David Herzog of IRE and NICAR

    Galerie 1

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Protecting your sources: Using encryption and other tech tools to keep your work safer

    Speaker: Jennifer Valentino-DeVries of The Wall Street Journal

    Protecting your sources and work from prying eyes is no mean feat in a digital world. This session covers techniques from the basic to more advanced. Learn what data your gadgets can reveal about you; how to choose and remember strong passwords; and how to protect emails, documents and phone communications with strong encryption.

    Galerie 4-5

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Web scraping for anyone (repeat session)

    Speaker: Samantha Sunne of independent journalist

    You don't have to write code to coax data off the web - with some clicks and tricks and elbow grease, you can get data and documents even your sources don't want you to have. We'll cover tools you can use out of the box, more advanced techniques, plus secret Internet passageways to the data you want.

    Salon B

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Brave new world: Monitoring activists, monitoring reporters (Sponsored by Media Democracy Fund)

    Speakers: Brandi Collins of ColorOfChange; Steven Renderos of Media Action Grassroots Network; Mike Rispoli of Free Press; Dave Maass of Electronic Frontier Foundation

    **Moderated by Dave Maass, Electronic Frontier Foundation

    Surveillance has gone 360 degrees. Live video footage scrambled by jammers. Stingrays intercept phone calls. Video from drones flying overhead can immediately be parsed by facial recognition software to identify individuals. Metadata helps the NSA (and corporations) guess where we will go next, who we associate with, and more. Increasingly, the NSA, FBI and local police work together to conduct surveillance on activists--and journalists.

    Galerie 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Career roundtable

    Speakers: Sarah Cohen of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Jennifer Forsyth of The Wall Street Journal; Josh Meyer of POLITICO; Steven Rich of The Washington Post; Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV; Stephen Stock of NBC Bay Area; Mark Horvit of University of Missouri

    **Moderated by Mark Horvit, IRE/NICAR

    Looking for advice on how to take the next step in your career? Get practical tips from panelists who will talk about their own experiences and discuss what employers are looking for.

    Galerie 4-5

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    Grilling Jerry Mitchell for breakfast (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Jerry Mitchell of Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting; Robert Cribb of Toronto Star

    **Moderated by Robert Cribb, Toronto Star

    As a veteran investigative reporting working in Mississippi, Jerry Mitchell has won delayed justice for many black Americans who were murdered in the civil rights era. The extraordinary results of his work have been recognized in multiple ways, including the film "Ghosts of Mississippi," which told of his investigation of the murder of Medgar Evers, which resulted in the trial and conviction of a KKK member. Get some Sunday-morning inspiration and a window into what it takes to investigate decades-old cold cases.

    Galerie 1

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Interrogating data with SQL pt. 1

    Speaker: Troy Thibodeaux of The Associated Press

    SQL (Structured Query Language) is one of the most useful tools in the data journalism tool belt. It’s a pretty simple language that does something pretty powerful: it lets you communicate with your database and spell out exactly the questions you want to ask about your data. Using the lightweight SQLite database manager, we’ll focus on queries that can be used in many different database programs. Join us for a gentle introduction to SQL that will convince you this stuff isn’t so hard. This is the first in a series of two classes.

    Suggested Technical Experience: Familiarity with spreadsheets will be useful, but no previous database experience or other technical knowledge required.

    Salon A

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Simple mapping with Fusion Tables

    Speaker: Thomas Thoren of Independent

    Google Fusion Tables is a free, lesser-known tool that is included with Google Drive. It allows you to map addresses or latitude and longitude coordinates using Google’s geocoding service. We will cover how to import data into Fusion Tables, explore basic geographic trends, style a map and export the data to an interactive Google map that is ready for publication.

    Attendees do not need any prior experience with spreadsheets or mapping tools.

    Salon B

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Year in investigations

    Speakers: Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    Pick up some story ideas and be inspired with the highlights of some of the year's best investigations.

    Salon 9-10

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Getting data into Excel (repeat session)

    Speaker: Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    Salon B

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Hot emerging environmental topics to take home with you (Sponsored by Society of Environmental Journalists)

    Speakers: Jeff Burnside of independent journalist; Rob Davis of The Oregonian/OregonLive; Sharon Guynup of Woodrow Wilson International Center; Ingrid Lobet of Johns Hopkins University

    Unregulated air pollutants. Big changes for your seafood. The growing shift in how we treat wildlife. Before you head home from IRE, you can pick and choose from several emerging environmental tips with plenty of subtopics and get started on quickly. You’ll get little-known story angles from top reporters selected by the Society of Environmental Journalists, which organizes this popular panel format each year at IRE.

    Galerie 4-5

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Interrogating data with SQL pt. 2

    Speaker: Troy Thibodeaux of The Associated Press

    This class is a continuation of "Interrogating data with SQL pt. 1" held from 10:15-11:15 a.m.

    Salon A

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    The digital FOIA: How to get the government to give you the database you want (Sponsored by Knight Foundation)

    Speaker: T. Christian Miller of ProPublica

    This session will examine the use of public records laws to obtain databases from government agencies. Think big: get access to every criminal case in your county, every prisoner in your state, every injured federal employee. Also, dog license databases make for great stories. We will go from soup to nuts, looking at how to file a request, how to negotiate for it, and what to expect upon delivery. This session will not review analysis tools like spreadsheet or database software, but it will teach you how to get the stuff to analyze.

    Galerie 1

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Using U.S. FOIA to get information on your own country

    Speakers: Mark Horvit of University of Missouri; Jaimi Dowdell of Reuters

    Studio 9-10

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm