2017 CAR Conference

Join IRE and NICAR for our annual conference devoted to computer-assisted reporting. Come and learn about tools you need to dig deeper into stories and give readers and viewers the information they want.

For additional details, please visit the conference page.

Time and place

Thursday, Mar. 2, 2017 - Sunday, Mar. 5, 2017

Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront
225 East Coastline Dr
Jacksonville, Florida 32202


Registration information

Registration for this event is open! Click here to begin.

Hurry! Registration closes on Sunday, Mar. 5 at 12:00pm.


Schedule details

  • Outside Event

    Techraking <=19: Bootstrapping the News (Sponsored by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting)

    Speakers: Michael Corey of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Eric Sagara of Big Local News; Scott Pham of BuzzFeed News; Emmanuel Martinez of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

    Register now!

    Give us four hours and your laptop, and we’ll send you into NICAR with a fully-functioning data-crunching machine and the knowledge to use it.

    One of the biggest hurdles to learning programming is the often bewildering process of setting up your computer. Veteran programmers and data crunchers from Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting will give you a virtual playground on your personal laptop that will allow you to explore all the tools you'll gather throughout the conference. In this four-hour workshop, we’ll introduce crucial programming concepts and tools and -- most importantly -- why we use them.

    You’ll walk into conference sessions with a laptop loaded with many of the tools presenters will be talking about, and a leg up as you continue developing your skills once you're back home.

    Target audience: People with no or minimal exposure to programming who need a jumping off point to get their feet wet so they are prepared for programming classes at the conference.

    Requirements to attend: Laptop with administrative privileges

    Minimum technical specifications: Windows: Version 7 or higher; Mac: OS 10.9 (Mavericks) or higher. 4 GB of RAM, 15 GB of free hard-drive space. English layout keyboard strongly preferred. (Other layouts may work, but we've had trouble with certain characters in the past and our ability to provide tech support will be limited.)

    Participants will walk away with a fully functioning dev machine (on their personal laptop) that includes: VirtualBox, Ubuntu/Xbuntu, Bower, csvkit, Django, Fabric, Git, Grunt, Ilene, MySQL, Node.js, NPM, PostgreSQL, PostGIS, PANDAS, Python, QuantumGIS, R, RBENV, Rails, Ruby, SQLite, Tabula, virtualenv/virtualenvwrapper

    Additional details including the schedule for the workshop can be found on the conference website.

    *Basic Schedule:*

    *1-5 p.m.*

    I. Programming: Why should you care?

    II. What we're about to install

    III. Installing VirtualBox and Ubuntu

    IV. Brief overview of stuff you got with your install

    V. Using your new powers

      A. Navigating the command line

      B. Updating/installing software with apt

      C. Working with open-source software

      D. Basic version control (git)

      E. How to get help

    5 p.m. Beer/mingling (Location: Fionn MacCool's)

    Register for this workshop.

    River Terrace 3

    1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference registration (Wednesday)

    Registration will be located on the 3rd floor Skybridge of the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront. 

    3rd floor - Skybridge

    1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference sales (Wednesday)

    Stop by the NICAR Conference sales table and browse our merchandise, including the IRE bookstore's most popular titles and shirts with the winning design from the NICAR T-shirt contest. 

    3rd floor - Skybridge

    1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Outside Event

    Gentrification clues: Datasets that predict urban upheaval (Sponsored by Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism)

    Speaker: Evan Wyloge of The Desert Sun

    Free pre-conference workshop on Wednesday, March 1 from 2-5 p.m.

    Evan Wyloge, senior reporter at AZCIR (the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting) has spent a decade focusing on accountability and watchdog reporting, with an emphasis on data analysis. In this workshop, he will identify disparate datasets that allow reporters to analyze the evolving economic landscape of metro areas.

    Population density, incomes and property values, the overall volume of economic activity, and racial and ethnic diversity are all clues that can help reporters understand the dynamic shift toward a more urbanized population. Wyloge will show you how to navigate surprising databases and mine the key points to develop insightful stories on the future of your community.

    This pre-conference workshop is produced by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism.

    River Terrace 2

    2:00 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference registration (Thursday)

    Registration will be located on the 3rd floor Skybridge of the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront. 

    3rd floor - Skybridge

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference sales (Thursday)

    Stop by the NICAR Conference sales table and browse our merchandise, including the IRE bookstore's most popular titles and shirts with the winning design from the NICAR T-shirt contest. 

    3rd floor - Skybridge

    7:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    River Terrace 2

    7:30 am - 8:15 am

  • Panel

    Welcome and overview of the conference

    Welcome to the conference! IRE staff will highlight key sessions and events that you won't want to miss while in Jacksonville. We'll also give you a brief rundown on some of the resources IRE has to offer.

    **Speakers are IRE/NICAR Staff

    Conference Center B

    8:30 am - 8:50 am

  • Hands-on

    Map camp: QGIS (intermediate) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: David Herzog of IRE and NICAR; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    Learn how to uncover interesting news stories by mapping data with geographic information system (GIS) software during our intensive mini-boot camp.

    IRE and NICAR trainers conduct this hands-on training using the latest version of QGIS, open source-software that runs on all platforms. We will look at noteworthy stories that have used mapping and show you how to uncover stories using census and other data. You’ll learn how to display data geographically; import and query data; geocode to merge databases with addresses into maps. In addition, we'll provide you with our boot camp materials to help keep you on track long after you leave the conference. 

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    Workshop prerequisites: Participants should have basic knowledge in using relational database programs such as Microsoft Access, MySQL or SQLite.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    City Terrace 9

    9:00 am - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Programming for humans, in Python (intermediate/advanced) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Jeremy Bowers of The New York Times; Serdar Tumgoren of Stanford University

    You’ve written a few Python scripts that get the job done, but the initial euphoria has worn off. Your code is hard to understand. Bugs are cropping up. Worse, you can’t always explain your process or results to an editor — or yourself. There must be a better way, but the path forward is not clear. If you’ve had that itchy feeling, this full-day, hands-on workshop is for you. After mastering the basics of writing code, you need to understand how to design programs. To that end, this class will explore Python language features that will help you write readable, reliable and reusable code.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. 

    **Attendees must bring a laptop and charger to the training.

    Workshop prerequisites: Experience with basic Python language features like variables, data types, conditionals and functions are required.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    City Terrace 7

    9:00 am - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    PyCAR (beginner) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Heather Battaglia of 18F; Adriana Homolova of KRO-NCRV; Tom Meagher of The Marshall Project; Roberto Rocha of CBC; Eric Sagara of Big Local News; Chris Keller of Los Angeles Times; Elaine Wong of CBC/Radio-Canada

    This hands-on workshop will teach journalists basic programming concepts using the Python language. The daylong class will introduce language basics and useful libraries in the course of a typical reporting project: scraping data from the web, inserting it in a database and analyzing the results.

    Although the class is geared toward beginners, we'll assume that you're comfortable with databases and SQL and that you've hopefully seen a command line since the days of DOS.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    Workshop prerequisites: Attendees should have familiarity with the command line and are comfortable with databases and SQL.

    Workshop times are Thursday 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. continuing Friday morning from 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. (Note: Registration for this session reserves your seat for both days of this workshop.  Attendees are expected to attend both session to complete this workshop).

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    City Terrace 5

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Algorithmic accountability

    Speakers: Julia Angwin of ProPublica; Nicholas Diakopoulos of Northwestern University; Sam Corbett-Davies of Stanford University; Greg Linch of Industry Dive

    Algorithms are increasingly used throughout the public and private sectors, making decisions that impact people’s lives in myriad ways. Algorithmic accountability reporting is an emerging set of methods for investigating how algorithms exert influence and power in society. In this session we’ll detail concrete investigations in this domain and discuss strategies, methods, and techniques for pursuing algorithmic accountability reporting.

    **Moderated by Greg Linch, McClatchy

     

    Conference Center A

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Carto maps

    Speaker: C.J. Sinner of Star Tribune

    If you’re looking for an interactive mapping tool that doesn’t require coding, Carto, formerly known as CartoDB, is a great option. We’ll explore the user interface of this web-based tool, walk through examples of both point and polygon maps, and touch base on some presentation-polishing pro-tips.

    City Terrace 8

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Journalism's bottom line (Sponsored by SRCCON - OpenNews)

    Speaker: Janelle O'Dea of St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    This conversation will brainstorm coping strategies and solutions for working in corporate news and the roadblocks that come with it. How do we deal with the push to focus on "click bait" material, or doing just about anything to get more web traffic? The focus on boosting web traffic eats up time that could be spent on other important coverage and seems to at times detract from the mission. In newsrooms across the country, money has become so tight that it rules everything that we do. It shouldn't, but it does affect coverage. What's the point of boosting web traffic if we aren't really fulfilling the real purpose of journalism, which is watchdogging and being the fourth estate? This conversation will allow journalists who struggle with these issues to connect and think of creative ways to deal.

    City Terrace 12

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Excel for business & economics

    Speaker: Aaron Kessler of CNN

    Whether you just started using Excel or it's been your companion for years, chances are there's a lot it can do that you've never realized. We sometimes think of Excel as the stepping stone to database managers like Access or SQL Server, and overlook just how powerful its tools can be -- especially if you're covering business and economics. Come find out why Excel is still so popular in the business world and we'll unlock some of its secrets. The people you're covering know these tricks - you should too.

    This session is good for: People who understand Excel basics but want to unlock powerful functions for analyzing businesses.

     

    City Terrace 11

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Google Earth

    Speakers: Nassos Stylianou of BBC News; Ed Lowther of BBC News

    Find out how to make simple flyovers with Google Earth – a great way to make bespoke video content that you can weave into your visual journalism storytelling. This session should be fine for anyone, though some experience using Google Earth may come in handy.

    City Terrace 6

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Interactive data graphics in Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Ben Jones of Tableau Software

    Learn how to create beautiful, interactive data visualizations on short deadlines. No programming required. You'll learn everything you need to build data visualizations and publish them to your website just like a video. We'll teach you how to: 

    *Connect to Excel files and other data 

    *Create maps and charts 

    *Make them interactive 

    *Publish them on your site

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. No previous experience with Tableau is necessary to take this class. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the CAR Conference to attend this class.  Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class.

    City Terrace 4

    9:00 am - 10:30 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to commandline (PC)

    Speaker: Mike Stucka of The Palm Beach Post

    If you’ve never touched the little black box on your computer known as the command line, you’re ignoring an extremely helpful tool. In this session, you'll learn how to make the command line work for you and make it become a handy tool in your data toolbelt.

    This session is good for: Newbies to the command line who are brave enough to dive into the guts of their computer. This is geared toward Windows, but much of it translates to Macs.

     

     

    City Terrace 10

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    Security tools for journalists

    Speakers: Olivia Martin of Freedom of the Press Foundation; Mike Tigas of ProPublica

    With new threats posed daily to our ability to communicate with sources securely, maintain trust in our devices and research privately, it can feel impossible to know where to start with protecting your digital security. This demo, led by technologists and educators in the field, aims to teach journalists of any knowledge base how to identify their unique threat model and develop a security protocol — regarding secure communication, data storage, and browsing — accordingly. From addressing low-hanging fruit to mitigating sophisticated threats, the tools discussed in this session will introduce journalists to essential concepts in digital security and privacy.

    River Terrace 2

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    What the hell is R? And all the other questions you’re afraid to ask

    Speaker: Sisi Wei of ProPublica

    Ever wondered what people are talking about at this conference? What exactly is R and why you would want to use it? What is the difference between Ruby, Python and Javascript? And why is there a J in front of Query? How do you even pronounce PostgreSQL? Welcome to our no-judgment-starting-at-step-zero session even NICAR vets can use. We'll review tech concepts and jargon you'll likely hear at NICAR this year, explain what they mean, why they're useful and point you to the sessions that can teach you the terms you now understand.

    This session is good for: Anyone who has felt lost in the sea of technical terminology.

    Conference Center B

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Working together without sitting together: Building happy, productive distributed teams

    Speakers: Chris Canipe of Axios; Ryan Pitts of OpenNews; Julia Smith of Mother Jones

    How do you communicate when you or other members of your team are in different cities? Email, phones and Slack are great tools. But how do you stay abreast of progress and ideas without the casual connections and serendipity that happen when you share the same space? In this panel, we’ll talk about our experiences working remotely and the tools, processes and team-building techniques that help make it work.

     

    River Terrace 1

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Year in CAR

    Speakers: Lauren Grandestaff of IRE and NICAR; Kaitlin Washburn of The Sun-Gazette

    What were the big stories of the year? What were the most creative uses of data analysis? See what your colleagues have been up to and pick up some story ideas at the same time. This session is good for: Anyone.

    River Terrace 3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Basic stats in R (advanced)

    Speaker: Jeff Larson of The Markup

    Learn how to analyze data through methods grounded in statistical theory. Those familiar with R will be introduced to significance tests, risk ratios, various distributions and more.

     

    City Terrace 10

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Special Event

    Conversations: NICAR freelancers (Sponsored by SRCCON - OpenNews)

    Speaker: Samantha Sunne of independent journalist

    Freelance journalists and programmers, let's put our heads together! We'll have an informal chat about the joys and tribulations of being self-employed in the world of cutting-edge journalism. Hopefully, we'll trade some new tips and make some new friends. If you're thinking about going freelance, this may be a good session for you, too!

    City Terrace 12

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Educator huddle: Let's discuss the future

    Speakers: Brant Houston of University of Illinois; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University

    Come participate in a session to come up with an ideal data journalism curriculum across universities and programs. This will go beyond a panel session and focus on concrete ideas and proposals that you can take back and begin to put into place. We will use the wisdom of educators and journalists in the room to lay out best practices and the route to them.

     

    Conference Center B

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    GitHub for journos

    Speaker: Hector Alfaro of GitHub

    What is Git? What is GitHub? Why should I care? In this session, we’ll answer these questions and tap into why developers think GitHub is the best collaboration platform in the world. You'll learn how to navigate your way around GitHub.com and use it to find incredible projects.

