Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "9/11" ...

  • The Daily News: The 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund

    During the course of reporting on the anniversary of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center, Daily News reporter Thomas Tracy spoke with an official on the record who said that the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund was running out of money. Tracy broke the news exclusively that the fund would not have enough money to help all survivors sickened at Ground Zero.
  • Fan Safety at Arrowhead

    In the wake of 9/11 and more recent terrorist attacks, the NFL has made fan safety at football stadiums a top priority. But we uncovered another kind of terror that's not getting much attention: fights caused by drunk, unruly fans. Our investigation revealed there are more reports of fights and assaults at Arrowhead than at stadiums in similar sized markets. In 2013, one of those Arrowhead fights claimed the life of a young man and father of a seven-week-old baby. His family and others assaulted at Arrowhead say there isn't enough security at the stadium to protect fans. http://fox4kc.com/2015/11/23/critics-say-violence-isnt-limited-to-collisions-on-the-gridiron-at-arrowhead-stadium/
  • My Brother's Bomber

    Who was really responsible for one of the worst terrorist attacks on Americans before 9/11? Broadcast as a three-part, serial investigation into the 1988 Lockerbie bombing, “My Brother’s Bomber” takes viewers on a journey to find the men who carried out the terrorist bombing of Pan Am Flight 103—an attack that killed 270 people from some twenty countries, including the filmmaker’s older brother David Dornstein. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/ http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/#video-2 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/#video-3
  • Dixie Cup Assassin

    The story of a reporter's 20-year plus relationship with a federal government informant identified as M.H., who turned into a contract assassin for the CIA in the war on terror.
  • Power Wars: Inside Obama's Post-9/11 Presidency

    Power Wars is a comprehensive investigative history of national security legal policymaking during the Obama presidency. Based on interviews with more than 150 officials and access to numerous internal documents, it takes readers behind the scenes to explain why the administration governed as it did on surveillance, drone strikes, Guantanamo, interrogations, military commissions, secrecy, leak investigations, war powers, and executive power. Bringing large amounts of new information to light about internal deliberations and never-before-reported memos and events, it equips readers to grapple with the recurring accusation that Obama has acted like Bush and to understand the legacy of both presidencies. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316286575
  • The Sting: How the FBI created a terrorist

    With access to sealed FBI transcripts that were placed under a federal protective order, "The Sting" reveals how the FBI entrapped a 27-year-old mentally ill Muslim and Kosovar refugee in a counterterrorism sting. While they publicly described Sami Osmakac as a danger to national security, FBI agents privately called him a "retarded fool" whose targets were "wishy-washy" and provided him with weapons and money that he never would have been able to obtain otherwise. "The Sting" is the first behind-the-scenes account of how the FBI operates its controversial counterterrorism stings, which since 9/11 have been responsible for the conviction on federal terrorism charges of more than 175 Muslims in the United States.
  • The Narco-Terror Trap

    This project traces the Drug Enforcement Administration’s use of a little-known statute of the Patriot Act to create a role for itself in the war on terror, based largely on unsubstantiated assertions that terrorists were using the drug trade to finance attacks against the United States. The statute, adopted with broad bi-partisan support, allows the D.E.A. to pursue so-called narco-terrorists anywhere in the world, even when none of their alleged crimes occurred on American soil. Between 2002 and 2008, the agency’s budget for foreign operations increased by some 75 percent, which supported expansions into Afghanistan, Eastern Europe, and West Africa. But an examination of the D.E.A.’s narco-terrorism cases reveals that most unraveled as they proceeded through court. The cases relied heavily on sting operations, and the only evidence of any links between terrorists and traffickers was concocted by the D.E.A., which used highly-paid informants to lure targets into staged narco-terrorism conspiracies. The first piece tells the story of three small-time smugglers from Mali who were arrested in West Africa, transported to New York and accused as narco-terrorists with links to Al-Qaeda. It explains how the D.E.A.’s narco-terrorism campaign began in the arrest-first-ask-questions-later period that followed 9/11. And it details the negligible contributions that the effort, whose total cost remains unknown, has made to keeping the country safe from either terrorists or drug traffickers. Nearly three years after the Malian’s arrest, a judge found that the men were not linked to Al-Qaeda, and that they had been motivated to participate in the D.E.A.’s fake conspiracy by an informant’s offer to pay them millions of dollars. The second piece uses an interactive comic – ProPublica’s first – to bring a sharper focus to the patterns in the DEA’s cases. It uses five different narco-terrorism operations in five different parts of the world. The interactivity of the comic allows readers to see how the agency’s stings use essentially the same script in order to make disparate targets fit the designated crime. https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/narco
  • Objective Troy: A Terrorist, A President, and the Rise of the Drone

