Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • Consumer Fraud Involving Various Agricultural Products and Crops

    This series focuses on consumer fraud involving various agricultural products and crops. As American consumers seek more quality and health claims about products they buy, they're also demanding greater transparency from the companies that make these goods. But there's still plenty of secrecy in the supply chains from the farms that produce raw materials to the finished products that people purchase at stores.
  • Shoot to Kill

    With no dependable, uniform data on gun violence, it’s impossible to get even a simple tally of the number of shootings in the United States. So Baltimore Sun reporter George and Marquette University students, as part of the O’Brien Fellowship in Public Service Journalism, spent months trying to understand how many people are shot and how often they survive. What they found is that the odds of survival for gunshot victims were getting worse in at least 10 of the nation’s largest cities, including Baltimore, New York and Chicago.
  • Shocking Force

    This first-ever data analysis of police use of Tasers revealed that departments across Maryland predominantly used the devices against suspects who, by their own assessment, posed no immediate threat, and showed that officers didn’t follow widely accepted safety recommendations, shocking people for longer than what’s recommended and firing at the chest despite warnings it could cause cardiac arrest.
  • A Marine’s Convictions

    A Marine fights to prove he’s innocent of sexual misconduct. Then a lost cellphone is found.
  • Luxuries on public dime

    Based on public financial records obtained through an FOI request, a Belleville News-Democrat investigation found that more than $230,000 was spent on a taxpayer-supported American Express card over four years used by East St. Louis Township Supervisor Oliver Hamilton. He used the card to buy construction materials, take Las Vegas trips, purchase gas for his private vehicle, and buy dinners and gifts for political friends. Hamilton pleaded guilty to federal charges for misusing public funds.
  • Bled Dry

    When local hospitals shut their doors, communities usually blame poor economics or heavy regulation. But The Dallas Morning News found another reason for closures: Businessmen who bought ailing hospitals and siphoned off their cash, often leaving them vacant hulks in devastated towns. What may seem at first to be an unlikely scenario has played out not just in Texas, but across the country. One owner left a trail of 13 wrecked hospitals in seven states. In Nevada, a doctor who put down $10,000 to take over the only hospital between Reno and Las Vegas pulled out at least $8 million before the cash-starved medical center shut down. Federal regulators and most states don’t vet people who take over hospitals, The News discovered, and there is little financial oversight. Even when patient care suffers at these stripped facilities, regulators seldom hold those who profited accountable.
  • Accounting for Terror

    As terrorism shook the Western world in 2016, The Wall Street Journal investigated an area largely unexamined in the public furor over repeated attacks: the money trail. In a yearlong series, “Accounting for Terror,” a team of Journal reporters followed the money—in one case, literally. The stories illuminated an invisible foundation of ISIS and other terrorist groups: the economic engines that support their reign of murder and violence. The Journal obtained secret ISIS documents describing the terror group’s construction of a multinational oil operation obsessed with maximizing profits. It showed how some suspects in the Paris and Brussels terrorist attacks collected welfare benefits until just before they acted. And it detailed how an iconic American food producer of Butterball turkeys has done millions of dollars of business in Africa with a company blacklisted by U.S. authorities for supporting terrorism.
  • Who Guards the Guardians

    This series was developed to give the public an insider's view into a taxpayer funded court system that can do irreparable harm after it is asked to help. It is the section of the court that deals with families bickering over what do to with an aging, ailing Mom or Dad. Judges in these courts have extraordinary powers to strip the elderly of their civil rights, push family members aside and appoint strangers to act as personal and financial guardians for the newly proclaimed “ward of the court.” In the process the guardians can – and do – ignore carefully prepared estate plans and wills, bypassing the expressed wishes of the elder. It is a growing nationwide problem which will only become more pervasive as the U.S. population continues to grow older. This series focuses on the especially secretive system in place in New Mexico.
  • Hidden Dangers on America's Roads

    “Hidden Dangers on America’s Roads” is a compilation of CBS News investigations revealing lax government regulation and the unwillingness of automakers to address potentially fatal issues in transportation safety. Those issues include vehicle defects, outdated federal automotive safety standards and policies surrounding the medical qualifications, or lack thereof, of commercial interstate drivers. These stories exposed weaknesses that inspired members of Congress to push for an upgrade of federal motor vehicle safety standards, forced the National Highway Traffic Safety administration to launch programs to identify potential changes to standards and led to a recall of more than a million vehicles worldwide.
  • Seismic Denial

    Despite growing scientific evidence, Texas won't admit that fracking wastewater is causing earthquakes. Why?