    City Terrace 6

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    Good things come to those who weight: Conduct more reliable surveys using Veracio

    Speakers: Heather Krause of Datassist; Neal Rothleder of Orb Media

    Most surveys consist of informal, crowd-sourced data. While this data is valuable, it’s often mathematically flawed when demographic and socioeconomic factors are not considered. Our survey tool Veracio automatically weights your responses based on census demographics to produce more accurate data. Join us for our session to learn more about the importance of weighting, how weighting works in Veracio, and how to use the tool to inform your reporting.

    River Terrace 2

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Investigating hacking and data breaches

    Speakers: Julia Angwin of ProPublica; Sri Sridharan of Florida Center for Cybersecurity; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV

    **Moderated by Megan Luther, IRE/NICAR

    Conference Center A

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Packaging data stories for digital

    Speakers: Ashlyn Still of Reuters; Richard Watkins of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Brittany Mayes of NPR; Sarah Hutchins of IRE and NICAR

    You found a data set. You reported out a story. You double-checked your math. Now it’s time to get your findings online. If this sounds like your workflow, our session is for you. A team of news app designers and developers will deconstruct some of their favorite data-heavy projects and explain how it all came together. You’ll leave with ideas for how to make digital presentation the star of the show – not an afterthought.

    **Moderated by Sarah Hutchins, IRE/NICAR

    River Terrace 1

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Practical data viz in JavaScript

    Speaker: Maureen Linke of The Associated Press

    Learn how to use JavaScript, HTML, and CSS to build practical visualizations for your data. We'll cover how to make some essential chart/visualization types and go over data visualization best practices.

     

    City Terrace 8

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Sports data: How to play money ball

    Speakers: Steve Doig of ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism; Paula Lavigne of ESPN; John Templon of BuzzFeed News

    River Terrace 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Useful Excel functions for journalists

    Speaker: Juan Lyon of ----0000 Institution Not Present 0000----

    Much of Excel power comes in the form of functions. In this session, you will learn about commonly used functions, including how to use them to analyze data with the eye of a journalist. We will see functions as if and his relatives sumif, countif, sumifs, and more. Also we will see some other useful functions to arrange and clean data like trim, concatenate and vlookup.

    This session is good for: Journalists who want to dig deeper into Excel functions. (Journalists who want to see a little more Excel) 

     

    City Terrace 11

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Show where the story is happening with maps in Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Jenny Richards of Tableau Software

    Maps are where it’s at, and with the addition of spatial file support you can viz outside the box too. In this session you will learn different methods for building maps in Tableau Public. We will teach you how to:

    *determine what kind of mapping data you’re looking at

    *take advantage of spatial file support in Tableau Public

    *beautify maps with built-in and Mapbox-supported backgrounds

    *integrate maps into your dashboards

    *utilize design and layout best practices to make sure that your visualization looks polished and professional

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. Some familiarity with the product is recommended; a beginner session earlier in the day should prepare you enough for this session. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the CAR Conference to attend this class.  Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class.

    City Terrace 4

    11:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced stats in R: Linear and logistic regression (advanced)

    Speaker: Jeff Larson of The Markup

    Continue learning statistical analysis methods in R with lessons in linear regression and logistic regression analyses.

     

    City Terrace 10

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Agate for data analysis in Python

    Speakers: Neil Bedi of Tampa Bay Times; Christopher Groskopf of Quartz

    In this hands-on session we'll introduce you to programmatic data analysis with the agate module for Python. We'll go through the basics—reading CSV files, transforming data, and running basic statistical analysis—while leaving plenty of room for your questions. This session is ideal for folks with some Python experience, especially those who've reached the limits of what they can do with tools like csvkit, but find pandas and numpy bewildering.

    City Terrace 8

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Better than average: Working with high-dimensional data

    Speakers: Holly Hacker of The Dallas Morning News; Paul Overberg of The Wall Street Journal; Larry Fenn of The Associated Press

    Sometimes you have too much data -- scores or hundreds of characteristics about the people or places you're analyzing. Central measures like average or median are meaningless or absurd -- like who's the average voter? Hear how journalists use better ways, from indexes to regressions to even more powerful techniques like principal components analysis -- to find meaning in rich data.
     

    Conference Center A

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Remote working for journalists (Sponsored by SRCCON - OpenNews)

    Speaker: Kavya Sukumar of Hearken

    Remote working in journalism is sometimes very different than remote working in other fields. Even major national media outlets hesitate to allow remote workers for various reasons. I would love to have a conversation about whys why-nots, dos and don'ts of remote working.

    City Terrace 12

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Extracting data from PDFs

    Speaker: Acton Gorton of Chicago Tribune

    Learn how to use tools for extracting text from documents. The seminar will discuss the fundamentals of knowing the best tool for the job, a walk-through using online web applications, and an introduction to cracking tough cases using Optical Character Recognition (OCR). For questions before or after the course, please email Acton Gorton (actongorton@gmail.com). 

    City Terrace 6

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Finding narratives in the numbers

    Speakers: Reade Levinson of Reuters; Shawn McIntosh of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Conference Center B

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    OpenRefine

    Speakers: Nils Mulvad of Kaas & Mulvad; Robert Gebeloff of The New York Times

    OpenRefine is the best tool to clean really dirty data — the kind of data in which the same name might be spelled in 30 different ways. It has built-in cleaning tools for analysts and journalists.

    City Terrace 11

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Stories waiting to be told with housing data

    Speakers: Tim Henderson of The Pew Charitable Trusts; Skylar Olsen of Zillow

    River Terrace 3

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Structuring your data the right way the first time

    Speaker: Sandhya Kambhampati of Los Angeles Times

    River Terrace 2

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    The election data you should be paying attention to

    Speakers: Rachel Shorey of The New York Times; Derek Willis of ProPublica; Daniel Smith of University of Florida

    Election data isn't just results. Come learn about other datasets that help journalists and academics understand elections from people who use them. We’ll discuss voter files, election administration data and other sources, plus how to collaborate with researchers who already work in this area.

    River Terrace 1

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Preparing for the worst case scenario (Sponsored by SRCCON - OpenNews)

    Speaker: Sisi Wei of ProPublica

    A systematic persecution of specific minority groups in America (like the Japanese internment camps in the 1940s) has again become a scary and real possibility. If you've felt similar fears, have thought about your own emergency plans, let's talk. This session is not for people who are simply curious about why others might feel this way. Come to this session to talk emergency plan tips, building a geographically diverse support system for if/when the time comes, what to do as self-care in the meantime, and to know that you're not alone.

    City Terrace 12

    12:45 pm - 1:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Finding and telling data stories with Tableau Public (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Ben Jones of Tableau Software

    Got a dataset and an impending deadline to write a story on it? Find the scoop and convey it with beautiful, interactive visualizations in a serial narrative using Tableau Public. It’s a fast, easy to use, and free tool for journalists. Visualizations will publish using any CMS and no programming is required. 

    We’ll teach you how to:

    *Connect to Excel files and other file types

    *Rapidly explore and analyze datasets with ease

    *Make eye-catching visualizations to share your findings

    *Add interactivity and arrange them in a serial narrative to engage and sustain your audience’s attention

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. No previous experience with Tableau is necessary to attend. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the CAR Conference to attend this class. Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class.

    City Terrace 4

    1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Analyzing satellite imagery with Google Earth Engine

    Speakers: Chris Herwig of Google; Vanessa Schneider of Google; Eric Sagara of Big Local News

    Learn the basics of Earth Engine, Google's planetary-scale platform for geospatial analysis and visualization. Earth Engine (sister to Google Earth) has long been used by scientists quantifying differences on the Earth's surface. See how journalists at places like Reveal, Berliner Morgenpost and The New York Times have used the free tool to speed up normally complex and resource-intensive tasks and get hands-on with the Earth Engine API.

    Familiarity with GIS/remote sensing and satellite imagery is a plus, but not required. We'll be coding with the JavaScript API, but no prior JS experience is necessary. For Earth Engine access, go to: https://signup.earthengine.google.com.

    City Terrace 6

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Battling burnout in a tweet-breaking world

    Speakers: Darla Cameron of The Texas Tribune; Nikole Hannah-Jones of The New York Times Magazine; Andy Boyle of Axios; Cynthia Persico of Health Advocate Solutions

    Everyone who's worked in the need-it-yesterday deadlines of the news world knows it can sometimes get stressful. And for some, it can reach a breaking point, affecting not only your work, but also your mental and physical health. Panelists will share stories about how they got burned out, how they dealt with it, and some healthy coping mechanisms to keep you running well in body and spirit.

    **Moderated by Andy Boyle, Axios

    Conference Center A

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Building your own database

    Speakers: John Schoen of CNBC Digital; Sarah Ryley of The Trace; Meghan Hoyer of The Associated Press

    **Moderated by Meghan Hoyer, The Associated Press

    Conference Center B

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Covering K-12 while battling FERPA

    Speakers: Nathaniel Lash of The Philadelphia Inquirer; Jennifer Peebles of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Jennifer Smith Richards of Chicago Tribune

    Digging out the real story in a K-12 world increasingly reliant on data to make decisions can be hard when the black hole of federal student-privacy law tries to entrap everything in its gravitational pull. We'll talk about approaches to pushing back and what has worked and what hasn't. 

    River Terrace 1

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Design track: Dataviz workflows - Unexpected ways to use tools to publish print & web graphics (Sponsored by Society for News Design)

    Speakers: Troy Griggs of The New York Times; Ka Kay Rebecca Lai of The New York Times

    Using tools such as AI2HTML and SVG Crowbar to go from the web to print and back again.

    City Terrace 5

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Digital security preparation for reporting abroad

    Speaker: Olivia Martin of Freedom of the Press Foundation

    You're traveling abroad to cover a story: What steps can you take to secure your data, your devices, and your sources before heading to the airport? What are the pros and cons of bringing a burner into the field? How should you send notes to your editor before returning home? This hands-on workshop is designed to address the digital security needs of journalists as they travel overseas. Participants can expect to demo a number of software solutions and security practices — with particular focus paid to mobile and desktop security and file encryption.

    City Terrace 8

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    From drugs to doctors: Uncovering stories in health data

    Speakers: Jeff Ernsthausen of ProPublica; Ryan McNeill of Reuters; Nicole Vap of KUSA/9News Denver; Kristin Hussey of independent journalist

    In the bewildering world of healthcare data, there are no stupid questions. Join us to ask anything you’ve wondered about three of this year’s biggest healthcare investigations. Our speakers tackled thousands of doctor disciplinary records, tracked down and charted soaring drug prices and schooled the CDC on public health statistics. The stories they produced gave readers and viewers solid insights and actionable information. How’d they do it, and how can you bring similar stories to your newsroom? Come hear for yourself.

    **Moderated by Kristin Hussey, independent journalist 

    River Terrace 3

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Getting started with Excel

    Speaker: Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV

    In this introduction to spreadsheets you'll begin analyzing data with Excel, a simple but powerful tool. You'll learn how to enter data, sort it and conduct simple calculations like average and median. 

    City Terrace 11

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Python 1

    Speaker: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    Want to upgrade your data skills? Come learn the Python programming language for a three-hour span. Geared toward beginners, this class with go over language basics and introduce you to key concepts. You'll then take your new Python skills and learn how to automate simple tasks, as well as how to collect and manipulate data in pursuit of stories.

    City Terrace 10

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Meet the Computational Journalism Workbench

    Speaker: Jonathan Stray of Columbia Journalism School

    The Computational Journalism Workbench combines scraping, analysis, and visualization in one easy tool. It works by assembling simple modules into a “workflow,” a repeatable, sharable, automatically updating pipeline that produces a publishable chart or a live API endpoint. Use off the shelf modules to monitor data sources for changes, scrape sites, clean data, or even crowdsource a data processing task. No programming experience is necessary, but each module is just Python under the hood, making it infinitely extensible. Think of it as If This Then That for data journalism, with the power of Jupyter notebook and Chartbuilder built in.

    City Terrace 12

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Demo

    NPR responsive graphics tool

    Speakers: Sergio Hernandez of CNN; Matt Stiles of Los Angeles Times; Alyson Hurt of NPR

    River Terrace 2

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Big data in small organizations: How we created data-driven projects and stories at a startup

    Speakers: Eva Constantaras of Internews; Brent Jones of St. Louis Public Radio

    Whether you're a team of one, a small startup or battling despots abroad, we'll tell you how to pull off data-focused stories and projects with few dedicated resources. Our panel features journalists working with and within small teams in the U.S. and abroad who manage to produce stories and investigations with impact using data. We’ll share tips and tools to make you more efficient and project examples to show you what’s possible for a data journalist in a small shop. We’ll also talk about how to avoid mistakes, find mentors and get buy-in from others.

    River Terrace 1

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Design track: Intro to D3 (Sponsored by Society for News Design)

    Speakers: Darla Cameron of The Texas Tribune; Ashley Wu of Apple

    City Terrace 5

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Designing Tableau Visualizations for mobile (Hosted by Tableau)

    Speaker: Jenny Richards of Tableau Software

    Are mobile readers of your news site becoming more and more common? If your news organization is like others we’ve worked with, the percent of readers using phones and tablets to read your content is well over half of the overall number, and growing fast. Creating data visualizations for these small form-factors is very challenging. Learn how to use Tableau to create sheets and dashboards that work great, even on phones and tablets. 

    *Design considerations, including layout and formatting

    *Dashboard sizing for a range of screen widths

    *Utilizing Device Specific Designer for multi-screen support

    *Interactivity – filtering and tooltips

    *Options to embed visualizations to respond to reader device

    Tableau Public is a free tool for journalists. Some experience with Tableau Public is recommended. Taking one of the earlier Tableau sessions should suffice. Laptops will be provided. This is a free training, however you must be registered for the CAR Conference to attend this class. Limited seats are available. There may be a few seats available on-site.