    Objective Troy tells the story of the life and death of Anwar al-Awlaki, the American imam who denounced 9/11 and called for bridge-building between Muslims and the United States, only to leave the U.S., grow steadily more militant and join Al Qaeda in Yemen. He became the most effective recruiter for Al Qaeda in English; actively plotted to kill Americans, including by coaching the underwear bomber who tried to blow up an airliner over Detroit in 2009; and finally became the first American citizen to be deliberately killed in a drone strike, on orders of President Obama in 2011. The book’s title comes from Awlaki’s code name on the government’s kill list: during a frantic 20-month manhunt that engaged all of the intelligence agencies, Awlaki was Objective Troy. Reported all over the United States and in Yemen, Objective Troy is the most detailed and best-documented account of the life of a central figure in the post-9/11 history of terrorism. Among the revelations in the book are: the first account of Awlaki’s embrace of fundamentalist Islam, while a freshman at Colorado State; the real reason that Awlaki left the United States, abandoning a promising career as a mainstream spokesman for American Muslims; an intelligence mistake in the hunt for Awlaki that led to the disastrous unintentional killing by drone of a popular Yemeni deputy governor; and Awlaki’s afterlife on the Internet, including more than 40,000 YouTube videos, now with the added authority of what his admirers see as martyrdom. The book gives the fullest account to date of President Obama’s embrace of the armed drone as a weapon against terrorism and how its performance has fallen short of the government’s claims.
  • Government: Exposed and Accountable

    This series seeks to hold government accountable and expose undue government secrecy when it occurs. 28 Pages tells the little known story of the redacted parts of the Congressional investigation into 9/11, fourteen years after the fact. Viral Threat is our original investigation into a medical mystery the CDC doesn’t want to talk about. We discovered a strong link between an emerging polio-like virus and a new disease that’s paralyzed children nationwide. In Afghan Oasis, we investigate the maddening taxpayer waste surrounding “64k”: a U.S. military building the military didn’t ask for, said it wouldn’t use and never occupied. $36 million was spent over the objections of generals on the ground. Running on “E” is our original look at how close the Obama administration got to its goal of putting one million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. https://youtu.be/Vf6ZKLe9xoo
  • Informants

    “Informants” tells the stories of three paid FBI informants who posed as Muslims as they searched for people interested in joining violent plots concocted by the FBI. With extraordinary access to FBI agents and their informants, as well as undercover recordings, Al Jazeera’s documentary raises questions about whether the men targeted would have acted at all were it not for the paid informants working on the cases. It also brings into question one of the government’s favored domestic counter-terrorism tools after 9/11. The film features never-before-seen video from FBI undercover sting operations and interviews with three former FBI informants; reveals new information about the crimes FBI informants committed while working for the government; exposes how the FBI targeted one young man for recruitment as an informant; features an exclusive interview with a man convicted on terrorism charges in one of the highest-profile federal cases of the last decade; and reveals the identity of one of the FBI’s secret informants. “Informants” is an evocative documentary that breaks new ground covering and questioning U.S. national security policy.