Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "CDC" ...

  • Bitten: The Secret History of Lyme Disease and Biological Weapons

    The first reported cases of Lyme disease surfaced in 1968; a half century later, CDC scientists believe there could be more than 300,000 new cases in the US every year. As this and other debilitating tick-borne diseases continue to spread, their origins have remained elusive. Some believe global warming is fueling the epidemic, others attribute it to human migration. But the fundamental question persists: where did Lyme disease come from? This mystery prompted Stanford University science writer and Lyme disease survivor Kris Newby to launch an investigation that led her to startling discoveries linking the outbreak to America’s clandestine biological warfare program. In BITTEN: The Secret History of Lyme Disease and Biological Weapons (Harper Wave; May 14, 2019; ISBN: 978-006-289-6278; 352 pages; $26.99)—a riveting work of scientific reportage and biography that reads like a thriller—Newby reveals the story of Willy Burgdorfer, the man who discovered the microbe behind the disease, and his role in covering up evidence that could implicate another tick- borne organisms in the original outbreak.
  • The Uncounted

    Reuters found failures in tracking dangerous drug-resistant infections at every level, from the hospital bed to state health departments to the CDC in Atlanta.
  • PUSHING PAIN: PROFITS BEFORE PATIENTS

    The amount of painkillers dispensed in the U.S. nearly quadrupled from 1999-2010 even though the amount of pain Americans have reported has not changed, resulting in what the Centers for Disease Control and prevention calls an epidemic which takes over twenty thousand lives each year. This was an impetus for Reporter Dina Gusovsky to investigate a publicly traded specialty pharmaceutical company called Insys Therapeutics, which is accused of contributing to these grim statistics. It’s main revenue generating drug is a highly addictive opiate one hundred times more powerful that morphine, which the FDA says should only be used for late stage cancer pain; however, the company is now being investigated in at least six states for pushing the drug far beyond cancer patients, engaging in kickback schemes, off-label marketing, and other illegal business practices all in attempt to grow profits. Two days after our report first aired, which included exclusive interviews with whistleblowers and investigators, the company’s CEO resigned. http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000444339&play=1 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000445892&play=1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m9Uy3eDqzUc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP28vnux3yI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXFetMnNJSk
  • Hidden Threat: The Kissing bug

    This investigation by KXAS-TV and The Dallas Morning News revealed kissing bugs may pose a much more significant threat to human health in Texas than the CDC has ever indicated. The bugs carry a dangerous parasite, a silent killer that can lead to heart failure and death. They have already infected hundreds of thousands of people in South America, Central America and Mexico. But, our team of reporters and producers discovered kissing bugs have also infected at least ten people in Texas. A fact revealed for the first time exclusively in the first report. Hundreds of dogs in the state are sick and many are dying. Even more concerning, the human and animal toll may be much higher than the numbers show, because few people or dogs are ever tested for the disease. This series was also the first to demonstrate how the nation’s blood supply may be at risk from kissing bugs and a lack of regulations to prevent the spread of the parasite through blood transfusions. Our reports had an immediate impact, alerting thousands of people to the presence of the bugs and the dangers they bring. Hundreds of Texans responded by sending bugs to the state lab for testing and other news organizations across the country picked up our reports taking our findings to an even wider audience. https://youtu.be/a2xykL8ixSs
  • Biolabs In Your Backyard: Inside America's secretive biolabs

    A USA TODAY NETWORK investigation revealed hundreds of safety accidents have occurred at secretive biolabs that have proliferated under U.S. counterterrorism policies, yet fragmented regulation lets troubled facilities keep experimenting with dangerous pathogens. Labs and regulators – often citing federal bioterrorism laws -- fought reporters seeking access to even basic information about lab accidents as well as government inspections and enforcement actions. The series has resulted in congressional investigations, an internal CDC review that prompted the replacement of a top lab regulator, and a White House recommendation for greater transparency and public accountability about lab operations and accidents.
  • Government: Exposed and Accountable

