Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "Dictatorship" ...

  • The Biggest Bribe in Swedish History? TeliaSonera and Azerbaijan’s dictator

    As a result of Swedish Television's previous revelations, with suspected bribes in Uzbekistan, telecom TeliaSonera's new management said it would clean up the company's dirty past. But SVT, TT and the OCCRP this year revealed yet another suspect bribery affair - with a dictatorship – which the management had not reported to the police. It is by far the biggest alleged bribe in Sweden’s history, where the Swedish telecom giant is suspected of having enriched the Azerbaijani presidential family with up to 1 billion US dollars (depending on exchange rate) – for an asset taken from the Azeri people. [[https://www.occrp.org/corruptistan/azerbaijan/azerbaijan-telecom/offshores-close-to-president-paid-nothing-for-share-of-state-telecom.php#]] [[http://www.svt.se/ug/documents-reveal-telia-sonera-involved-in-suspected-large-scale-bribery]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh3CayWd29M]] [[https://www.occrp.org/corruptistan/azerbaijan/azerbaijan-telecom/khadija-calls-latest-teliasonera-bribe-story-dangerous.php]] [[https://www.occrp.org/en/investigations/2531-teliasoneras-behind-the-scenes-connection-to-azerbaijani-presidents-daughters]] [[https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxZjxumuFAv8Q1dWd2NSSnlFNGM/view]]
  • The Biggest Bribe in Swedish History? TeliaSonera and Azerbaijan’s dictator

    As a result of Swedish Television's previous revelations, with suspected bribes in Uzbekistan, telecom TeliaSonera's new management said it would clean up the company's dirty past. But SVT, TT and the OCCRP this year revealed yet another suspect bribery affair - with a dictatorship – which the management had not reported to the police. It is by far the biggest alleged bribe in Sweden’s history, where the Swedish telecom giant is suspected of having enriched the Azerbaijani presidential family with up to 1 billion US dollars (depending on exchange rate) – for an asset taken from the Azeri people. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh3CayWd29M
  • Hidden Wealth of Azerbaijan President

    The President of oil-rich Azerbaijan, Ilham Aliyev, has been compared to a Mafia crime boss in US diplomatic cables, and man analysts refer to him as a dictator. OCCRP looked deeper than those labels and found that the Aliyev family has systematically grabbed shares of the most profitable businesses in the country. Investigative reports by OCCRP and Radio Free Europe have revealed and more importantly proven for the first time that the ruling family has secret ownership stakes through offshore companies in the country’s largest businesses, including banks, construction companies, gold mines and phone companies. The government Aliyev runs gave these shares. The family also has secretly amassed high-end property in places like the Czech Republic. The Azeri government responded to the revelations first with silence and now claims that OCCRP is an agent of the rival Armenian government. Aliyev’s administration also failed to investigate the harassment and blackmail of OCCRP and RFE journalist Khadija Ismayilova earlier this year. While Azerbaijan has worked at improving its image worldwide, OCCRP’s reporting makes clear that a petty dictatorship remains in control.
  • Thai Shrimp Industry Exploits Workers to Whet Global Appetite for Cheap Shrimp

    Shrimp is big business in Thailand, thanks to an appetite in the United States that continues to grow. Today, a third of country’s exported shrimp goes to the U.S., its top customer, where retail giants like Walmart and Costco do high-volume sales and suburban Red Lobsters offer bargain blue plate specials. Breakthroughs in aquaculture have helped Thai producers keep up with the rising demand, but there’s a catch to their success: an invisible underclass of Burmese migrant workers, thousands of whom labor in sub-human conditions to keep costs down. Of the estimated 200,000 Burmese migrants working in Samut Sakhon province, the heartland of the Thai shrimp industry, about a third are unregistered and subject to rights abuses. Independent monitors say that thousands desperate to escape the poverty and dictatorship of their homeland cross the border only to find themselves trapped in bonded labor that’s tantamount to slavery. Sold by brokers to crooked factory owners, they are forced to endure long hours for pitiful wages, physical abuse and intimidation. Many are children who do not meet Thai working age requirements. Their plight is made worse, critics say, by the profit-induced apathy of Thai authorities who turn a blind eye or are complicit in abuses. Reporters Steve Sapienza and Jason Motlagh investigate exploitative labor practices at the lower levels of the supply chain.
  • Hidden Wealth of Azerbaijan President

    The President of oil-rich Azerbaijan, Ilham Aliyev, has been compared to a Mafia crime boss in US diplomatic cables, and man analysts refer to him as a dictator. OCCRP looked deeper than those labels and found that the Aliyev family has systematically grabbed shares of the most profitable businesses in the country. Investigative reports by OCCRP and Radio Free Europe have revealed and more importantly proven for the first time that the ruling family has secret ownership stakes through offshore companies in the country’s largest businesses, including banks, construction companies, gold mines and phone companies. The government Aliyev runs gave these shares. The family also has secretly amassed high-end property in places like the Czech Republic. The Azeri government responded to the revelations first with silence and now claims that OCCRP is an agent of the rival Armenian government. Aliyev’s administration also failed to investigate the harassment and blackmail of OCCRP and RFE journalist Khadija Ismayilova earlier this year. While Azerbaijan has worked at improving its image worldwide, OCCRP’s reporting makes clear that a petty dictatorship remains in control.
  • "Bloody Shame"

    Joshua Hammer and Will Bourne go deep into Africa to tell the story of how the Zimbabwean Army has violently taken over diamond fields as a means for illegal cash flow for itself. They go on to explain the failings of the Mugabe dictatorship and how the Kimberley Process has "failed miserably."
  • The Woman Who Disappeared Twice

    CNN en español investigates the disappearances of political dissidents in Argentina between 1976 and 1983. They follow the case of a woman whose body was thrown from an airplane into a river, where it was found by fishermen. Local officials said the body could not be identified, but that was not the case. CNN tracked down the victims family, one among thousands who disappeared in that bloody time.
  • Murder or Suicide?

    CBS 60 Minutes shadows "the most extensive foreign murder investigation in FBI history" - the death of Father John Kaiser, an American Catholic Priest in Kenya. While the FBI final conclusion was that Kaiser killed himself, several members of Congress believed he was murdered. CBS reported on "a strong potential motive for killing - that the priest was helping several young women sue a powerful Kenyan cabinet minister for rape." The priest also documented severe ethnic clashes in Kenya, and developed evidence that the brutal regime of President Daniel arap Moi was behind the violence. The reporters expose sloppy detective work on the case.
  • Two Indonesias, Two Americas

    Indonesia is replaying its year of living dangerously, with the potential again for a more democratic society or another spasm of military repression. How did the United States contribute to the dictatorship?
  • (Untitled)

    Dead Season is an investigation into a series of interrelated murders on the Philippine Island of Negros in a barrio with the unlikely name of Mambagaton, literally "the place of the ghosts." The investigation looks into the massacre of a peasant family, the death of a soldier who participated in the massacre -- and was allegedly murdered two weeks later as part of a cover-up -- the assassination of the town's wealthiest landlord, and the murder of an alleged military informant.