Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • VPR: Watch Your Speed

    Law enforcement in Vermont issued more than 24,000 tickets worth upwards of $4 million in fines to drivers in 2017. A quarter were issued in three small towns. This investigation revealed how one county sheriff has profited from his traffic contracts with two of the towns. It also showed how issuing traffic tickets allowed another town to maintain an unusually low tax rate.
  • VICE News with The Investigative Fund: A Slaughter in Silence

    In a series of reports for VICE News, in partnership with The Investigative Fund, Nick Turse investigated a startling campaign of violence that swept through Djugu territory in the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Ituri province in late 2017 and early 2018.
  • VicAd: Port Politics

    When disgraced former Congressman Blake Farenthold resurfaced as the Calhoun Port Authority's first full-time lobbyist at an annual salary of $160,000, the public was outraged. Farenthold later said in a deposition that he and the port board thought they could weather this initial storm and continue to do business as they always had outside the public view. All other state and national media quickly moved on from the story, but the Victoria Advocate kept digging and found that the public had a lot more to be outraged about.
  • USA TODAY/BOSTON GLOBE: VA nursing home quality revealed

    A rolling, joint investigation of Department of Veterans Affairs nursing home quality that pressured the agency to release internal ratings and data the agency had kept secret for years, depriving veterans and their families of potentially crucial health care information.
  • Unlicensed, Unpunished

    A single tip led the investigative team at Denver7 to uncover unlicensed, untrained and often unpunished health care workers diagnosing and treating vulnerable, sick and disadvantaged Coloradans. The team’s work led to criminal investigations, forced Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to intervene in the matter directly, and prompted state regulators to rewrite and reprioritize their policies. It represents a textbook case of journalists holding the powerful accountable by identifying fundamental problems in the institutions designed to keep consumers safe. Hickenlooper credited Denver7 for "actually making the community safer."
  • University of Idaho botches sexual assault case

    A former University of Idaho athlete posted an account online of ways the athletic department mishandled her accusation of sexual assault against a football player. We conducted interviews and acquired extensive documentation to show what went wrong -- and that the university had known almost immediately about its mistakes but never told her. The athletic direction was placed on leave and eventually fired after an independent investigation commissioned by the university.
  • Unintended Consequences: Sex Offenders in Motels & Hotels

    In a six-month investigation, NBC5 Investigates found 667 sex offenders living at 490 motels and hotels throughout Illinois and nine surrounding states. Though many check in to these motels for a few weeks or months at a time, we found that approximately half of these offenders stay there for at least six months or more – and sometimes for years. With few exceptions in just a handful of towns across the country, it is perfectly legal for any registered sex offender to take up residence at a hotel or motel. Often these offenders have few other places where they can legally reside – because they can’t live near parks or schools, which dot most residential areas. There’s also somewhat of a trend away from funding for halfway houses and mental health re-entry facilities, where these offenders might otherwise go.
  • Uncover: Escaping NXIVM - CBC

    NXIVM calls itself a humanitarian community. Experts call it a cult. Uncover: Escaping NXIVM is an investigative podcast series about the group, its leader Keith Raniere and one woman's journey to get out and take the group down.
  • CBC: Unassisted Death

    In a powerful series of stories, CBC Edmonton revealed the devastating human cost of the medical-assistance-in-dying (MAID) policy of Alberta’s massive Catholic health provider, Covenant Health. By default, Covenant's policy prohibited patients from even signing their MAID request forms, or undergoing eligibility assessments by provincial medical staff, on its publicly funded property. Covenant Health also explicitly prohibits assisted deaths from taking place in its facilities.
  • TX Observer: Prison by Any Other Name

    Since the 1990s, Texas has run a controversial, constitutionally dubious “civil commitment” program that keeps hundreds of sex offenders in intensive monitoring and treatment long after they’ve finished their prison sentences. In 2015, after the agency running the program nearly imploded amid mismanagement, Texas lawmakers essentially turned civil commitment over to a scandal-ridden private prison contractor eager to gobble up contracts at the intersection of incarceration and therapy. The result: non-existent treatment, shoddy medical care, and a new taxpayer-funded, privately operated lockup in middle-of-nowhere Texas, where men under civil commitment are now confined indefinitely. Since the facility opened, only five men have been released — four of them to medical facilities where they later died.