    Register for this class.

    City Terrace 4

    3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    How to build VR interactives using Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data and Three.js

    Speakers: Armand Emamdjomeh of The Washington Post; Joe Fox of The Washington Post

    Lights, camera, liftoff! In this session we'll learn how to create a three-dimensional virtual reality scene using Three.js and terrain data from NASA.

    Using the L.A. Times' "Discovering Gale Crater" interactive, we'll walk you through how to import elevation data, turn a flat plane into a geographic surface, and map a terrain texture (basically a high-resolution photograph) onto that object. Then, we'll learn how to integrate controls for desktop and mobile devices and how to use pre-existing elements to turn the 3D scene into a virtual reality experience.

    We'll also look at ways people have riffed on this technique, including tracking a week in the life of a mountain lion in Griffith Park.

    City Terrace 8

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    How to bulletproof your data story

    Speakers: Jennifer Forsyth of The Wall Street Journal; Joel Engelhardt of The Palm Beach Post

    We walk through all the steps you need to take to make sure the data you've been slaving over for months cannot be dismissed by naysayers. We give managers the questions they should ask to help reporters think through their approach to data. And we sound warning bells for some of the most dangerous mistakes and assumptions that come up in using data in the newsroom.

    Conference Center B

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Python 2

    Speaker: Cathy Deng of independent journalist

    Want to upgrade your data skills? Come learn the Python programming language for a three-hour span. Geared toward beginners, this class with go over language basics and introduce you to key concepts. You'll then take your new Python skills and learn how to automate simple tasks, as well as how to collect and manipulate data in pursuit of stories.

     

    City Terrace 10

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Scraping data without coding

    Speakers: Hilary Niles of independent journalist; Samantha Sunne of independent journalist

    Scraping is a ​technical word for a traditional idea: getting ahold of information, whether or not your sources want you to. In this case, the information is data and the sources are websites. We'll go over some out-of-the-box tools for scraping data, plus some DIY techniques that often work even better.

     

    City Terrace 6

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    The agile data analyst: Applying practices from agile software methodologies to data reporting

    Speakers: Christopher Groskopf of Quartz; Rachel Shorey of The New York Times; Troy Thibodeaux of The Associated Press; Tyler Fisher of Temple University

    Software developers have spent a great deal of time and effort honing workflows that make their work easier, especially when they work in teams. Many of these best practices have been codified in the principles of Agile software development. Data reporters generally lack a shared set of conventions and practices, and that lack can make it tricky to share work and collaborate. This session will bring together news apps developers and reporters specializing in data-driven journalism to discuss what an agile workflow would look like on the reporting side. From iteration planning to time boxing to the DRY principle, we'll wring some sense from the buzz words and see which ones might make the work of data analysis more productive, more predictable and more fun.

    **Moderated by Troy Thibodeaux, The Associated Press

    Conference Center A

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    The first 100 days in data

    Speakers: Michael Corey of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Meghan Hoyer of The Associated Press; Margaret Janz of University of Pennsylvania; Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    The advent of a new administration always provides journalists with 100 new angles and reporting opportunities for keeping government officials accountable. In an administration that seems determined to make journalists the enemy, there are additional challenges. We'll look at some examples of stories in the first 100 days that use creative, often overlooked sources of information, and we'll talk about the movement to download data from government websites that may disappear (and where you can get your hands on some of that data). We'll also offer some tips and strategies for what to do when the data isn't there.

    **Moderated by Liz Lucas, Kaiser Health News

    River Terrace 3

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Using formulas in Excel

    Speaker: Dinah Pulver of The Daytona Beach News-Journal

    Have you missed trigonometry since high school? No? Didn't think so. We haven't either. But, we have learned formulas can be fun, fairly easy and extraordinarily helpful with Microsoft Excel. Join us for this session, Excel 2, and learn how you can make Microsoft do all your math for you, giving you all kinds of additional insight and statistics to make your stories stronger.

    City Terrace 11

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Demo

    Visualizing data with SandDance

    Speakers: Callie Neylan of Microsoft; Marilyn Harris of Microsoft

    SandDance is a research project from the Visualization and Interaction Team (VIBE) in Microsoft Research spearheaded by Steven M. Drucker and Roland Fernandez. It experiments with a new genre of visualizations, where every data element is always represented on the screen. By using easy-to-understand views, a touch-based interface, and animated transitions between views, SandDance helps you find insights about your data, which in turn help you tell stories supported by data, build cases based on evidence, test hypotheses, dig deeper into surface explanations, support decisions for purchases, or relate data into a wider, real world context.

    River Terrace 2

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Your newsroom has a drone. Now what?

    Speaker: Matt Waite of University of Nebraska - Lincoln

    Getting the drone is the easy part. Are you licensed? Insured? Does your newsroom have policies around use? What can you do with it beyond taking pictures? At the Drone Journalism Lab, we fought all these battles - and more - and can help you get your flying robot out of the box and in the air.

    City Terrace 12

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    A hitchhiker's guide To APIs

    Speaker: David Eads of ProPublica Illinois

    In this hands-on session, you will use Postman to interrogate a web API. David Eads (NPR) and Helga Salinas (Seattle Times) will guide you through the process of constructing a magic URL that will tell you how Chicago’s violent crime in 2016 compares to other years.

    This session is for beginners. If you’ve ever thought about what goes on in the location bar of your browser, have an eye for patterns, or want better ways to answer your reporting questions, you’ll have a blast.

    City Terrace 8

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced social media sleuthing

    Speaker: Steve Myers of Nieman Fellow

    Learn how to use social media tools to build profiles of people and their connections (and see what people can learn about you!)

     

    City Terrace 6

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Design track: Intermediate D3 (Sponsored by Society for News Design)

    Speakers: John Muyskens of The Washington Post; Leslie Shapiro of The Washington Post

    We’ll tackle some of the more complicated chart forms in D3, cover advanced data manipulation functions, and include tons of real-world examples of how you can turn your own data into D3 charts.

    City Terrace 5

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    Embrace the data! How to turn data into characters in your story

    Speakers: Madeleine Baran of American Public Media; Will Craft of APM Reports; Michael Corey of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

    A lot of reporters are afraid of losing people’s interest by using too many numbers in stories. But data can be just as engaging as any human character, if you know how to use it as a storyteller. Our panel will show you how to turn data into compelling characters that help drive the story, create tension and make people care. We will show you how even the most complicated data can be explored in ways that engage and surprise people. We’ll guide you through how APM Reports used data as a character in an investigative podcast, In the Dark. And we'll look at the dos and don'ts of data sonification to put data front and center. And we’ll show you how to incorporate the same techniques into other stories -- both for broadcast and print/online.

     

    River Terrace 3

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    How to make data approachable for younger audiences

    Speakers: Rachel Schallom of independent journalist; Ani Ucar of independent journalist

    Millennials - gotta catch 'em all. We'll tell you how to structure your data stories and interactives so younger audiences are drawn to your takeaways and will ultimately share with their friends.

    Conference Center A

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Python 3

    Speaker: Alex Richards of NerdWallet

    Want to upgrade your data skills? Come learn the Python programming language for a three-hour span. Geared toward beginners, this class with go over language basics and introduce you to key concepts. You'll then take your new Python skills and learn how to automate simple tasks, as well as how to collect and manipulate data in pursuit of stories.

    City Terrace 10

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating racial inequity (Sponsored by Ida B. Wells Society)

    Speakers: Nikole Hannah-Jones of The New York Times Magazine; Ron Nixon of The Associated Press

    Learn useful datasets, documents, and reporting tips for covering racial disparities and discrimination in housing, education, and law enforcement, among other things. 

     

    Conference Center B

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Demo

    Mining data from the social web (demo)

    Speakers: Lam Thuy Vo of BuzzFeed News; Cathy Deng of independent journalist

    From President Donald Trump’s Twitter account to fake news — social media platforms have become a major source for news.

    This demo session will give journalists the ability to harvest information from the social web in structured and automated ways. Participants will learn how to collect information from Facebook pages and Twitter accounts via scraping and APIs and turn them into spreadsheets.

    To get the most out of this demo: Attendees should have a basic grasp of programming concepts but do not need to be proficient in coding. Attendees should have their own Twitter and Facebook accounts and create app IDs for API access in advance of the session. If you want to follow along in this demonstration, make sure you have Python, pip and git installed on your laptop.

    River Terrace 2

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Special Event

    Open 3d sandbox

    Speakers: Joe Fox of The Washington Post; Armand Emamdjomeh of The Washington Post

    Make something in 3D in 10 minutes! We'll bring the basics for a three.js scene along with a bucket of assets so people can mix and match while learning how to build 3D interactives. Please bring your computer to this session.

    City Terrace 12

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    PivotTables in Excel

    Speaker: Kimbriell Kelly of Los Angeles Times

    A look at the awesome power of pivot - and how to use it to analyze your dataset in minutes rather than hours.

    This session will be most helpful if: You are familiar with formulas in Excel or another spreadsheet program.

    City Terrace 11

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Reception

    Welcome reception

    Kick off the conference with a welcome reception on Thursday night beginning at 6 p.m. Meet up with friends you have not seen since last year and welcome new attendees. Each attendee will receive one drink ticket for beer, wine, soda or bottled water.

    River Terrace 1

    6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

  • Special Event

    River Terrace 2

    7:45 am - 8:45 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference registration (Friday)

    Registration will be located on the 3rd floor Skybridge of the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront. 

    3rd floor - Skybridge

    8:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference sales (Friday)

    Stop by the NICAR Conference sales table and browse our merchandise, including the IRE bookstore's most popular titles and shirts with the winning design from the NICAR T-shirt contest. 

    3rd floor - Skybridge

    8:00 am - 5:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Excel Magic (beginner/intermediate) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: MaryJo Webster of Star Tribune

    If you've found yourself struggling in a spreadsheet, thinking that whatever you were trying to achieve seemed harder than it should've been, then this is the class for you. You'll learn how to do things with spreadsheets that you never thought possible, such as joining tables and re-arranging badly structured data. You'll learn about the never-ending and amazing power of logical functions, as well as a whole bunch of other functions you probably didn't know about (but should). You'll also learn some handy tools for dealing with dates, times and strings of text that aren't quite the way you'd like them. Plus we'll throw in some other tricks that just make working in spreadsheets a bit easier and more efficient. 

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training. 

    Workshop prerequisites: You should have prior experience using Excel or Google Sheets, and be comfortable with introductory-level spreadsheet skills, such as sorting, filtering, SUM and AVERAGE functions, calculations such as percentage change or percent of total, and how to use Pivot Tables.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    City Terrace 9

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    First Python Notebook: Rapid data analysis in the newsroom (beginner/intermediate) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: James Gordon of Reynolds Journalism Institute; Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University; Ben Welsh of Los Angeles Times

    
Ben Welsh, James Gordon and Cheryl Phillips teach you how to conduct and publish a data analysis with the Python programming language, its pandas toolkit and a Jupyter Notebook.



    The 6-hour, hands-on tutorial will guide you through an investigation of money in politics using data from the California Civic Data Coalition. You will learn just enough Python to do damage with the powerful pandas data analysis library, the most popular open-source library for working with large data files. You will also learn how to record, remix and republish your analysis using the Jupyter Notebook, a browser-based tool for writing code that is emerging as the standard for sharing reproducible research in the sciences. And most importantly, you will see how tools can increase the speed and veracity of your journalism.



    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.



    Workshop prerequisites: If you've tried Python once or twice, have good attitude and know how to take a few code crashes in stride, you are qualified for this class.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    City Terrace 4

    9:00 am - 4:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: How to be the caring human being behind the job posting (Sponsored by SRCCON - OpenNews)

    Speaker: Rachel Schallom of independent journalist

    Hiring is hard and time consuming. I believe that people want to have an intentional and caring hiring process, but it's easy for things to fall through the cracks. We'll talk about tangible solutions to make this process better.

    City Terrace 12

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Data crunching in Python (for people who only know Excel)

    Speaker: Cody Winchester of IRE and NICAR

    An intro-level session for people who are comfortable with spreadsheets but want to start working with data in Python.

    We won't be using pandas, Agate or any other popular data analysis libraries; instead, we'll focus on a few common Excel tasks and walk through basic data types and equivalent functionality in Python's standard library.

    (It's cool if you already know how to make a Python script go, but no big deal if you don't.)

    City Terrace 8

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    How to find stories in data: Data exploration and storytelling

    Speaker: Heather Krause of Datassist

    This session will introduce you to ways to use data as a source to tell stories. We’ll demonstrate techniques and tools to interrogate data for answers — gathering, cleaning, organizing and analyzing data to find and tell stories.

    The three topics we will focus on in this hour are:

    • Data Biographies: How to build one and why you should never write a data story without one.
    • Multivariate Exploratory Analysis: How to do this easily in Tableau and why it’s much better than simply looking at two variables and calling it a relationship.
    • Ecological Fallacy: What this really means and how to avoid it in data stories.

    City Terrace 6

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    How to use polls and rankings – and how to tell the good from bad

    Speakers: Matt Carmichael of Ipsos; Chris Jackson of Ipsos; Peter Gade of University of Oklahoma

    Quick survey: how many of you are inundated with press releases about polls, rankings, and best-of lists? You know your readers love that kind of thing, but you don’t want to mislead them with bad data or overstating the results. Maybe the election has you questioning its value in general. We’ll give you the tools you need to quickly sort out what’s worth covering. But let’s go further: You’ll see some real-life examples of even more interesting ways to incorporate this data into your story-telling and reporting.

