Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Congo" ...

  • VICE News with The Investigative Fund: A Slaughter in Silence

    In a series of reports for VICE News, in partnership with The Investigative Fund, Nick Turse investigated a startling campaign of violence that swept through Djugu territory in the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Ituri province in late 2017 and early 2018.
  • FRONTLINE: UN Sex Abuse Scandal

    An investigation into sex abuse by United Nations peacekeepers in the world’s conflict zones. Award-winning correspondent Ramita Navai traces allegations from Congo to the Central African Republic, with firsthand accounts from survivors, witnesses and officials.
  • Deceptive Diplomacy - Cover-up by the UN

    An international team of investigative reporters revealed how top UN officials covered up crucial information about the murder of the UN experts Zaida Catalán and Michael Sharp in the Democratic Republic of Congo last year.
  • Deceptive Diplomacy - Cover-up by the UN

    An international team of investigative reporters revealed how top UN officials covered up crucial information about the murder of the UN experts Zaida Catalán and Michael Sharp in the Democratic Republic of Congo last year.
  • China Storms Africa

    China's drive for resources in Africa has depleted one sub-Saharan country after another is wreaking havoc environmentally and morally as corruption is on the rise and workers are being exploited.
  • China in Africa: Young Workers, Deadly Mines

    Reporters found a Chinese-directed mining industry in Congo that exploited teenagers to risk their lives mining ore. China promised the Congo government a $9 billion loan for access to the mines, but the payment never arrived.
  • All Mine

    "All Mine" details how the U.S. government facilitated a modern-day land grab by a politically connected American company in one of the world's poorest countries. Phoenix-based mining company Freeport McMoRan was able to purchase the world's largest copper mine from the the government of Congo at an extremely cheap rate because it made its play under the cloud of the world's deadliest conflict site since World War II, a climate of corruption and desperation. It did so with the help of $400 million in U.S. government financing, and intense lobbying from an employee of the U.S. Embassy in Congo -- a career diplomat who rushed through the revolving door to work for the mining company just weeks after the deal was finalized. Freeport McMoRan has a generously paid spokesman, not to mention millions in lobbying dollars, to get its story out. The report also includes interviews with Congolese people who were forced from their land and threatened with arrest for speaking with reporters.
  • Peace at what price?

    The authors investigated reports of abuse at the hands of the UN peacekeepers in Democratic Republic of Congo. A well known secret within the UN the rape and abuse of the community have left consequences far more damming than the remnants of war.
  • "Peace at What Price?"

    ABC news documented the extent of abuse U.N. peacekeepers have been inflicting on women and children in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Although reports of child pornography, rape and paedophile rings have been rampant, U.N. officials have refused to allow either military or civilian employees to be tried, and even have refused to cooperate with further investigation of its personnel.
  • Phillips in Africa: Coltan (Colombite Tantalite); Zimbabwe business grab

    CBS News reports on the Congo civil war. The first part of the investigation finds that the efforts to stop the war have failed, "in part because Western companies are helping pay for it." Coltan, a mineral essential for the production of computer chips and high-tech devices, has kept the war going because African governments, middlemen and rebels have become "interested in loot as much as politics." The second segment reports on a land dispute in Zimbabwe, which has caused racial conflicts. The threats to white farmers and business-owners have forced some of them to try to escape to South Africa.