Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "DWI" ...

  • The CBS Evening News with Norah O’Donnell: Chicago Wrong Raids

    The CBS Evening News and the WBBM investigative team revealed an alarming pattern of Chicago Police officers raiding the wrong homes, traumatizing innocent families and children, and, in the process, violating citizens’ Fourth Amendment rights. None of the officers involved had been disciplined or held accountable by the department.
  • Tainted Water

    Canadians have every reason to believe that the water that runs from their taps is beyond reproach: abundant, clean and safe. But the “Tainted Water” investigation, an unprecedented national collaboration of universities and news organizations, exposed the risks faced by millions of Canadians whose drinking water contains elevated levels of lead, a powerful, insidious neurotoxin, and other contaminants. Coordinated by the staff at the Institute for Investigative Journalism (IIJ), “Tainted Water” is the largest project of its kind in Canadian history, and possibly the largest student-led project worldwide. The consortium brought together more than 120 journalists, student journalists and faculty members from nine post-secondary institutions and six news organizations and their bureaus over a period of 18 months to report the series. Journalism students and reporters combined their findings and produced local, regional and national investigative features, released as a series of print, digital and TV stories, making international headlines.
  • Houston Chronicle: Out of Control

    When new residents of Houston first hit the roads, many come to the same realization: This is not normal. The highways are a labyrinthine mess. The motorists drive at extraordinarily high speed, often distracted. At night, drunk drivers weave in and out of traffic. Those factors lead to daily tragedy. Chronicle reporters knew the carnage was unusual. In 2016, they began investigating the scope of the problem. The findings: the greater Houston region was the nation’s deadliest major metro area for roadway fatalities, with more than 640 deaths annually – or the equivalent of three fully loaded 737s crashing and killing all aboard, every year. They found declining speeding enforcement, even as deaths rose. They also discovered similar results with DWI and distracted driving enforcement.
  • AP: Hidden Victims

    The Pentagon and DOJ often fail to provide basic justice when the children of service members sexually assault each other on American military bases worldwide.
  • Myanmar Burning

    A Reuters series documents the mass expulsion of the Rohingya from Myanmar, including the investigation that landed our reporters in prison.
  • Testing the Waters

    "Testing the Waters" is a two-part investigation into concerns of lead contamination in local drinking water on the Alabama Gulf Coast. After an extensive analysis of public records, FOX10 News Investigates found eight water systems across Mobile and Baldwin counties have had testing results above the legal limit for lead content in the last three years. Further, FOX10 News found local public schools were not previously testing for lead content, so we requested to test for them. As a result of our investigation, both Mobile and Baldwin County Public Schools started testing some of its older schools that could be at risk. Moreover, during the course of our investigation, the Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) has announced it will help test all public schools over the next three years.
  • Science for Sale

    Corporations facing lawsuits or stricter regulation are steering millions of dollars to scientific consulting firms, to the detriment of public health. As the Center for Public Integrity explains in “Science for Sale,” industry-backed research has exploded — often with the aim of obscuring the truth — as government-funded science dwindles. The effects of this phenomenon are felt not only in courtrooms but also in agencies that issue rules to try to prevent disease.
  • The Education of Edwin Raymond

    For a cover story in the New York Times Magazine, Investigative Fund reporter Saki Knafo uses exclusive, secretly recorded audio from one officer, Edwin Raymond, to expose the NYPD’s rigid insistence on fulfilling arrest quotas — and the racial biases behind them — despite public denials that such a quota system exists. The story sparked a follow-up investigation by NBC New York and coverage by several other outlets. Ultimately, the story resulted in the promotion of the whistleblowing officer.
  • The Traffickers: The Girl in the Window

    The Traffickers is an investigative documentary series which traces the global trafficking routes of some of the world’s most sought after commodities: Gold, exotic animals, sex, even human body parts - anything can be bought for a price. The aim was ambitious - to give an exclusive guide to the global black market world, with high production values, excellent cinematography, dynamic story-telling and outstanding journalism. The series is presented by Nelufar Hedayat, who herself was trafficked as a child refugee from war-torn Afghanistan. During the course of filming, Nelufar visited 22 different countries, criss-crossing the world to follow the story. The Dark Side of Adoption reveals how American couples adopting babies from the DRC can be caught up in an adoption scam which hoodwinks unsuspecting parents into giving up their children.
  • Hidden Dangers on America's Roads

    “Hidden Dangers on America’s Roads” is a compilation of CBS News investigations revealing lax government regulation and the unwillingness of automakers to address potentially fatal issues in transportation safety. Those issues include vehicle defects, outdated federal automotive safety standards and policies surrounding the medical qualifications, or lack thereof, of commercial interstate drivers. These stories exposed weaknesses that inspired members of Congress to push for an upgrade of federal motor vehicle safety standards, forced the National Highway Traffic Safety administration to launch programs to identify potential changes to standards and led to a recall of more than a million vehicles worldwide.