     

    River Terrace 1

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to R: Stepping up your analysis game (beginner)

    Speaker: Charles Minshew of IRE and NICAR

    City Terrace 10

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    The lone trainer: Ideas for boosting data literacy in your newsroom

    Speakers: Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop; Ronald Campbell of NBC Owned Television Stations

    Conference Center B

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    The perils, pitfalls and payoffs of working with higher ed data (Sponsored by Lumina Foundation)

    Speakers: Jennifer Forsyth of The Wall Street Journal; Holly Hacker of The Dallas Morning News

    With college costs at record levels, and student debt topping $1.2 trillion, data on colleges is more critical than ever before. In the last year alone, colleges have been at the crux of major national controversies including sexual assault on campus, the rights of undocumented students, and tensions over political speech. This panel will take you through several major higher education data sets that will help you tell those stories. We'll explore data on student debt, campus demographics, and campus crime and talk about the pros and cons of using each data set.

    River Terrace 3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Uncovering the influence

    Speakers: Sandra Fish of independent journalist; Ben Wieder of McClatchy; Derek Willis of ProPublica

    The 2016 election may be over, but what happens after the elected take office? That’s when following the money can really pay off. What legislation will help big contributors? What are the lobbyists behind big money working – and spending – on? From the statehouse to Congress, now is the time to examine the relationships between campaign donors and what lawmakers do.

     

    Conference Center A

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Visualization and analysis in Python

    Speakers: Nathaniel Lash of The Philadelphia Inquirer; Adam Playford of Tampa Bay Times

    So you're familiar with Python and some of its core concepts. How do you use that to crunch large amounts of data and records into stories and data visualizations quickly and easily? In this hands-on course, we'll show you our tips and tricks in using our favorite Python tools to do just that. You’ll walk out knowing how to go from analysis to publishable graphics in just a few minutes. The tools we'll be using: Seaborn (statistical data viz library), matplotlib (plotting library), pandas (data analysis tool), and Jupyter notebooks.

    City Terrace 7

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    When Excel is not enough, you SQL

    Speaker: Crina Boros of independent journalist

    What do you do when Excel is too slow or restrictive for your data analysis but advanced coding is still a steep mountain to climb? This is when SQL, the lingua franca of database managers, will power up your data-driven reporting. These 3 hands-on introductory workshops will focus on SQL's main statements and learning how to join tables for a fuller analysis.

    City Terrace 11

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    Kiss your apps goodbye: Saving born-digital news

    Speaker: Edward McCain of Reynolds Journalism Institute

    The longevity of digital news content is about the same as the lifespan of an earthworm - about 100 days. As founder of the Dodging the Memory Hole initiative, digital curator of journalism Edward McCain is working to ensure long-term access to journalistic content. In today’s digital newsrooms, a software or hardware crash can wipe out decades of texts, photos, videos and applications. Furthermore, digital archives can become obsolete if they aren’t adapted to evolving formats and systems. A 2014 study by the Reynolds Journalism Institute shows that 17 percent of online-only organizations have already experienced just this kind of damage. Come learn how to keep your content alive and accessible for future generations.

     

    River Terrace 2

    9:30 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Brain flipping: Tips for switching between the sides of your brain

    Speakers: Leah Kohlenberg of Art for Journalists; Scott Pham of BuzzFeed News; Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    Working with data means that many of us are flipping our brains between analytical tasks, such as coding and querying and more creative tasks, such as writing and designing.This session will give you some tools for helping both sides of your brain do a better job.

    Telling narratives in data investigations stories with data – or maybe, some of the best narrative stories by people who also work with data.

    **Moderated by Jennifer LaFleur, Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting

    Conference Center A

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Broadcast: Transforming data into knockout visuals

    Speakers: Mc Nelly Torres of independent journalist; Josh Hinkle of KXAN/NBC Austin; Cecil Rosner of CBC

    This session will teach you how to use data to produce interactive graphics that play well in a broadcast story and a digital project. We’ll discuss how projects have been conceived, challenges we encountered and successes achieved to produce data-driven work that can play in both digital and television. The goal is to create a culture that thinks ahead of the curve to make presentations that matter for your audience.  

     

    River Terrace 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Common foundations for newsroom tools

    Speakers: Allan James Vestal of The Dallas Morning News; Chris Amico of FRONTLINE; Daniele Palumbo of BBC News; Casey Miller of Los Angeles Times

    How can we build open-source newsroom tools that don’t get hung up on organizational differences? One of the biggest challenges to making tools that work across organizations is handling how different each newsroom can be.

    Our panelists have built a number of tools for their newsrooms and others. We'll go over what we learned, how we handled obstacles and suggest some best practices to get as many users as possible. Then we’ll explore what standardizing tools across organizations could mean for newsrooms — from small to large.

    River Terrace 1

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Open source in the newsroom (Sponsored by SRCCON - OpenNews)

    Speakers: Lindsay Muscato of OpenNews; Erin Kissane of OpenNews; Ryan Pitts of OpenNews

    At OpenNews, we're working on a community-written guidebook to tackle a mutual challenge: how to produce open source projects. We've seen a common set of cultural and technical questions coming up before, during, and after projects--but our community doesn't have a common pool of answers. More open source software means more time for meaningful journalism, less time spent recreating code. In this conversation, we'll talk about this new guidebook, share expertise with each other around open source in the newsroom, and ask how this resource could be helpful to you and your colleagues.

    City Terrace 12

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Data analysis in R (beginner)

    Speaker: Peter Aldhous of BuzzFeed News

    Learn how to sort, filter, join and carry out some other basic functions in R to identify trends in your data for storytelling.

     

    City Terrace 10

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Designing database applications for community engagement (Hosted by Caspio)

    Speakers: Jennifer Christos of Caspio, Inc.; Sabina Tuladhar of Caspio, Inc.

    Investigative journalists have great ideas, and many are seeking fast, innovative solutions that allow them to publish interactive data applications by deadline. Caspio has the tools to allow you to do this, without the help of a staff developer.

    With a little bit of training, you can learn how to develop your own data-driven apps, interactives, consumer investigative sites, and community engagement tools using Caspio.

    This demo will showcase real-world examples and techniques for building revenue-generating database applications. Creative community engagement has never been easier.

    Note: Pre-registration is not required.

    City Terrace 7

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    Gifs for data viz

    Speaker: Lena Groeger of ProPublica

    Let’s take a look at why animated gifs work so well as explanatory tools; what kinds of charts, graphics, and data visualizations they’re best for; and how you can make your very own.

    River Terrace 2

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Github for journos (repeat session)

    Speaker: Hector Alfaro of GitHub

    What is Git? What is GitHub? Why should I care? In this session, we’ll answer these questions and tap into why developers think GitHub is the best collaboration platform in the world. You'll learn how to navigate your way around GitHub.com and use it to find incredible projects.

    City Terrace 6

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Show me the money: Finding compensation gold in proxy statements

    Speaker: Jeff Ostrowski of The Palm Beach Post

    Want to quickly calculate how much Warren Buffett is worth? Wondering how much Mark Zuckerberg pays himself? The answers are readily available for those who know where to look. In filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, thousands of publicly traded companies (and even some companies that don’t trade on a stock exchange) reveal a wealth of information about executive pay, perks and stock holdings. This hands-on session will show you where to find compensation data for companies you cover.

    City Terrace 8

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Outside Event

    Show them your everything: Optimizing data journalism for trust (Hosted by Knight Foundation)

    Speakers: Aron Pilhofer of Temple University; Ryan Murphy of The Texas Tribune; Cecilia Reyes of Chicago Tribune; Jenny Ye of WNYC - New York Public Radio

    **Moderated by Aron Pilhofer, Temple University

    One of the most powerful ways newsrooms can increase readers’ trust in media is transparency -- show your work, in other words. This panel will explore ways newsrooms can be more open about how they did what they did, the methodology they used, the tools, the techniques and the raw data behind it.

    Hart, 4th Floor (4106)

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    The present and future of bots

    Speakers: John Keefe of Quartz; Simon Rogers of Google; Ken Schwencke of ProPublica; Tiff Fehr of The New York Times

    Expectations are very high in 2017 for bots, artificial intelligence and their usefulness to journalism.  But the definitions and boundaries between types of bots are murky at best.  Few journalistic bots are alike (if you don't count their clones).  And each newsroom's needs for bots are often unique.  Our panel of bot-builders will lead you on a guided tour of bots past, present and future.

    **Moderated by Tiff Fehr, The New York Times

    Conference Center B

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Beyond objectivity - New standards for building trust in journalism (Sponsored by SRCCON - OpenNews)

    Speaker: Geoff Hing of APM Reports

    Ida B. Wells reported on lynchings through simple, clear questions and a systematic collection and analysis of data. However, Wells could not report on racist violence from a detached vantage point. She had friends who were murdered and was herself exiled from her home in Memphis after her newspaper's office was ransacked and her life was threatened. Many buying homes or choosing schools for their children, including reporters and editors, are implicated in systems intertwined with race, class and politics. However, few acknowledge that they aren't detached from these systems. Last year, Nikole Hannah-Jones used her background reporting about race, segregation and education to show how [her own experience choosing a school for her daughter](https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/12/magazine/choosing-a-school-for-my-daughter-in-a-segregated-city.html?_r=0) exemplified broader issues in American education. Lewis Wallace, a reporter for Marketplace, reported being fired after publishing an [essay](https://medium.com/@lewispants/objectivity-is-dead-and-im-okay-with-it-7fd2b4b5c58f#.yzkh8bigt) questioning the reality of standards of objectivity and neutrality in news and surfacing the struggles he faces as a trans person who is specifically affected by policy.

    Let's start by accepting that objectivity and neutrality aren't real and that there is a crisis of audience trust in reporting. Let's also aknowledge that reporters and editors are consciously or unconciously implicated in many of the dynamics on which they cover, yet still do rigorous work. Finally, let's agree that not everyone in a newsroom is impacted by newsworthy events in the same way.

    From this starting point, let's talk about different standards that journalists are developing, either in their own practice, or at their organizations to address our personal implications in the news. How can or should reporters disclose their connections or orientations? What are the implications, if any, if reporters participate in protests or donate to causes? How have reporters taken political actions but remained fair and truthful in the reporting? What were the times when this wasn't possible? From this conversation, I hope we can develop sets of standards, personal and organizational that prioritize both our humanity and the integrity of our journalism. 

    City Terrace 12

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Data analysis in Tableau

    Speaker: Sarah Ryley of The Trace

    Tableau Desktop is a powerful data analysis tool that can crunch large datasets entirely with a visual interface and with more flexibility than SQL. This session will teach you how to join tables, query, group and filter, and visualize the results by simply dragging, dropping and clicking (okay, and a little typing). The software is free for IRE members.

    City Terrace 6

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Data wrangling with Python

    Speaker: Anthony DeBarros of The Wall Street Journal

    Much of the prerequisite for analysis involves loading, transforming, and storing data. We'll dig into Python libraries that are useful for reading from and writing to various data formats, including databases. Familiarity with Python and SQL is helpful but not essential.

    City Terrace 8

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Doing data journalism under duress

    Speakers: Anatoliy Bondarenko of Texty.org.ua; Rigoberto Carvajal of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Eva Constantaras of Internews; Charles Lewis of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    **Moderated by Charles Lewis, Investigative Reporting Workshop

    Conference Center B

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Gathering and cleaning data with R (intermediate)

    Speaker: Caelainn Barr of The Guardian

    Learn how to use R to scrape data from the web and pull data from APIs. This session will also look at how to clean and structure the data you've gathered in preparation for your analysis using tidyverse packages. Please note: You will need an API key for Zillow, so please sign up for one prior to this class.

    City Terrace 10

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    GIS with Python: 6 libraries to know

    Speaker: Roberto Rocha of CBC

    River Terrace 2

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Google trends

    Speaker: Jennifer Lee of Google News Lab

    Turning trends into stories

    Google Trends data can be a reflection of our collective curiosities. This data can be a powerful signal in reporting, as we’ve seen spikes in search interest showcasing how people are processing major events, and questions searched indicating what folks want to know most.

    Join us as we discuss how to use Google Trends--whether it’s to discover your next story or to enrich and amplify one you’re currently working on.

    City Terrace 7

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Jobs and career straight-talk: For (and by) young'uns only

    Speakers: Madi Alexander of Bloomberg Government; Rachel Schallom of independent journalist

    River Terrace 3

    11:30 am - 1:30 pm

  • Outside Event

    Hart, 4th Floor (4106)

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Managing data projects & workflows

    Speakers: Matt Goldberg of NBCUniversal; Aron Pilhofer of Temple University; Janet Roberts of Reuters

    Large data projects can be a large pain in the neck and often require more planning and structure than is typical in most newsrooms. On this panel, we will discuss different approaches to managing large-scale data projects, what has worked and what hasn't. 

    **Moderated by Matt Goldberg, NBC4 Los Angeles

    River Terrace 1

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Visualizing and understanding uncertainty (Sponsored by Society for News Design)

    Speakers: Alberto Cairo of University of Miami; Jen Christiansen of Scientific American; Mark Hansen of Columbia Journalism School

    Information graphics trigger an illusion of certainty, precision and even control over the situation they describe. But how often do we, as infographics and data visualization designers, really think deeply about whether most readers understand that the line in a time-series line chart has a fuzzy cloud of uncertainty behind it? Or if the 63.3 percent probability of winning a football game that we're reporting on could be rounded to 60 percent, and more clearly expressed as a 3 out of 5 chances? In some cases, statistics, as a discipline, can help us work out margins of error, but in other cases, the mathematics is frustratingly silent about the best strategy for expressing a range of plausible outcomes. How do we give data their wobble back? Join us in a conversation about the challenges of visualizing uncertainty in figures developed for broad audiences, and strategies for representing it effectively.

    Conference Center A

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: If newsrooms had Hogwarts personalities (Sponsored by SRCCON - OpenNews)

    Speakers: Christine Zhang of Baltimore Sun; Gerald Rich of Axios; Jeremy Bowers of The New York Times; Casey Miller of Los Angeles Times

    In "Harry Potter," students at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry are sorted into four houses: Gryffindor (the brave), Ravenclaw (the clever), Hufflepuff (the loyal), and Slytherin (the ambitious). This can be a useful framework for understanding personality clashes (and synergies) in the workplace. As House representatives, we* will take a Hogwartsian perspective on common newsroom issues. We will encourage participants to discover and discuss their own Hogwarts identities by taking the online quiz. 

