Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • Corruption in the Cumberland

    For a year, the News4 I-Team investigated political corruption in the Upper Cumberland area of Middle Tennessee. The investigation has resulted in two criminal investigations into mayors, the termination of the head of a government agency, a state investigation, a state audit, a federal lawsuit and the payback of taxpayer dollars.
  • IMPOSTORS

    Impostors is a two-hour documentary series taking viewers inside the underground world of unlicensed healthcare in Arizona. The six-part series exposes how a deeply incompetent, impotent, and indifferent regulatory system let’s an unthinkable number of medical impostors continue to practice.
  • Oil Empire

    As Texas' oil production has boomed and the Craddick family's oil wealth has increased, so has their political clout. When Christi Craddick assumed elected office as that industry's top regulator in 2013, it ensured the Craddick name would be one of the most powerful and widely-renowned in the state's history. KXAN discovered, since the start of 2014, Craddick voted at least 320 times on agenda items brought by companies that pay her and her family royalties or dividends, according to her personal financial disclosures. We also found she cast more than 100 votes on enforcement actions against those companies.
  • Indian Hills Community College

    The Indian Hills Community College baseball team in Iowa ousted two of its coaches — one of them a hall of fame coach — in May. After a more than four-month investigation, the Daily Iowegian found the coaches were removed after an internal investigation that coaches forced players to work for security companies at NFL and Big 10 games in Minneapolis and Iowa City, all while assigning fake names to foreign-born students so they could work around federal immigration law. The money went to the baseball program, not the players.
  • Aaron Hernandez and Football Inc.

    Patriots star tight end Aaron Hernandez dazzled crowds with his spectacular athleticism, only to be implicated in one murder, then two others. He took his own life at age 27. Through documents and audio recordings, some never before made public, and interviews with key people who have never before spoken, the Globe’s Spotlight Team has compiled the story of a profoundly troubled young man and the ugly underside of America’s most popular sport. Its reporters produced a six-part print series and its first-ever multi-episode podcast where you can hear the voices – including that of Aaron Hernandez – that will bring the story alive.
  • Insult to Injury

    As Tesla races to revolutionize the automobile industry and build a more sustainable future, it has left its factory workers in the past, still painfully vulnerable to the dangers of manufacturing. Our reporting shows that Tesla prioritized speed over safety, ignored its own safety experts and denied proper medical care to injured workers. And in order to make its safety record look better than it really is, Tesla has kept injuries off the books. Our radio segments take listeners into the factory and behind the scenes, as whistleblowers tell their secrets and workers show the toll on their lives.
  • Kept Out

    Kept Out provided a sweeping indictment of access to credit, showing that millions of Americans are being denied a chance at the American dream simply because of the color of their skin. Because, homeownership is most families' primary source of wealth, the average white family is now worth 15 times as much as the typical African American one. Our radio documentary tells this story through one African-American woman's quest to buy a home in Philadelphia.
  • Hurricane Maria’s dead

    On September 20, 2017 Puerto Rico was devastated by the strongest hurricane that has hit the island in the last century. In the weeks after the storm, the government insisted there were only a few dozen deaths, but reporting on the ground by the Center for Investigative Journalism suggested there were hundreds. Officials also refused to provide overall mortality statistics that could help measure the impact of the storm. Given the lack of a reliable official death toll, we put together our own database with information collected from family members through an online survey, reporting, and tips. We verified those deaths by matching the victims’ names with government death records CPI eventually obtained through a lawsuit, and through nearly 300 phone interviews with victims’ relatives. We analyzed that material, as well as historic demographic data, to detect changes in mortality trends after the storm.
  • Minnesota's Graduation Gap

    MPR News set out to delve into an underreported fact -- that Minnesota’s high school graduation rates for students of color rank among the very worst in the nation -- and ended up making a profound discovery: Minnesota devotes less to non-classroom student support than any state. The category includes guidance counselors, social workers, nurses and mental health counselors, attendance staff and other positions that education experts says are key to keeping students at risk of dropping out of school on the path to graduations. The link between support spending and graduation rates appears to be stronger than other oft-mentioned factors to explain low rates for students of color. http://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/06/01/grad-gap-highlights