Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "DNA" ...

  • 48 Hours: Was Kevin Cooper Framed?

    An in-depth report chronicling the conviction of Kevin Cooper and his 34-year fight to clear his name.
  • University of Utah Student Killed; Who Is Murder Suspect Ayoola Ajayi?

    Twelve days after the disappearance of University of Utah student, Mackenzie Lueck this summer, and following an exhaustive investigation by law enforcement, police arrested and formally charged the suspect in her death, Ayoola Adisa Ajayi. Ajayi faces four charges in connection to Lueck’s violent murder, including aggravated murder and aggravated kidnapping. KSL Investigators knew Ajayi was the person of interest in this case because he owned the small property in Salt Lake where multiple search warrants were executed in the case prior to his arrest. Before authorities released his name to the public, KSL Investigators worked to learn everything they could about the 31-year-old immigrant, originally from Africa, so we could break the investigation as soon as the suspect’s name was released. Although much of a person’s immigration status is private information, representatives with the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office confirmed Ajayi is a lawful legal resident and he was at the time of his arrest. However, the KSL Investigators exposed how he came to this country and revealed possible oversight by Utah State University and the federal government when he dropped out of school a number of times and was posting online about seeking to find a wife to keep his citizenship status.
  • In the Dark

    “In the Dark” was a narrative investigative series, providing the anatomy of the faulty police investigation into the 1994 slayings of a young mother and her toddler son, Stacy Falcon Dewey and Jacob Dewey. The investigation allowed the truth to slip through the cracks despite DNA evidence that had linked a convicted murderer to the crime scene. The story uncovered emails and other records that showed how neglect and indifference by forensics examiners and prosecutors delayed the case, leaving the victims’ unwitting family to suffer for years without answers.
  • An Innocent Man?

    Newsday’s multi-media investigation “An Innocent Man?” was the first to reveal widespread wrongdoing by Suffolk law-enforcement authorities in the 1975 Keith Bush murder conviction, one of the longest-running “innocent man” cases in U.S. history. In a year-long investigation, Newsday reporter Thomas Maier detailed: how police allegedly beat a false confession out of then-17-year-old Bush for the 1975 sex-related murder of schoolmate Sherese Watson; how forensic experts offered flawed evidence about Bush’s guilt and later lost the alleged murder weapon; how the prosecution’s main witness against Bush later recanted and said she made up all of her testimony; how DNA evidence pointing to Bush’s innocence was rejected; and, mostly significantly, how Bush’s trial prosecutor covered-up evidence of another potential suspect, John W. Jones Jr., who placed himself at the murder scene. That evidence about Jones remained a secret and Bush was convicted and sent to prison for 33 years. Newsday’s investigation began in June 2018 and the resulting 15,000-word print report and an accompanying documentary were published together in May 2019. Shortly afterward, a report by the current Suffolk County district attorney concluded that Bush had been wrongly convicted and a judge vacated his sentence – 44 years later. Several follow-ups by Newsday detailed reaction to the Bush case and were reflected in an updated documentary, written by Maier and edited by Newsday owner Patrick Dolan, which was posted on December 31, 2019. Maier’s painstaking work – which involved dozens of interviews and thousands of pages of legal documents – shed light on a tragic incident in the past and helped result in other similar cases receiving a thorough investigation.
  • WCPO: DNA Delay

    A tip from a rape victim leads WCPO Investigative Reporter Hillary Lake to uncover a DNA testing delay at the Kentucky State Crime Lab affecting thousands of new criminal cases, from assaults to rapes to murders, waiting on results to move forward in the justice system. The investigation leads to action from the Kentucky attorney general.
  • The Marshall Project: Exploiting the Exonerated

    Two mentally disabled brothers spent 30 years in prison before DNA exonerated them of the rape and murder of an 11 year old girl. Once free, the very people supposed to help and protect them - their sister, lawyers and self-described advocates - preyed on them and ripped off hundreds of thousands of dollars.
  • She Says

    WFAE’s She Says is an investigative podcast series that followed the story of a sexual assault survivor in Charlotte, NC and the long and difficult process of finding justice. Over the course of the series, award-winning WFAE reporter/host, Sarah Delia and reporter Alex Olgin investigated how our criminal justice system handles sexual assault cases on a local and national level. In addition to conversations with the sexual assault survivor at the heart of this story, the podcast features interviews with current and former law enforcement, specialized nurses, DNA experts, and other sexual assault survivors.
  • Power Price Spike; State Takes Action

    In this half-hour special, the I-Team re-visits some of its more than 40 stories during 2018, investigating Maine's largest utility company and a mysterious spike in usage. Thousands of Central Maine Power customers said their bills doubled or tripled and they couldn't figure out why. The I-Team asked to see those bills and hundreds of customers submitted copies. The I-Team spent days analyzing those bills and provided the data and analysis to state regulators. Hours after the data was turned over, state regulators launched an investigation.
  • Mexico's Crackdown on Central American Migrants

    In January and February 2015, In These Times reporter Joseph Sorrentino interviewed dozens of Central American migrants along one of Mexico's main migration routes. He found that a Mexican government initiative to more aggressively police and deport migrants had forced them to take slower and more dangerous routes, leaving them easier prey to robbery, rape, extortion, kidnapping, assault and murder by gangs and narcos. Mexico's stepped-up border enforcement was the result of U.S. pressure on Mexico to halt the "surge" of Central American children reaching the U.S. border.
  • The Outlaw Ocean

    Lawlessness reigns on the high seas, with kidnapping, indenturing and even killing among a largely invisible global work force, and environmental crimes rampant as porous laws, questions about jurisdiction and lack of enforcement have failed to stem abuses. http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003630578 http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/100000003697113/five-men-killed-at-sea.html http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/asia/100000003660720/drugged-kidnapped-and-enslaved.html http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003675414 http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003675416