    *"we" are Gerald Rich (Axios, Gryffindor) - also identifies as Ravenclaw. sore loser in a Harry Potter costume competition (http://www.pinoyexchange.com/forums/printthread.php?t=478749&pp=20&page=170) 

    Christine Zhang (OpenNews/freelance, Ravenclaw) - gave a lightning talk at MozFest 2016 on "what Harry Potter taught me about journalism" (https://twitter.com/christinezhang/status/792421131647082496) 

    Jeremy Bowers (NYT, Hufflepuff) - gave a lightning talk at SRCCON 2016 on "Why you should hire Hufflepuffs" (https://datanews.github.io/blitzen/) 

    Casey Miller (Vox, Slytherin) - surveyed her co-workers about which Hogwarts House they thought each other belonged to -- and compared expectations with reality (https://storytelling.voxmedia.com/2016/9/23/13037226/how-our-remote-team-makes-time-to-bond)

    City Terrace 12

    12:45 pm - 1:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Digging into data for stories: A crash course (beginner) *pre-registered attendees only

    Kickstart your data skills with IRE's original mini-boot camp. This series of hands-on classes will introduce you to spreadsheets and databases with IRE's proven techniques. IRE's experienced trainers will walk you through sorting, calculating and interviewing data. You'll come away with a solid base for using data analysis in your own newsroom. In addition, we'll provide you with our boot camp materials to help keep you on track long after you leave the conference.  

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.


    Workshop prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this workshop and beginners are welcome. This workshop is good for those wanting to get started analyzing data for stories

    Workshop times are Friday, March 3, 2:15pm - 4:30pm; Saturday, March 4, 2:15pm - 5:45pm; Sunday, March 5, 9:00am - 12:30pm (Note: Registration for this session reserves your seat for all days of this workshop and attendees are expected to attend all sessions to complete the workshop.)

    **Speakers are IRE/NICAR Staff

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    City Terrace 10/11

    2:15 pm - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced PDF manipulation

    Speaker: Miguel Barbosa of CitizenAudit

    So now you know how to get data from basic pdfs and large batches. What about mixed formats, ongoing jobs etc? 

    This session will cover how to process pdfs in large batches, use Amazon Mechanical Turk, schedule OCR jobs to work while you aren't around, and build data pipeline. If you’re comfortable with the command line and Tesseract this is for you. 

    City Terrace 5

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Basic D3 (repeat session)

    Speakers: Chris Canipe of Axios; Jon McClure of POLITICO

    We’ll cover the basics of getting you started with D3, even if you’ve never used it before. Then we’ll take several real datasets and use them to create a few basic charts.

    City Terrace 8

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Data to localize housing and economy stories

    Speakers: Skylar Olsen of Zillow; Keith Taylor of Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

    Keith will discuss finding, graphing, mapping, and sharing economic data from the St. Louis Fed’s free website FRED.  Attendees will leave the session able to find economic data by U.S. region such as state, metropolitan area, or county; create multi-series graphs and maps to compare indicators by geography; and download data.  Keith will also cover embedding graphs and maps in stories, saving frequently used graphs, and creating dashboards.  Dashboards are custom webpages created by the user that contain automatically updating data as graphs, tables, and data points.

    River Terrace 2

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Design track: Interactive design (Sponsored by Society for News Design)

    Speaker: Sarah Slobin of Reuters

    You understand the data. You've wrangled the map. You know what the story is. Where does information design come into that process? Design is logic, but like anything else, if no one explains it to you it can be a complete mystery. 

    Just like learning a few key words when you travel to another country, there are a few design principles that can help you think about how to present your data or how to tighten your design for your reader. We'll look at the worst design ever and I'll share some ways to look at a user interface -- once you know them these ways of LOOKING you'll never be able to unsee them.

    City Terrace 7

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Exploring environmental data

    Speakers: Dianne Finch of Kent State University; David Heath of The Information; Dinah Pulver of The Daytona Beach News-Journal

    We'll look at primary data related to marine science--with a focus on coral reef research. We'll look at how scientists collect data from the ocean, and what it looks like once collected. The point of the session is to "know your data," and in this case the data is all about the ocean. In addition, I'll be showing some data on fresh water that I received from Mark Nichols, who couldn't attend. We'll provide some samples to participants.

    David will be showing data related to toxins in the environment. Dinah will talk about her work as an environmental journalist. You'll receive more details from them.

    All three of us will provide links to useful sites for locating environmental data.

    River Terrace 1

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Fighting First Amendment attacks

    Speaker: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR

    In this freewheeling open-mic session, the audience will share tactics to overcome attacks on First Amendment rights, including access to public records, data, documents and meetings. Bring your practical tips, success stories and tools to share. We'll crowdsource proven ways to overcome obstacles to getting the sources, data and documents you need.

    **Moderated by Doug Haddix, IRE/NICAR

    Conference Center B

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    QGIS I: Importing and displaying geographic data

    Speakers: John Walton of BBC News; Christine Jeavans of BBC News

    Not all datasets need to be mapped, but some do! This mapping class is perfect for beginners looking to learn the basics of visualizing geographic data. We'll go over how to find publicly available data, prepare it for mapping, join datasets and use the open source mapping software, QGIS.

    City Terrace 9

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Scraping data without coding (repeat session)

    Speaker: Sydney Lupkin of Kaiser Health News

    Scraping is a ​technical word for a traditional idea: getting ahold of information, whether or not your sources want you to. In this case, the information is data and the sources are websites. We'll go over some out-of-the-box tools for scraping data, plus some DIY techniques that often work even better.

     

    City Terrace 6

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Unsung data

    Speakers: Dan Keating of The Washington Post; Jeremy Singer-Vine of BuzzFeed News

    What makes a dataset sing? And what great datasets are underappreciated? Join us for a (totally subjective) romp through some of our favorites. We’ll look at data that have been used for award-winning, customized, sophisticated, localized, timely information — many with no programming, no software and no downloading needed.  A quick step-by-step guide to using them.

    River Terrace 3

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Watch the web for news tips with Klaxon

    Speaker: Tom Meagher of The Marshall Project

    Built in The Marshall Project's nonprofit, investigative newsroom, Klaxon is a free program that alerts journalists to newsworthy updates to sites on the web. At this session, you'll learn how to quickly and easily set up Klaxon in your newsroom and how to use it in your reporting. 

    City Terrace 12

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    What's the impact?

    Speakers: Lindsay Green-Barber of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting; Celeste LeCompte of ProPublica; Tom Rosenstiel of American Press Institute; James Hamilton of Stanford University

    **Moderated by James Hamilton, Stanford University

    Investigative stories can change lives and laws, draw audiences, and generate new leads and partnerships. How can you put numbers on these impacts? This panel will try, through discussion of evidence from readership metrics, benefit-cost analyses, survey data, and case studies.

     

    Conference Center A

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Co-op models in data journalism

    Speaker: Forest Gregg of DataMade

    Individual newsrooms duplicate a lot of work in the mundane collection and preparation of data. If we can cooperate, we can save money and take on more ambitious projects. But, cooperation with competitors is hard. In this conversation we will share experiences of folks who have attempted to build cooperative data efforts amongst organizations -- what has worked and what hasn't.

    City Terrace 12

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Collaborating with the competition

    Speakers: Crina Boros of independent journalist; Sandhya Kambhampati of Los Angeles Times; Jeff Kelly Lowenstein of Grand Valley State University; Ben Wieder of McClatchy

    Working with a rival news organization might seem like one of the great journalism no-nos, but successful collaborations can be a way for newsrooms around the country -- and the globe -- to combine their individual strengths and produce higher impact work than each organization could achieve on its own. Learn strategies and tools that will make it easier to play nice with the competition, produce awesome, data-driven investigations and take over the world.

    **Moderated by Ben Wieder, The Center for Public Integrity

    River Terrace 3

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Data & abuse of power

    Speakers: Anna Flagg of The Marshall Project; Moiz Syed of The Intercept

    We need data on public institutions so that we can keep them accountable. But when that data is collected and shared by the institution itself, they are in a powerful position to control the narrative. What can we as data practitioners do to help identify potentially biased narratives that could exist in this type of data? Because blindly trusting a biased dataset is just as harmful as blindly trusting a biased source. We would like to talk a little about a vetting process, and about a few important types of biases in data that you should have in mind. This list is by no means complete and is still a work in progress, but it includes some of the more major types of bias that we’ve noticed in data, and what we think you can do about them.

    Conference Center B

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Demo

    Data journalism from space

    Speaker: Sara Schnadt of Planet

    For decades, time-sensitive satellite imagery has been expensive and accessible mostly to governments and large corporations. Recent advances in consumer technologies are making satellite technology cheaper, and new business models are making the production of space-bound hardware and imagery more democratized. Planet Labs, a startup founded by ex-NASA engineers, has the largest constellation of Earth-imaging satellites ever and aims to image the entire planet every day to track global events and challenges like climate change, deforestation, refugee camp growth, disaster response, and many others. The high frequency of Planet's imagery creates new opportunities to capture insight on significant local and global change and is able to move at the rapid rate of today’s 24-hour news cycle. Recent stories include coverage of deforestation in Bolivia, illegal gold mining in Peru, a collapsing glacier, and discovery of North Korean missile tests. As a unique source of data, Planet's imagery is available to approved journalists and socially-impactful projects.

     

    River Terrace 2

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Design track: User testing - Gathering insight to make better stories (Sponsored by Society for News Design)

    Speakers: Hannah Birch of ProPublica; Clarisa Diaz of WNYC - New York Public Radio

    Is your story clear? Do people see that search field? Does that button work the way you think it does? Find out how to answer these questions by talking to a few outside people. It’s easy, it’s cheap, and it works. Bonus: Bring a project you’re working on and learn how to test it.

    City Terrace 7

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intermediate D3 (repeat session)

    Speakers: Chris Canipe of Axios; Jon McClure of POLITICO

    We’ll tackle some of the more complicated chart forms in D3, cover advanced data manipulation functions, and include tons of real-world examples of how you can turn your own data into D3 charts.

    City Terrace 8

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to Javascript

    Speaker: Chris Essig of The Texas Tribune

    Functions, for loops and objects. They can be confusing at first but once you master these and other Javascript coding conventions, you'll be able to build fancy data visualizations and more. In this course, we will be learning the basics of Javascript. No coding experience is necessary.

     

    City Terrace 5

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    News games and simulations

    Speakers: Amanda Hickman of Factful; Sandeep Junnarkar of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

    Most forms of Web journalism take long-existing news media formats like video, audio, photographs and transfer them to the Web. We'll instead look at how audiences can engage with news developments and complex policy stories by using games and quizzes as a form of interactive storytelling. Amanda Hickman, the director of BuzzFeed's Open Lab for Journalism, Technology, and the Arts; and Sandeep Junnarkar, the director of Interactive Journalism at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, will explore what types of stories lend themselves to game/quiz projects, and then help you conceptualize the basics of building news games and quizzes that make complex policies more accessible to audiences.

    Conference Center A

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Phil Meyer Award winners deep dives

    Speakers: Jeff Ernsthausen of ProPublica; Scott Pham of BuzzFeed News; Eric Sagara of Big Local News; John Templon of BuzzFeed News; Jodi Upton of Syracuse University

    The winners of the Philip Meyer Award take you behind the scenes and offer insights, tips, and strategies that helped them pull off their award-winning work. These projects included a sophisticated data investigation that revealed doctors who had sexually abused their patients; an innovative tracking system showing how wildfires spread in the West; and a data-driven investigation that exposed match-fixing in professional tennis.

    **Moderated by Jodi Upton, Syracuse University

    River Terrace 1

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    QGIS II: Manipulating, editing and analyzing geographic data

    Speaker: Alexandra Kanik of Louisville Public Media

    Dive even deeper into data mapping in this continuation of QGIS I. This class will cover joining data tables to maps, aggregating point data for easier analysis and preparing geographic data for display online. It is strongly recommended that you take QGIS I immediate preceding this session, but it is not a strict requirement.

    City Terrace 9

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Reproducibility and Rmarkdown: How to use R regularly in your newsroom (intermediate)

    Speaker: Andrew Tran of The Washington Post

    Learn how to turn your most commonly created custom lines of R code into a function and package for future use. Communicate your findings to others in the newsroom easily with R Markdown. Share all to your Github repo through RStudio for others to download and use or update.

    City Terrace 6

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Lightning Talks (Sponsored by the Knight Foundation)

    **Moderated by Sisi Wei, ProPublica

    Sometimes you don't need 45 minutes to explain a useful technique or interesting resource. Join your colleagues for a session of short (5-minute) talks about doing CAR, Web development or other related topics. 

    1. CAR through the ages: what I learned from collecting every single NICAR program since 1990 — Christine Zhang
    2. Subverting the story model in the age of Trump — Tyler Fisher
    3. Stuff I've said to FOIA officers to get them to give me ... well, stuff — Cezary Podkul
    4. What I learned by submitting the same FOIA more than 1,000 times — Steven Rich
    5. Self-care for Nerds — Aditi Bhandari
    6. How to collaborate when no one understands what you do — Caelainn Barr
    7. Everything I Wasted Time Worrying About as A Newbie Coder — Kate Rabinowitz
    8. Using Uber's open data to understand cities — Cory Kendrick
    9. 58 stupid things we learned from mapping all 25,000 of California's election precincts — Joe Fox
    10. Literally Everything The New York Times Knows About Elections — Jeremy Bowers

    Conference Center A&B

    4:45 pm - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Philip Meyer Award Presentation & David Donald Remembrance

    The presentation of the 2016 Philip Meyer Journalism Awards will take place on Friday at the 2017 CAR Conference in Jacksonville. The awards recognize the best uses of social research methods in journalism and are named in honor of Philip Meyer, author of “Precision Journalism” and retired Knight Chair in Journalism and UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communications. 

