Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Buffalo" ...

  • So Close, Yet So Costly

    The Great Lakes is experiencing a water affordability crisis that has driven families into debt and led to thousands of people losing access to water. An investigation by APM Reports and Great Lakes Today examined the cost of water over the last 10 years in the six largest cities on the Great Lakes - Chicago, Cleveland, Milwaukee, Detroit, Buffalo and Duluth. In the past decade water rates have been rising alarmingly fast, sometimes as much as 200%. As water gets more and more expensive, poor families and communities of color have been hit the hardest. Government run utilities have issued over 360,000 water shutoff notices in the past decade, concentrated in majority black and Latino neighborhoods.
  • Fall From Grace: How Buffalo's Bishop Hid Sexual Abuse in the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo

    Damning documents from a confidential source were the basis for our three-part series on Bishop Richard J. Malone, which showed that Malone returned an accused child abuser to ministry after a previous bishop removed him; allowed another abusive priest to remain pastor of a wealthy parish despite multiple abuse allegations; and deceived the faithful by hiding the "real" abuse list -- containing more than 100 priests -- from the public.
  • Lead Poisoning in Erie County and Buffalo

    Buffalo’s lead poisoning problem due to old housing stock and water utilities is getting out of hand. Investigative Post found that both the Erie County Water Authority and the Buffalo Water Board cut corners in their lead sampling programs for drinking water.
  • Buffalo Billion

    Investigative Post has been covering the Buffalo Billion since its inception, including a 2014 story on a curiously worded Request for Proposals that appeared to limit the field to one local developer – a major donor to the governor. In late 2015, news broke that U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara was investigating the awarding of contracts on the biggest Buffalo Billion project – the state’s commitment to spend $750 million to build and equip a factory for SolarCity, a solar panel manufacturer. Investigative Post continued to cover the Buffalo Billion, and similar initiatives in other Upstate cities, throughout 2016.
  • Bird-dogging the Buffalo Billion

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo launched the "Buffalo Billion" program in 2012 with the intention of revitalizing the Western New York economy. Investigative Post's reporting documented the extraordinary lengths to which Cuomo administration has gone to withhold disclosure of how the $1 billion is being spent. Our reporting also revealed that lucrative development contracts were awarded to major donors to Cuomo's campaign committee and that SolarCity, the major beneficiary of the state's spending, is losing vast amounts of money and under federal investigation. Subsequent reporting detailed that minority hiring goals for the SolarCity project, involving the construction of a $750 million solar panel manufacturing plant, were lowered and that African Americans made up less than 6 percent of the workforce.
  • Abusing the Law

    Sexual abuse by police officers is a pervasive problem. An officer in America wields his power or status for sexual gratification every five days, on average. Those are the ones who are caught. The actual numbers are almost certainly higher because sex crimes go widely unreported, even when the suspects are not cops. The Buffalo News compiled a database of more than 700 cases of police sexual abuse or misconduct and analyzed the variables. Typical offenders were not rookies. They had almost a decade of experience with their departments. In a surprising number of cases, children and adolescents were their targets.
  • We Sell Houses (and Sometimes Ruin Lives)

    Scott Wizig is a Houston-based real estate king with an appalling track record in Houston, Buffalo, and Baltimore. Houston Press first reported on Wizig in 2004, after he was run out of Buffalo. They decided to follow up on him in 2014 after a group of community non-profits in Baltimore sued him for sitting on dozens of vacant, blighted homes that were deemed health and safety hazards. The Texas Department of Savings and Mortgage Lending appears to be the only Texas entity keeping an eye on Wizig, but even though he's repeatedly violated disclosure laws, the penalties are a pittance. Wizig also has exploited flaws in county record-keeping and eviction courts that have allowed him to foreclose on property he doesn't really own.
  • The Scajaquada is a crippled creek

    The story got started in 2013 when reporter Dan Telvock noticed raw sewage in a section of the creek that passes through Buffalo’s prized Delaware Park and a strong urine smell in a section of the creek that runs through Buffalo’s largest cemetery. In May 2013, the state enacted the Sewage Pollution Right to Know Act, which for the first time provided a public database of most sewage overflows by locality. This data shows that the most sewer overflows happen in Scajaquada Creek and the biggest offender is Cheektowaga’s sewer system. From there, Telvock used the state Freedom of Information Law to obtain hundreds of documents that detailed Cheektowaga’s sewer overflows, to include volumes and locations.
  • Reaching New Heights

    Students at the University of Buffalo were (and continue) to rent poorly - and often illegally- structured off-campus houses that put their lives in danger. This piece looks into why this is happening, who is responsible, and what prevention measures the university and the city are taking.
  • A Shameful Low in Higher Education

    "This article uncovered flagrant disregard of the rights of disabled students at the University of Buffalo and highlighted how the university was breaking laws outlined by the ADA"