Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "2001" ...

  • The Daily News: The 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund

    During the course of reporting on the anniversary of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center, Daily News reporter Thomas Tracy spoke with an official on the record who said that the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund was running out of money. Tracy broke the news exclusively that the fund would not have enough money to help all survivors sickened at Ground Zero.
  • Hazard Above

    According to a year-long investigation by The Washington Post, hundreds of military drones have crashed in major accidents around the world since 2001 and civilian drones are posing a new threat to passenger air traffic in the United States. Drones have revolutionized warfare and are set to revolutionize civil aviation under a 2012 federal law that will allow them to fly freely in American skies. But The Post found that the U.S. military and the Federal Aviation Administration suppressed widespread patterns of safety problems with drones and tried to keep details of accidents and near mid-air collisions a secret. Drawing on more than 50,000 pages of accident investigation reports and other records obtained under FOIA, The Post uncovered more than 400 major military drone crashes worldwide, including 49 in the United States. Some drone models were particularly crash-prone: almost half of the Air Force’s iconic Predator fleet has been destroyed in accidents. The Post published details of 194 of the most serious accidents in an interactive online database, as well as crash-scene photographs, voice-recording transcripts and a video of a stricken Predator drone filming its own fiery breakup over Iraq. The Post also exposed a rash of dangerous encounters between civilian airplanes and drones flown in contravention of FAA rules intended to safeguard U.S. airspace, a problem that has worsened since the series was first published.
  • Donation Deception

    This KXAN investigation uncovered millions of dollars donated to Texas veterans charities mostly going in the pockets of fund-raisers. They poured financial reports those solicitors are required to submit to the Texas Secretary of State. Their investigation found professional fund-raisers have collected $130,399,567 for veteran organizations since 2001, the records show. But those fund-raisers kept 84% of the money donated. Meaning, most of the money people donate never reaches veterans needing help. They also went undercover to find VFW posts and bars using a potentially illegal method of fundraising in the form of computer video games where people can pay to play and win money, which the Texas Attorney General has ruled are illegal.
  • Broken Windows

    “Beyond Broken”: The number of summonses issued each year has soared since broken windows was implemented in the early 1990s — from 160,000 in 1993 to a peak of 648,638 in 2005 — making ticket writing for low-level offenses the single most frequent activity of NYPD officers, far surpassing felony and misdemeanor arrests combined. Roughly 81% of the 7.3 million people hit with summonses between 2001 and 2013 were black and Hispanic. And the top 15 precincts with the highest rate of summonses have a population that is 75% or more black and Hispanic. They spoke to nearly 170 people waiting in line at the city’s three summons courts. Although some admitted guilt, many said they felt targeted by officers looking to write tickets, as if their neighborhood were under “martial law.”
  • Stop and Seize: Cops and the Cash They Confiscate

    After Sept. 11, 2001, federal authorities asked local and state police to serve as their eyes and ears on America's highways. The departments of Justice and Homeland Security, along with state agencies, spent millions to train them in an aggressive technique known as highway interdiction. But it soon became something else: Dragnets that swept up the criminal and innocent alike in a search for money. The Washington Post series revealed one of the great unknown consequences of 9/11. Local and state police, working through a Justice program called Equitable Sharing, have made nearly 62,000 cash seizures totally $2.5 billion since 9/11, without warrants or criminal charges.
  • State Restrains Psychiatric Patients At High Rate

    Between 2001 and 2007, Connecticut hospitals have been cited by the federal government for overuse of restraints and seclusions involving psychiatric patients. When the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services released for the first time data on hospital restraints it was an opportunity to report on the restraint practices at Connecticut's hospitals.
  • Back Home: The Enduring Battles Facing Post-9/11 Veterans

    Since Sept.11, 2001, more than 2.6 million veterans have returned from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to a county largely unprepared to meet their needs and a government that has failed on multiple levels to fulfill the obligations demanded by Congress and promised by both Republican and Democratic administrations. This eight-month investigation documents these failures and others issues in a multimedia platform that includes interactive graphics, video and written storytelling, photographs and a documentary.
  • Civilian Casualties in Afghanistan

    This multi-part print and online investigation, including an extensive, interactive database of incidents involving the deaths of Afghan civilians at the hands of U.S and allied forces, provides the first comprehensive look into collateral damage in the war in Afghanistan over the years 2001 through 2013.* Approximately 30,000 words in all, the package of articles uncovers faulty and profoundly inadequate efforts to count the dead and to keep track of civilian casualties, the gaps and missteps involved in efforts by the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) and its office for protection of civilians to account for civilian casualties, serious flaws in the U.S. military’s (classified) database called the Civilian Casualty Tracking Cell (and parallel units), and the lack of any serious effort by the Pentagon to create an Office of Civilian Protection for “lessons learned.” The package examines the practice of lethal profiling of so-called “military age males” throughout the U.S. chain of command and exposes its pernicious effect on American rules of engagement in Afghanistan. It also reports on studies, including those performed by the U.S. military itself, on the measurable and quantifiable effect of civilian casualties in “creating insurgents.” In additional features published online, we report on the haphazard record-keeping and lack of a coherent policy when it comes to payment of reparations for civilians killed in Afghanistan. And we closely examine three mass-casualty incidents involving Afghan civilians, tracing how they resulted from changes in the Pentagon’s own commander directives and guidelines to the troops in the field. *The interactive database concludes at the end of 2012, the last year for which a full data set was available at the time of publication.
  • Back Home: The Enduring Battles Facing Post-9/11 Veterans

    Since Sept.11, 2001, more than 2.6 million veterans have returned from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to a county largely unprepared to meet their needs and a government that has failed on multiple levels to fulfill the obligations demanded by Congress and promised by both Republican and Democratic administrations. This eight-month investigation documents these failures and others issues in a multimedia platform that includes interactive graphics, video and written storytelling, photographs and a documentary.
  • 2001 Oak Ridge Nuclear Cavitation Confirmation Uncovered

    "2001 Oak Ridge Nuclear Cavitation Confirmation Uncovered" is a 12-part investigative series that appeared in the summer of 2013 in New Energy Times. The series is about the 2001-02 conflict surrounding experiments performed in the nuclear weapons facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The key events took place a decade ago, and the most crucial facts of this conflict had never been published. These facts reverse the commonly understood outcome of this scientific finding and correct the historical record. This investigation also reveals the dark side of science, how scientists can and do neglect their social responsibility, abuse their power, and behave unscientifically. It reveals the devastating price paid by other scientists who assume that scientific facts can speak for themselves, and how they fail to understand the tremendous impact of science media on public opinion.