    Three awards are given annually — a first, second and third place — to recognize the best work using techniques that are part of precision journalism, computer-assisted reporting and social science research. The awards are: $500 for first, $300 for second, and $200 for third.

    Then, join us for a brief tribute to former IRE training director and Philip Meyer Award winner David Donald, who passed away December.

    Conference Center A&B

    6:00 pm - 6:45 pm

  • Reception

    Philip Meyer Award Reception

    Join fellow CAR attendees in celebrating the Philip Meyer Award Winners at a reception Friday night with light hor d'oeuvres and a cash bar beginning at 6:45 p.m. in River Terrace 1.

    River Terrace 1

    6:45 pm - 7:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference registration (Saturday)

    Registration will be located on the 3rd floor Skybridge of the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront. 

    3rd floor - Skybridge

    8:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Special Event

    Conference sales (Saturday)

    Stop by the NICAR Conference sales table and browse our merchandise, including the IRE bookstore's most popular titles and shirts with the winning design from the NICAR T-shirt contest. 

    3rd floor - Skybridge

    8:30 am - 6:00 pm

  • Hands-on

    Build your first news app (intermediate) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Armand Emamdjomeh of The Washington Post; Ben Welsh of Los Angeles Times

    This mini-boot camp will walk you through the process of building a simple online news application from a dataset. You will get hands-on experience in every stage of the development process, writing Python, HTML and JavaScript using version control tools. You won't stop until you've deployed a working application onto the World Wide Web.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    Workshop prerequisites: If you have a good attitude and know how to take a few code crashes in stride, you are qualified for this class.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    City Terrace 4

    9:00 am - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Intro to R (intermediate) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speaker: Charles Minshew of IRE and NICAR

    
Add statistical heft to your reporting by using R, a free, powerful open-source programming language. By the end of this two-hour session, you will be able to take raw data, import it into R, and start your analysis. Topics will include basic data importing, working with directories, reading in data, installing packages, creating simple visualizations, and how to clean, explore and sort your data. We'll also talk about how to find help when you're stuck.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.
 


    Workshop prerequisites: This session will be most helpful if you’re comfortable working with data and you’re ready to take your skills to the next level.


    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    City Terrace 9

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced analysis in SQL

    Speaker: Meghan Hoyer of The Associated Press

    If you feel comfortable with the Structured Query Language basics that IRE teaches in its boot camps -- SELECT, FROM, WHERE, GROUP BY -- but are ready to see what else SQL can do, this session is for you. We will cover more advanced ways of manipulating and questioning data, such as UPDATE queries, joins, writing sub-queries, and other neat tricks.  We will use SQLite.

    City Terrace 10

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Breaking through the Facebook wall: Reporting on Facebook using components of Facebook

    Speakers: Julia Angwin of ProPublica; Jon Keegan of Tow Center - Columbia University; Jeremy Merrill of Quartz

    Conference Center B

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Let's chat journalism and technology fellowships! Bring your questions and ideas (Sponsored by SRCCON - OpenNews)

    Speakers: Amanda Hickman of Factful; Erika Owens of OpenNews

    If you've ever thought about applying for a journalism-tech fellowship, join us to chat about the application process. Learn about applying to the Knight-Mozilla Fellowship or the BuzzFeed Open Lab, or just talk through what makes a fellowship application strong.

    City Terrace 12

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Demo

    Drawing for a better brain

    Speaker: Leah Kohlenberg of Art for Journalists

    Can learning to draw improve your writing and reporting skills?  Can you, a reporter good with words who can only draw a stick figure, learn to draw?  Yes you can!  To prove it, come take this hour-long drawing lesson from a Time Magazine reporter/writer turned professional artist and art teacher.  You'll walk away with a finished drawing, and a newfound understanding of how exercising the right side of your brain will help you in your professional life.  All materials provided, no drawing experience necessary.

    River Terrace 2

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Extracting data from PDFs (repeat session)

    Speaker: Miguel Barbosa of CitizenAudit

    Learn how to use tools for extracting text from documents. The seminar will discuss the fundamentals of knowing the best tool for the job, a walk-through using online web applications, and an introduction to cracking tough cases using Optical Character Recognition (OCR). For questions before or after the course, please email Acton Gorton (actongorton@gmail.com). 

    City Terrace 5

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Geocoding addresses

    Speaker: Michael Corey of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

    If you've had to place many addresses on a map before, you know how problematic bulk geocoding can be -- technical issues, terms of service, fun, fun fun! If you've never had the pleasure, don't worry, we'll show you how to happily (and correctly) geocode large sets of addresses.

     

    City Terrace 8

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to database manager MySQL I

    Speaker: Ronald Campbell of NBC Owned Television Stations

    We’ll show you how to import files into MySQL, a powerful open-source database manager. You’ll use SQL to sort, query and add new fields to make sense of the data.

    This session is good for: Anyone with basic spreadsheet or database skills.

    City Terrace 11

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Marrying documents and data

    Speakers: Steven Rich of The Washington Post; Francisco Vara-Orta of IRE and NICAR; Brooke Williams of Boston University; Tom McGinty of The Wall Street Journal

    It may feel at times like a chicken-versus-egg style debate in how to approach the incorporation of both data and documents in assembling a solid in-depth project. But learning how to have each play each chunk of information off of one another can really bolster the work. This panel will discuss how they’ve approached this and highlight stories from various publications that relied heavily on both data and documents as an effective strategy to improve reporting, as well as discuss what tools can be used to put together such potent pairings.

     

    River Terrace 3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Securing data and communications

    Speaker: Jorge Luis Sierra of Border Center for Journalists and Bloggers

    Are your sources’ identities at risk? Are you handling sensitive information? Do you need to protect your data from digital espionage? Do you need to encrypt your communication with editors and sources? Are you under technical attack? In two hours, your information security skills will go to the next level. Use a digital security toolbox and learn how to store, send and receive sensitive information. Bring your computers and mobile phones, and enjoy a cryptoparty at NICAR 2017!

    River Terrace 1

    9:00 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Simple ways to create immersive news stories

    Speakers: Joe Fox of The Washington Post; Shaheryar Popalzai of International Center for Journalists; Stuart Thompson of The Wall Street Journal

    Conference Center A

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Stats: An introduction

    Speaker: Holly Hacker of The Dallas Morning News

    You know how to do sums and averages in Excel. What's next? Learn how to use other statistical tools in Excel, from standard deviations to correlations to t-tests.

    City Terrace 6

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Under pressure: Real life in real time with breaking news

    Speakers: Noah Pransky of independent journalist; Nicole Vap of KUSA/9News Denver

    City Terrace 7

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    A roundup of international CAR

    Speakers: Marianne Bouchart of Data Journalism Awards; Rigoberto Carvajal of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists; Helena Bengtsson of Sveriges Television

    How is data journalism done in Norway - in Costa Rica - or in Cameroon? What are the trends and stories done outside of the US? See what journalists around the world are doing - and maybe you can steal a story idea or two to take home. 

    **Moderated by Helena Bengtsson, The Guardian

    Conference Center B

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Advanced PDF manipulation (repeat session)

    Speaker: Jacob Fenton of independent journalist

    So now you know how to get data from basic pdfs and large batches. What about mixed formats, ongoing jobs etc? 

     

    This session will cover how to process pdfs in large batches, use Amazon Mechanical Turk, schedule OCR jobs to work while you aren't around, and build data pipeline. If you’re comfortable with the command line and Tesseract this is for you. 

    City Terrace 8

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Behind the scenes: Electionland

    Speakers: John Keefe of Quartz; Scott Klein of ProPublica; Olivia Ma of Google News Lab

    On November 8, 2016, an unprecedented collaboration of journalists, technologists and students worked together to cover the voting experience in America. Using a combination of real-time data, social media and crowdsourcing, Electionland had eyes across the country looking for voting problems, voter intimidation, and yes, even whether the election was rigged. With 1,100 participants, it was the largest journalistic collaboration in history around a single event. How did Electionland come about? How did it work? What lessons can news organizations learn about taking part in -- and hatching -- large-scale collaborations? 

    Conference Center A

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Special Event

    Conversations: Feeling defeated? You're not the only one (Sponsored by SRCCON - OpenNews)

    Speaker: Alan Palazzolo of WNYC - New York Public Radio

    Regardless of your views on the new administration, the campaign and election made it easy to feel like the work we do isn't important or impactful. I don't have answers, but maybe others do, and some constructive emoting might provide some catharsis either way.

    City Terrace 12

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Data cleaning in SQL

    Speaker: Madi Alexander of Bloomberg Government

    Spend enough time around databases and inevitably you’ll come across one that has an obnoxious number of variations on city names: New York City. New York. NYC. NY. And yes, even NY City. If you’re not sure how to handle that, this session is for you. Come to “Data cleaning in SQL” if you’ve had an introduction to SQL but want to move past the basics of “WHERE” and “ORDER BY.” We’ll cover how to deal with multiple spellings and misspellings, strange date formats, category codes, and a few other tricks and tips for using SQL to clean data.

    City Terrace 10

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    Drones for mapping

    Speaker: Matt Waite of University of Nebraska - Lincoln

    You've seen breathtaking video from drones, but the same platform can be used for mapping small areas at very high resolutions. The software couldn't be easier to make high resolution georeferenced aerial photos for data journalism. In this demo, you'll see the hardware, software and techniques used to do drone mapping.

    River Terrace 2

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Intro to database manager MySQL II

    Speaker: Elizabeth Lucas of Kaiser Health News

    We'll pick up from 'Intro to database manager MySQL I' and continue to cover SQL, introduce joining tables, and talk about some of the useful functions and other features unique to MySQL that make it a powerful and useful tool for reporting.

    This session is good for: Anyone with basic spreadsheet or database skills; we suggest you take the first part of this class: Intro to database manager MySQL I.

    City Terrace 11

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Mining data from the social web (hands-on)

    Speakers: Cathy Deng of independent journalist; Lam Thuy Vo of BuzzFeed News

    From President Donald Trump’s Twitter account to fake news — social media platforms have become a major source for news. 

    This hands-on session will give journalists the ability to harvest information from the social web in structured and automated ways. Participants will learn how to collect information from Facebook pages and Twitter accounts via scraping and APIs and turn them into spreadsheets. 

    To get the most out of this session: Attendees should have a basic grasp of programming concepts but do not need to be proficient in coding. Attendees should have their own Twitter and Facebook accounts and create app IDs for API access in advance of the session.

    City Terrace 5

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Public finance and the EMMA website

    Speaker: Leah Szarek of Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board

    For reporters covering state or local government, the Electronic Municipal Market Access (EMMA®) website provides free access to detailed information about the financial health of states, cities and counties, as well as many hospitals, universities, stadiums and other ventures financed by public debt. Staff from the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board will demonstrate how to find data and information on EMMA, from public finance credit ratings to comprehensive annual financial reports. This interactive session will also highlight several EMMA tools and resources that can assist reporters with monitoring state and local finances and identify potential stories.

    City Terrace 7

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Stats: Linear regression

    Speaker: Jeff Kelly Lowenstein of Grand Valley State University

    Go beyond counting and sorting. Learn how (and when) to measure relationships, level playing fields and make predictions.

    City Terrace 6

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    The art and science of the data story comment request

    Speakers: Rob Barry of The Wall Street Journal; Cezary Podkul of The Wall Street Journal; Sarah Ryley of The Trace

    So you’ve spent months analyzing data and collecting documents for an investigation and now it’s time to get a comment from the subject of your story. Except, they don’t like the story and don’t want to cooperate. How do you maximize your chances of getting a meaningful response? What does a well-crafted comment request look like? And what should you expect – and not expect – when you request comment for your story? Come hear answers to these and other questions as well as tips and tricks for managing your next big comment request.

    River Terrace 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Carwash: Data cleaning in Excel

    Speaker: Mike Wilkinson of Bridge Magazine

    City Terrace 10

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Command line tools for reporters (PC)

    Speaker: Chad Day of The Associated Press

    Repetitive tasks are the worst. I think we can all agree. If you’re tired of monotonous copying and pasting, if large files are harshing your mellow, or even if you just want to know more about that screen from War Games, then this class is for you. We’ll walk through some basics of the command line that can make your life easier and free up time for more important things. We’ll explore the powerful and versatile csvkit, fix messed up pdfs with some simple commands and get a taste of automating file downloads. No coding experience required but familiarity with SQL is a plus. Class is for PC users, but we’ll talk about Linux and Unix as well.

    City Terrace 11

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Conversations: How do I exist and work in a newsroom as a POC? (Sponsored by SRCCON - OpenNews)

    Speaker: Helga Salinas of The Seattle Times

    I'm interested if any journalists have brought up these issues in their own newsroom with their co-workers and/or management. It doesn't have to be along the lines of race, but also sexuality, immigration, gender, religion etc. The title refers to the question that I often asked myself after the election and subsequent current events.

    If it has been brought up in other newsrooms, did the discussion include newsroom ethic handbooks, defining conflicts of interest, and dealing with having a perceived advocacy/agenda as a news org while also fighting 'fake news.'

    City Terrace 12

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Design track: Use a charting tool (Sponsored by Society for News Design)

    Speakers: Grace Donnelly of Fortune Magazine; Stacy Jones of Fortune Magazine

    We’ll take a look at Datawrapper and discuss how to use it, how to customize it for your newsroom styles, and more.

    City Terrace 5

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Digging through the web

    Speaker: Gary Price of INFOdocket

    "Digging through the web" is being presented by Gary Price, founder of infoDOCKET.com and Caryn Baird, News Researcher at the Tampa Bay Times. In a fast-paced session, two veteran librarians will share a variety of research techniques and free resources. From backgrounding a person to retrieving an archived multimedia interview to one-click web scraping, this session will give you tools you can put to use immediately.

