Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Asia" ...

  • Plunder and Patronage in the Heart of Central Asia

    “Plunder and Patronage in the Heart of Central Asia” exposes a massive outflow of dark money from Kyrgyzstan, one of the world’s poorest nations. Reporters revealed how, over the span of five years, more than $700 million were funnelled out of the country — and across the world — by a single man: a self-confessed money launderer named Aierken Saimaiti. Saimaiti was murdered during the course of the reporting. But before his death, he provided reporters with a trove of documents that enabled them to piece together where this money came from, how it was moved abroad, and where much of it ended up.
  • Dog Food Dangers - What's Really In Pet Food

    This year-long investigation uncovered the euthanasia drug, Pentobarbital, in pet food and resulted in the recall of more than 100 million cans of food and an ongoing FDA investigation. This was one of the largest pet food recalls in history. Our story exposed a pattern of poor supply-chain control and government regulations unenforced.
  • Dog Food Dangers - What's Really In Pet Food

    This year-long investigation uncovered the euthanasia drug, Pentobarbital, in pet food and resulted in the recall of more than 100 million cans of food and an ongoing FDA investigation. This was one of the largest pet food recalls in history. Our story exposed a pattern of poor supply-chain control and government regulations unenforced.
  • MU's Asian students reluctant to report episodes of discrimination, racism

    The story is to reveal untold stories related to racial discrimination against MU's Asian students. While Na was speaking with more than 100 Asian students and several MU officials who were devising a diversity training that would be mandated for MU freshmen to take, he found several Asian students had undergone obvious racial mistreatment, but were not willing to report; and MU officials did not know of these racial instances suffered among MU Asian students.
  • How Much Does Your Vote Count

    Using census data and swing state forecasts, this story explores how the electoral college and differences in turnout affect the voting power of Americans of different ages, genders, and races. It includes an interactive tool that lets readers explore the data and calculate their personal voting power score. We found that because many of them live in relatively “safe” states, the power of Black, Hispanic and Asian-American voters to choose the president was lower than that of white voters.
  • Terror in Little Saigon

    FRONTLINE and ProPublica team up to investigate a wave of terror that targeted Vietnamese-American journalists. Uncovering a trail that leads from American cities to jungles in Southeast Asia, FRONTLINE and ProPublica shine new light on a series of unsolved murders and attacks. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/terror-in-little-saigon/
  • The Outlaw Ocean

    Lawlessness reigns on the high seas, with kidnapping, indenturing and even killing among a largely invisible global work force, and environmental crimes rampant as porous laws, questions about jurisdiction and lack of enforcement have failed to stem abuses. http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003630578 http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/100000003697113/five-men-killed-at-sea.html http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/asia/100000003660720/drugged-kidnapped-and-enslaved.html http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003675414 http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003675416
  • Qatar: The Price of Glory 2015

    The Price of Glory is an HBO Real Sports investigation into Qatar’s plan to achieve international recognition through sport and the price it has exacted in fair play, human rights, and even human lives. Our investigation found that the Qatari sports plan is one of unprecedented ambition and ruthlessness, based on the exploitation of foreign labor on and off the field. To build world-class athletic teams, Qatar has crisscrossed the world, paying athletes from the poorest countries on earth to become naturalized Qatari citizens. Real Sports heard it first hand from an entire team of Bulgarian weightlifters paid by Qatar to assume Arabic identities and represent the Gulf state in international competition. Our story detailed the systemic bribery that allowed this stiflingly hot desert sheikhdom without a soccer tradition to improbably win the right to host the 2022 World Cup. Ten months before a series of arrests of FIFA officials suspected of taking bribes, Real Sports spoke with a former FIFA insider about the corrupt bidding process, and detailed how Qatari officials bought their way to the very top of world soccer by plying FIFA officials on five continents. Off the field, Real Sports documented how Qatar’s sports glory is built on the backs of hundreds of thousands of the poorest people in Asia, imported and indentured to create a lavish World Cup city in the desert. Our team watched workers toil in 117-degree heat and followed them into the decrepit labor camps few outsiders have seen in order to expose the brutal conditions in which they are bonded into effective slavery. Viewers will see why thousands of these migrant workers are projected to die on the job by the time the 2022 World Cup games begin. When we first aired the piece the Qatari government told us changes were coming and that we should stand by. We took them up on their offer and revisited the situation a year later, only to find that none of the changes to the bonded labor system—known as Kafala—had taken place. In fact Nepali migrant workers were even prohibited from returning home after a massive earthquake ravaged their country. Worse still—our follow-up investigation found that some of the top people in Qatari sport weren’t just using their money to buy athletes, they were using it to fund terrorist organizations and invite radical jihadi clerics to speak at their elite sports academy. Our project spanned four years of research, four continents, and scores of interviews with athletes, activists, migrant workers, FIFA insiders, and US government officials.
  • Census Records Show Asian Population Boom

    Using Census records, this story looks into a dramatic shift in the demographic profile of Fairfax County in Virginia, one of the largest counties in the country. The records showed different Asian subgroups growing at different rates in different parts of the county, trends that were personified by tracking down people whose stories reflected the data. There's also an interactive map to show which parts of the county were seeing the largest increase.
  • Most trafficked mammal

    The pangolin -- a little-known, scale-covered mammal -- is thought by scientists to be the most trafficked mammal in the world. Conservationists fear it could go extinct before most people realize it exists. To try to ensure that doesn’t happen, CNN’s John Sutter traveled, at times undercover, to Vietnam and Indonesia to introduce readers and viewers to this loveably introverted creature, and to expose the massive, illegal trade in its meat and scales. Traveling alone, and at times using hidden cameras and recording devices, Sutter met with wildlife traffickers and pangolin in Sumatra, Indonesia. He followed undercover wildlife cops in Hanoi, Vietnam, to a number of restaurants and markets that deal in pangolin products. This work exposed the ease with which pangolin traders are able to operate in these countries, in part because the pangolin has maintained a lower profile than rhinos and elephants. It also helped explain the rise in demand for pangolin scales and meat in Southeast Asia. Sutter’s work also humanized and popularized the pangolin, a creature he described as “elusive, nocturnal, rarely appreciated and barely understood.”