    This series seeks to hold government accountable and expose undue government secrecy when it occurs. 28 Pages tells the little known story of the redacted parts of the Congressional investigation into 9/11, fourteen years after the fact. Viral Threat is our original investigation into a medical mystery the CDC doesn’t want to talk about. We discovered a strong link between an emerging polio-like virus and a new disease that’s paralyzed children nationwide. In Afghan Oasis, we investigate the maddening taxpayer waste surrounding “64k”: a U.S. military building the military didn’t ask for, said it wouldn’t use and never occupied. $36 million was spent over the objections of generals on the ground. Running on “E” is our original look at how close the Obama administration got to its goal of putting one million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. https://youtu.be/Vf6ZKLe9xoo
  • Ebola Crisis: Unprepared in Dallas

    For months in the summer of 2014, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had warned the country’s health-care community that an outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in Western Africa could make its way here. The feds assured the public that America’s modern medical resources and infrastructure could avert a crisis. We were told hospitals had prepared and trained their staffs, using CDC guidelines, to address a virus they had never seen. Yet in late September, when a Liberian man named Thomas Eric Duncan walked into a Dallas emergency room with fever, headache and abdominal pains, his doctor and nurses found him unremarkable – just another of the night’s many victims of mishap and contagion. He was sent away after a few hours with antibiotics. None of the caregivers realized the encounter would soon become part of U.S. medical history.
  • NAACP President / Phantom Nonprofit

    In late 2013, members of the Philadelphia NAACP began to question how that group’s finances had been handled by its president, Jerome Whyatt Mondesire. Eventually, more than twenty members of the group, including most of its executive committee, co-wrote a letter to Mondesire asking for answers to 22 questions about the group’s finances, especially why funds meant for the group appeared to have passed through another nonprofit organization, apparently run by Mondesire himself. AxisPhilly obtained that letter and, on January 21, 2014 first published it. An AxisPhilly investigation began to look into what the answers to them were. Over the course of 2014, they published six stories detailing the convoluted and troubling connections between the local NAACP branch’s finances and the Next Generation CDC, a separate (and legally-defunct) nonprofit controlled by NAACP president Jerome Whyatt Mondesire. That nonprofit, they discovered, had acquired property, donations, and hundreds of thousands of dollars in the name of the storied civil rights organization, apparently without the knowledge of its members and for uses that were not only unrelated to the storied civil rights group but appear to have been made up or which benefited Mondesire personally.
  • No Small Thing: An investigative series on Lyme disease

    This series – testament to the power of a small newspaper, the Internet and analytical reporting -- is viewed widely as an influential force and agenda setter for Lyme disease nationwide. In eight installments in 2012, No Small Thing delineated problems of testing for and treatment and tracking of Lyme disease. In 2013, the newspaper, using 3,000 pages of government emails obtained under FOIA, exposed ties between government officials and outside scientists that influenced Lyme policy and limited debate – the installment submitted here. In 2013, the series also reported evidence that physicians are rejecting controversial guidelines, documented the death toll from Lyme disease using a database of deaths covering 13 years and drove a watershed year in the endemic. In 2013, the CDC revised contested annual case counts tenfold; investigated long-ignored deaths, and invited reform advocates to an unprecedented, high-level meeting. Three Lyme-related bills are pending in New York, where a task force has been convened. Another is pending in Congress.
  • No Small Thing

    The Poughkeepsie Journal series “No Small Thing” goes where no other newspaper or media outlet has – it challenges the mainstream medical dogma on Lyme disease. In rigorously documented articles, Projects Writer Mary Beth Pfeiffer concludes that the major actors in this public health scandal -- chiefly the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Infectious Disease Society of America – have minimized and mismanaged a burgeoning epidemic of tick-borne disease at great harm to thousands of infected people. These two powerful institutions have held – in policy and pronouncement -- that Lyme disease is easy to diagnose and easy to cure. It is neither.