    River Terrace 1

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Going long on middleform

    Speakers: Darla Cameron of The Texas Tribune; Sarah Frostenson of POLITICO; Maureen Linke of The Associated Press; Stuart Thompson of The Wall Street Journal; Tom Cardoso of The Globe and Mail

    We've all heard of longform journalism — it's been the model for visual storytelling ever since “Snowfall” came out in 2012. Recently, our newsrooms have been producing more and more "middleform" — spending a week or two on visual and graphic stories instead of a month or more. We'll give some examples of recent middleform work, talk about the challenges of this kind of storytelling, and talk about where we see the format going in the next few years.

    **Moderated by Tom Cardoso, The Globe and Mail

    Conference Center A

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating bias and influence in criminal justice: Police and prosecutors

    Speakers: Cheryl W. Thompson of NPR; Sharad Goel of Stanford University; Josh Hinkle of KXAN/NBC Austin; Andrew Lehren of NBC News

    From wrongfully recording racial profiling data in traffic ticketing to disparities in adult diversion programs run by prosecutors, this session will examine how to mine criminal justice data, what to do when there seems to be no data and reporting it all out.  

    **Moderated by Cheryl W. Thompson, The Washington Post

    River Terrace 3

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Negotiating for the records

    Speakers: Maggie Mulvihill of Boston University; Jim Ross of James Hoyer Law Firm; John Bones of SKUP Norway

    Invest an hour into learning tips, tricks and techniques to effectively negotiate for municipal, state and federal government documents. A panel of veteran investigative reporters and a law firm investigator will offer tips to pry records from reluctant public officials. They’ll tell you how to draft a targeted request, cut your wait time and keep costs down. 

     

    Conference Center B

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    Personalized interactive journeys

    Speakers: Scott Blumenthal of The New York Times; Sandeep Junnarkar of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

    This session explores the developing art of creating mobile-friendly news interactives that deliver personalized experiences to users by guiding them through a series of choices. Scott Blumenthal, deputy editor of interactive news at the New York Times and Sandeep Junnarkar, director of interactive journalism at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, will explain the process of building these interactives that show audiences where they fit into the news – helping them understand complex issues or make informed decisions. The panelists will showcase work they've produced and explain how the pieces came together. This engaging form of storytelling can help the user forge connections to the experiences of others – giving them a deeper, more visceral understanding of the news’ impact on people’s lives.

    River Terrace 2

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Security tools for journalists - hands on (repeat session)

    Speaker: Mike Tigas of ProPublica

    You're traveling abroad to cover a story: What steps can you take to secure your data, your devices, and your sources before heading to the airport? What are the pros and cons of bringing a burner into the field? How should you send notes to your editor before returning home? This hands-on workshop is designed to address the digital security needs of journalists as they travel overseas. Participants can expect to demo a number of software solutions and security practices — with particular focus paid to mobile and desktop security and file encryption.

    City Terrace 7

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Stats: Logistic regression

    Speaker: Jennifer LaFleur of Investigative Reporting Workshop

    Linear regression helps you find relationships between two or more variables, but when an outcome has only two possibilities, you need a different tool. That, my friends, is where logistic regression comes in.

    This session will be taught in PSPP and will be most useful if: You took 'Stats: An introduction', or are comfortable with summary statistics and PSPP or SPSS. Familiarity with spreadsheets and database managers is recommended.

    City Terrace 6

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Visualization and analysis in Python (repeat session)

    Speaker: Chase Davis of Star Tribune

    So you're familiar with Python and some of its core concepts. How do you use that to crunch large amounts of data and records into stories and data visualizations quickly and easily? In this hands-on course, we'll show you our tips and tricks in using our favorite Python tools to do just that. You’ll walk out knowing how to go from analysis to publishable graphics in just a few minutes. The tools we'll be using: Seaborn (statistical data viz library), matplotlib (plotting library), pandas (data analysis tool), and Jupyter notebooks.

    City Terrace 8

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Outside Event

    See printed schedule for room information

    12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

  • Special Event

    City Terrace 12

    12:45 pm - 1:45 pm

  • Special Event

    Media lawyers brown bag

    Speakers: Jim Ross of James Hoyer Law Firm; Jennifer Mansfield of Holland & Knight; Maggie Mulvihill of Boston University

    During the media lawyers brown bag, between 12:45 and 1:45 p.m. on Saturday, March 4, bring your lunch and your questions for a personal discussion with a panel of media law and FOIA-savvy speakers. We'll provide drinks and dessert.

    River Terrace 3

    12:45 pm - 1:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Visualizing and understanding uncertainty (Sponsored by Society for News Design) **pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Alberto Cairo of University of Miami; Jen Christiansen of Scientific American; Mark Hansen of Columbia Journalism School

    Statistics is the science of uncertainty. It’s an invaluable tool for journalists trying to help readers and viewers make good choices with imperfect data. But though our models come with uncertainty, we are sometimes bad at helping readers understand the uncertainty that’s built into our work. Science is not far ahead of us -- look at the uncertainty cone in a hurricane, which lay readers often mistake for hurricane size. Look at how readers misinterpreted election predictions, even when they came with confidence intervals or likelihood measurements. How can we explain uncertainty better so that readers understand it? This is designed to be a hands-on collaborative workshop in which science communicators and visual journalists discuss the state of the art in visualizing uncertainty, then come up with some new directions via sketching and prototyping.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Computers will not be provided for this workshop so please bring your laptop.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    City Terrace 7

    2:15 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Demo

    30/60: Thirty of the best free data storytelling tools in sixty mins

    Speakers: Victor Hernandez of independent journalist; Mike Reilley of Society of Professional Journalists

    Settle in and buckle up! News innovators-in-residence Mike Reilley a trainer with the SPJ/Google News Lab program and Victor Hernandez from Banjo crank up the gravity-defying mind-bending roller coaster of new digital tools -- 30 of the latest and greatest (and free) for your data reporting toolkits. Featuring hands-on training focused on the newest available data visualization methods, mapping tools, mobile newsgathering apps and more -- this adventure promises all of the excitement of your favorite thrill ride, sans the motion sickness.

     

    River Terrace 2

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced Django for data analysis

    Speaker: Adam Playford of Tampa Bay Times

    You might be familiar with using Django to build front-facing web apps, but it can be equally useful as a tool for reporting on and exploring complicated datasets. In this session we'll show you when Django can be most helpful and walk you through modeling and loading data from a CSV, querying and annotating the data, and writing views to help bolster your analysis and speed up your reporting.
     
    This session will be most helpful if: You've made it through the Django tutorial and/or built your first news app. Familiarity with SQL will help.

    City Terrace 8

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Building your first Leaflet.js map

    Speaker: Chris Essig of The Texas Tribune

    Maps! Who doesn't love wonderful, colorful maps? In this course we will be building a map with Leaflet.js., a very popular Javascript mapping library. The map will display both markers and shapes. The shapes will be used to create a basic choropleth map.

     

    City Terrace 5

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Data can only dance with its music: Understanding the ecology of public data

    Speakers: Carli Brosseau of The News & Observer; Tom Johnson of Institute for Analytic Journalism; Andrew Lehren of NBC News

    Traditionally, journalists have sought government documents. Today we seek digital data. But that data always exists in a metadata ecosystem of variable definitions. The metadata contributes to seeing patterns, trends and significance in the data analysis. So do we submit FOIA requests for the data or the metadata or both in the same request? Each approach can have varying degrees of success. This session will consist of short presentations, followed by an audience discussion of how to develop best practice FOIA request strategies.

    Conference Center B

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Getting started with Access without using SQL

    Speaker: Mc Nelly Torres of independent journalist

    This session is designed to teach you how to use Access without Structure Query Language, also known as SQL. Learn how to download data onto Access and query the data using design view or the grid, instead of SQL. You’ll learn how to select specific fields on the data, sort and filter.

    City Terrace 6

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Special Event

    Inaugural hack swap

    Speakers: Jeremy Bowers of The New York Times; Andrew Chavez of The Dallas Morning News; Jon McClure of POLITICO

    City Terrace 12

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Investigating bias and influence in criminal justice: Judges and beyond

    Speakers: Cheryl Phillips of Stanford University; Michael Braga of GateHouse Media; Robert Gebeloff of The New York Times; Barnaby Skinner of Tages-Anzeiger & SonntagsZeitung

    Learn how you can track disparities in criminal justice systems and report inequities, from judges that dole out asylum requests based on political affiliation to figuring out how to sift through millions of sentencing records or prison data to find disparate treatment and report out the story. 

    **Moderated by Cheryl Phillips, Stanford University

    River Terrace 3

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Using R as a GIS for spatial analysis and visualization (intermediate)

    Speaker: Andrew Tran of The Washington Post

    In this session, we'll be using R for spatial analysis and creating publication-worthy map graphics. Learn how to go beyond the dots to dig deeper and tell better stories with location data in bulk. 

    City Terrace 9

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    What product can do for journalism

    Speakers: Marie Gilot of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism; Celeste LeCompte of ProPublica; Stacy-Marie Ishmael of Stanford University, JSK Journalism Fellowships

    Media companies, both startups, and legacy organizations are investing in news products, such as mobile apps, email newsletters, SMS bots, etc. The product approach, which demands design, data, technology, journalism, and management skills, is critical to the future of media and can lead to new revenue streams and rewarding new career paths.

     

    Conference Center A

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Panel

    Working with academics

    Speakers: Matt Dempsey of Houston Chronicle; Karisa King of Las Vegas Review-Journal; Al Shaw of ProPublica

    Academics can help you make almost impossible projects possible. But how do you know when a project would be a good fit for academic collaboration? What's the challenges behind it? And how do you thread the needle between the demands of journalism and the restrictions of academia? Hear from three journalists with experience in these types of projects. Find out how to take your complicated idea and turn it into reality without tearing your hair out.

    River Terrace 1

    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

  • Hands-on

    Command line for reporters (Unix)

    Speaker: AJ Vicens of Mother Jones

    Too often in data journalism we forget about the basics. And it doesn’t get as basic as the command line. 

    Even knowing a little will make your job easier. We’ll run through some simple commands, and dive into working with spreadsheets, I’ll show you some handy tools I frequently use at work.

    This session is good for: People unfamiliar with the command line, and those who want to get some practical, hands-on practice with the Mac-based terminal.

    City Terrace 5

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Counting & summing with Access without using SQL

    Speaker: Helena Bengtsson of Sveriges Television

    You know how to use Excel, but what do you do when you have a huge database with dozens of columns full of data? Access lets you isolate those different columns and efficiently sort through the stuff you don’t need, letting you quickly analyze national databases to figure out which convenience store sold the most winning Powerball tickets, which county has the highest number of infant deaths within a certain time frame, or which state has the most historical wooden bridges more than 100 years old that, say, go over railroad tracks.

    This class is for anyone trying to find the golden nugget hiding in the data. No programming language or SQL experience necessary, but a healthy understanding of Excel is helpful.

    City Terrace 6

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Drugs, drugs, drugs

    Speakers: Sydney Lupkin of Kaiser Health News; Mike Stucka of The Palm Beach Post

    Learn about the data analysis that revealed possible game-playing by pharmaceutical companies to help keep drug prices high for patients with rare diseases. We will also discuss where to find other drug-related databases.

    Hear about the technical challenges, logistical hurdles and emotional struggles of telling the life stories of all 216 people who died in a county in one year from heroin-related overdoses. Besides putting a face on the drug crisis, we also put a price tag: $4.1 million a day in Florida alone.

    Conference Center A

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Earth, wind and fire: Covering disasters from a data perspective

    Speakers: Eric Sagara of Big Local News; Stephen Stirling of NJ Advance Media; Chris Vaillancourt of Esri

    When disaster strikes, it can turn a newsroom into chaos. Tight deadlines, power loss and harried editors all complicate the already rough waters of navigating a newsroom as a data journalist. This panel will prepare you to weather the storm.  Panelists will discuss what you need, where to get it and how to rise above the inevitable firestorm that besets a newsroom when the Earth turns the news cycle upside-down. We'll also talk about new ways of presenting those stories through satellite imagery and weather data.

    River Terrace 3

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Google Fusion Tables (beginner)

    Speaker: Tommy Kaas of Kaas & Mulvad

    Welcome to Google Fusion Tables. In this hands-on introduction to the free online tool you'll learn how to import and combine data, do simple analysis and easily turn that into an online map.

    This session will be most useful if: You've ever used a spreadsheet. You need to have a Google account.

     

    City Terrace 8

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Javascript charts and maps, straight from R (intermediate)

    Speaker: Peter Aldhous of BuzzFeed News

    In this session, we'll be using htmlwidgets to create simple JavaScript charts and maps, straight from your R data analysis pipeline and with no need to write JavaScript

    City Terrace 9

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Special Event

    Localize that investigation: Using AP data to do your own stories

    Speakers: Troy Thibodeaux of The Associated Press; Meghan Hoyer of The Associated Press; Ian Greenleigh of data.world

    Do you like the idea of having someone else do the grunt work on data analysis projects for you? Wish there was a way of knowing when AP is planning a national data-driven story so you could have a related local story ready to go? Then come to this NICAR Commons session and learn more about AP’s data distribution efforts. We want to hear how we can make our data work for you.  If your organization is an AP member, you’ll also have a chance to sign up for our pilot project sharing data via data.world. A data.world representative will give a walk-through of their data-sharing platform.

    City Terrace 12

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Protecting endangered data in the Trump era and beyond

    Speakers: Margaret Janz of University of Pennsylvania; Yogin Kothari of Union of Concerned Scientists; Nancy Watzman of Internet Archive; David Herzog of IRE and NICAR

    Access to government data has always hinged on the priorities and values of different administrations. We’ll talk to attendees about how they can protect endangered data in the Trump era and beyond. Panelists will share lessons learned and best practices from their own experiences shielding data.

    **Moderated by David Herzog, IRE/NICAR

    Conference Center B

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Panel

    Quick-turn data stories

    Speakers: Greta Kaul of MinnPost; Dave Sheingold of independent journalist; Patrick Cain of Global News; Mark Walker of The New York Times

    Sometimes you get the luxury of time to think about a data-based story – and sometimes you don’t. Four reporters talk about what they learned from turning a data story around on a tight deadline, how best to prepare for quick turnarounds, and what they’d do differently.

    River Terrace 1

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Demo

    Tools to convert lots of PDFs at once

    Speakers: Miguel Barbosa of CitizenAudit; Todd Wallack of The Boston Globe

    This class will cover basic approaches for getting text out of PDF documents using powerful and freely available tools. Participants will be introduced to basic concepts and walked-through tackling common challenges encountered with tricky PDF documents.

    This class is best for: People who are unfamiliar with the PDF to text tools or would like to learn how optical character recognition (OCR) tools can be used for extracting difficult text from images embedded in PDF documents.

    River Terrace 2

    3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Advanced analysis in SQL (repeat session)

    Speaker: Jacob Fenton of independent journalist

    If you feel comfortable with the Structured Query Language basics that IRE teaches in its boot camps -- SELECT, FROM, WHERE, GROUP BY -- but are ready to see what else SQL can do, this session is for you. We will cover more advanced ways of manipulating and questioning data, such as UPDATE queries, joins, writing sub-queries, and other neat tricks.  We will use PostgreSQL.

    City Terrace 9

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Animated video for storytelling

    Speaker: Kavya Sukumar of Hearken

    Short animated videos are a great way to  tell complex stories in an easily shareable form that works on most devices and social media platforms. In this session, learn to create and publish your own animated video from scratch with Adobe After Effects.

    This session is good for beginners who are new to making videos as well as for people with some experience in video production looking to add animation to your skill set. This workshop also introduces the basics of Adobe Expressions, a javascript like language, to control animation.

    City Terrace 5

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    Economic development incentives: Old issues, hot new data

    Speakers: Greg LeRoy of Good Jobs First; Janelle O'Dea of St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    States and cities spend tens of billions of dollars on “corporate welfare,” or economic development tax breaks for all kinds of projects. Persistent shoe-leather reporting has long proven effective in exposing problems with many deals. Now a new accounting rule, Governmental Accounting Standards Board Statement No. 77 on Tax Abatement Disclosures, is about to generate first-ever spending data from more than 50,000 local and state bodies of government, a new investigative gold mine!

    Conference Center B

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Special Event

    Ethical dilemmas in data

    Speakers: MaryJo Webster of Star Tribune; Tom McGinty of The Wall Street Journal

    Approaching our work in an ethical and transparent manner is more important than ever before. We’ll point out some of the potential pitfalls that particularly apply to data journalism, and show you ways to avoid them.

     

    City Terrace 12

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Demo

    Internet Archive: Resources, tools, and tricks

    Speaker: Nancy Watzman of Internet Archive

    Have you ever wondered how to get the Wayback Machine to crawl what you want it to crawl? Are you looking for that thing you know President Donald Trump said, but you don’t remember when, where, or to whom? Would you like to know how often a particular video clip was repeated by Fox News or MSNBC? We’ll do a deep dive into the byways of the Internet Archive and explore how we can help bolster your reporting. We’ll also preview our plans to mine more rich metadata from our 30 petabytes of TV news shows, web pages, books and more.

    River Terrace 2

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Joining in Access without using SQL

    Speaker: Helena Bengtsson of Sveriges Television

    Learn how to join tables and match information from one file to another.

    If you feel at home with Excel, but want to take the next step with larger files and joining data, this is the session for you. Access is the easy gateway drug to the harder stuff, like SQL and R - and here you'll learn how to join and count without a single line of code."

    City Terrace 6

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    Putting your town under a microscope--and keeping it there

    Speakers: Kate Howard of Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting; Matt Kiefer of The Chicago Reporter; Andrew Mollica of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    Ever wonder how other journalists manage investigations and the inevitable series of follow-ups that come with them? This panel will discuss practical and technical tips for zooming in to the smallest levels of your beat and monitor every budget line item, census tract or lawsuit you need to report the story -- and how to follow the story to the end.

     

    River Terrace 3

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Regular expressions

    Speaker: Justin Myers of The Associated Press

    Regular expressions are a powerful tool when working with data, especially when dealing with values that are formatted inconsistently. They're supported by a variety of text editors, databases and programming languages, but they can be pretty daunting if you've never dealt with them before. Learn about the basics of regular expressions and how they can help with your next batch of dirty data.

    City Terrace 8

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    Separating fact from fiction: Information verification

    Speakers: Steve Myers of Nieman Fellow; Gary Price of INFOdocket

    Odds are, your boss has asked you to comb through social media during breaking news to find photos and witness accounts. Odds are, no one has taught you how to assess whether those images are authentic. We will. 

     

    Conference Center A

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Panel

    Using data to cover immigration

    Speakers: Nassos Stylianou of BBC News; Linnea Heppling of SVT (Swedish Television); Andrew Becker of KUER Public Radio

    River Terrace 1

    4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

  • Hands-on

    Just enough Django: Distributed data entry in the newsroom (beginner/intermediate) *pre-registered attendees only

    Speakers: Dana Amihere of KPCC - 89.3; Ben Welsh of Los Angeles Times

    Dana Amihere, Ken Schwencke and Ben Welsh present a step-by-step guide to creating a simple web application that empowers you to enlist reporters in data entry and refinement. The 3-hour, hands-on tutorial will teach you how to take advantage of the Django Web framework's powerful administration panel, without bothering with all the other web developer crap. You will learn how to design database tables, load in data and quickly create a system for others to improve its content.

    Preregistration is required and seating is limited. Laptops will be provided for the training.

    Workshop prerequisites: If you have a good attitude and know how to take a few code crashes in stride, you are qualified for this class.

    NOTE: Registration is required for this session. Click here to sign up.

    City Terrace 4

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    Command line graphics

    Speaker: Jon Keegan of Tow Center - Columbia University

    Some of the most powerful tools for creating visuals and working with images lie hidden in your terminal. We'll do an overview of some of these amazing (FREE!) tools – such as ImageMagick and ffmpeg – and see some real-world techniques for working with large collections of images, and how I use these tools in my projects. Some of the things we'll cover: make a timelapse video from sequential images, extract and save metadata embedded in photos, create image quilts, and build animated GIFs from videos.

     

    River Terrace 2

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    Conference sales (Sunday)

    Stop by the NICAR Conference sales table and browse our merchandise, including the IRE bookstore's most popular titles and shirts with the winning design from the NICAR T-shirt contest. 

    3rd floor - Skybridge

    9:00 am - 10:30 am

  • Hands-on

    Finding connections in campaign finance data with graph databases

    Speakers: Meredith Broussard of New York University; William Lyon of Neo4j

    Graph databases are optimized for working with complex and connected data. Campaign finance data is a great example of a complex dataset where the connections in the data are often as important as the discrete data points, making it a great use case for a graph database.

    In this hands-on workshop we will cover how to model, import, and query campaign finance data using the Neo4j graph database. We will focus on learning the property graph data model and how to use Cypher, the query language for graphs, to write queries that can help find stories in the data. 

    This session is geared toward those with some basic familiarity with databases and data analysis, but will start at an introductory level for those new to graph databases.

    City Terrace 5

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Getting data into Excel

    Speaker: Emmanuel Martinez of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

    Data doesn’t always come in nicely formatted spreadsheets. For some file formats, you can’t analyze the data until you get it into a spreadsheet. In this session, we will import everything from text files to tables on a webpage into Excel. We will cover the importance of data types, delimiters and fixed-width columns to make the import process as smooth as possible.

    City Terrace 9

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Lighter side of data journalism?

    Speakers: Jenny Ye of WNYC - New York Public Radio; Jeffrey Hargarten of Star Tribune

    Pokemon Go analysis, Halloween Candy Index, March Madness Nailbiter Bot…there is room for playful data journalism in the newsroom. Join us as we walk through lighthearted projects - from data acquisition to presentation. Bring your ideas and we can workshop them as well.

    River Terrace 3

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Special Event

    OpenElections hackathon

    Speakers: Derek Willis of ProPublica; Serdar Tumgoren of Stanford University

    We’re working on turning election results into data, and you can join us. Whether you have scraping skills, can parse PDFs or help find the official sources of election results in a state, you can help OpenElections make more election results data available to journalists and researchers. We’ll have prizes for contributors, too!

    City Terrace 12

    9:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Stats: Linear regression (repeat session)

    Speaker: Jeff Kelly Lowenstein of Grand Valley State University

    Go beyond counting and sorting. Learn how (and when) to measure relationships, level playing fields and make predictions.

    City Terrace 8

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    Twitter tricks and analytics

    Speaker: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR

    Dive deeper with Twitter through advanced searches, including tweets near a specific location. Explore third-party apps to mine Twitter for sources and visuals. Learn the basics of analytics to determine which tweets connect with your audience and which ones fall flat.

    City Terrace 7

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Panel

    Year in CAR (repeat session)

    Speakers: Lauren Grandestaff of IRE and NICAR; Kaitlin Washburn of The Sun-Gazette

    What were the big stories of the year? What were the most creative uses of data analysis? See what your colleagues have been up to and pick up some story ideas at the same time. This session is good for: Anyone.

    River Terrace 1

    9:00 am - 10:00 am

  • Hands-on

    ArcGIS Online and the power of Story Maps

    Speakers: Cooper Thomas of Esri; Chris Vaillancourt of Esri

    City Terrace 9

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Career roundtable

    Speakers: Clark Fouraker of WCBS-New York; Jill Riepenhoff of InvestigateTV; Steven Rich of The Washington Post; Megan Luther of InvestigateTV; Mc Nelly Torres of independent journalist

    Looking for advice on how to take the next step in your career? Get practical tips from panelists who will talk about their own experiences and discuss what employers are looking for.

    **Moderated by Megan Luther, IRE/NICAR

    River Terrace 3

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Data analysis in Javascript and Node.js

    Speaker: Daniel Lathrop of University of Iowa

    City Terrace 5

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Panel

    Let's get creepy: Backgrounding tips from a journalist and librarian

    Speakers: Sarah Hutchins of IRE and NICAR; Lauren Grandestaff of IRE and NICAR

    Backgrounding sources can be a tedious and time-consuming process. But there's nothing worse that being caught off-guard in the moments before publication – or, even worse, after publication. We'll help you develop a list of go-to online tools and resources to speed up the process, and run through a couple scenarios to show you how they work in practice.

    River Terrace 1

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Demo

    Programming best practices

    Speaker: Jeff Larson of The Markup

    We've all created projects that grew bugs and corner cases like they were going out of style. I've certainly created many projects that turned into unruly messes of dependency hell, and hard to follow logic. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this class we'll cover hard earned lessons in structuring code, handling and processing data, and general organization best practices, that will help you find the best story from your data, while saving your sanity.

    River Terrace 2

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    Stats: Logistic regression (repeat session)

    Speaker: John Perry of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Linear regression helps you find relationships between two or more variables, but when an outcome has only two possibilities, you need a different tool. That, my friends, is where logistic regression comes in.

    This session will be taught in PSPP and will be most useful if: You took 'Stats: An introduction', or are comfortable with summary statistics and PSPP or SPSS. Familiarity with spreadsheets and database managers is recommended.

    City Terrace 8

    10:15 am - 11:15 am

  • Hands-on

    D3: How to make reusable charts for different platforms

    Speaker: Daniele Palumbo of BBC News

    We'll learn how to start coding D3 in a simple way, setting our code so that we can power charts ready to be used on mobile, desktop, social media and video. The session will focus also on how to set Excel files to include special features in a D3 chart, examples and useful GitHub libraries to use.

    This class is good for: basic and intermediate learners of D3, HTML and CSS.

    City Terrace 5

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Getting data into Access

    Speaker: Tracy Greer of KJZZ Phoenix

    This course will review the basics of using Microsoft Access. Understanding when Access is the right database software to use, how to enter and import data, and what to look for once you’re staring at a database interface.

    City Terrace 9

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Hands-on

    Google Fusion Tables (advanced)

    Speaker: Daniel Lathrop of University of Iowa

    City Terrace 8

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Demo

    Introducing Flourish: A powerful new platform for templating visuals and stories

    Speaker: Duncan Clark of Kiln

    Flourish is a new platform for data visualization and storytelling. It enables journalists to easily produce and publish high-end graphics, maps, explainers, steppers and other outputs from flexible templates. An ever-growing library of open-source templates is available, but developers can also make their own public or private templates using the Flourish SDK and standard technologies such as D3, SVG and WebGL. Flourish was created by multi-award-winning visualization studio Kiln; beta partners include the BBC, Guardian and FT. This event gives an overview of the platform and provides NICAR attendees with exclusive early access to the website and SDK.

    River Terrace 2

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Outwit, outplay, outlast: How to pull off a student investigation

    Speakers: Briana Erickson of Las Vegas Review-Journal; Sara Gregory of The Virginian-Pilot; Samantha Sunne of independent journalist; Sarah Hutchins of IRE and NICAR

    Think you don't have the time or resources to pull off a data-driven or investigative story as a student? We'll prove you wrong. We'll be sharing our favorite tips, techniques and tools for student journalists. Learn how to outwit campus administrators, outplay FOIA exemptions and outlast sources who expect you to go away quietly after graduation.

    **Moderated by Sarah Hutchins, IRE/NICAR

    River Terrace 3

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm

  • Panel

    Social media sleuthing

    Speaker: Doug Haddix of IRE and NICAR

    Discover the tactics and tricks of advanced searches in Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram. Tap the power of geolocation to find public social media posts by location, including near a specific address anywhere in the world. Learn how to monitor social platforms efficiently.

    River Terrace 1

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm