Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "DuPont" ...

  • The Record / NorthJersey.com: Toxic Secrets

    Record reporters explore a DuPont site's history to uncover why a plume of toxic groundwater remains under more than 400 Pompton Lakes, N.J., homes almost 30 years after the chemical company agreed to clean it up.
  • Chemical Breakdown

    A 2014 toxic gas release at DuPont’s pesticide plant outside Houston killed four workers and endangered the surrounding community. In response to those deaths, the Houston Chronicle delved deep into the chemical industry, and the way government regulates these potentially harmful facilities. The Chronicle partnered with experts at Texas A&M to establish a methodology for analyzing chemical inventories to create a potential harm index for facilities throughout the Houston area. Our investigation showed facilities with a high potential for harm were all over the metro area, the government has failed at every level to protect the public and the EPA's chosen solution - a network of local emergency planning committees is destined to fail.
  • Chemical Breakdown

    A 2014 toxic gas release at DuPont’s pesticide plant outside Houston killed four workers and endangered the surrounding community. In response to those deaths, the Houston Chronicle delved deep into the chemical industry, and the way government regulates these potentially harmful facilities. The Chronicle partnered with experts at Texas A&M to establish a methodology for analyzing chemical inventories to create a potential harm index for facilities throughout the Houston area. Our investigation showed facilities with a high potential for harm were all over the metro area, the government has failed at every level to protect the public and the EPA's chosen solution - a network of local emergency planning committees is destined to fail.
  • Fatal Leak

    After four DuPont workers were killed in a plant accident in La Porte, the Chronicle put its investigative team in charge of the follow-up. The reporters quickly discovered that the company failed to respond properly to the accident and had put its workers at risk by not providing necessary safety equipment. Further investigation revealed another DuPont worker's brush with death and illustrated how DuPont's safety record had slipped in recent years.
  • Rape in the Fields/ Violación de un Sueño

    Rape in the Fields/Violación de un Sueño is an unprecedented broadcast partnership between FRONTLINE and Univision Documentaries (Documentales Univision), which joined forces to bring this powerful and underreported story to a broad, diverse and multi-lingual audience. Winner of the 2013 Dupont-Columbia Silver Baton, the film was broadcast on two national networks, in two languages reaching millions of viewers. Led by Correspondent Lowell Bergman, the project was a yearlong effort by the Investigative Reporting Program at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism and the Center for Investigative Reporting. It shed light on pervasive sexual assault against the immigrant women who pick and handle the food we eat every day.
  • Can You Fight Poverty With A Five-Star Hotel?

    My story is about the World Bank’s private investing arm, the International Finance Corporation, the IFC. It reveals that the IFC is a profit-oriented, deal-driven organization that not only fails to fight poverty, its stated mission, but may exacerbate it in its zeal to earn a healthy return on investment. The article details my investigation through hundreds of primary source and other documents, dozens of interviews around the world and my trip to Ghana to see many projects first-hand, to recount that the IFC hands out billions in cut-rate loans to wealthy tycoons and giant multinationals in some of the world’s poorest places. My story details the IFC’s investments with a who’s who of giant multinational corporations: Dow Chemical, DuPont, Mitsubishi, Vodafone, and many more. It outlines that the IFC funds fast-food chains like Domino's Pizza in South Africa and Kentucky Fried Chicken in Jamaica. It invests in upscale shopping malls in Egypt, Ghana, the former Soviet republics, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia. It backs candy-shop chains in Argentina and Bangladesh; breweries with global beer behemoths like SABMiller and with other breweries in the Czech Republic, Laos, Romania, Russia, and Tanzania; and soft-drink distribution for the likes of Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and their competitors in Cambodia, Ethiopia, Mali, Russia, South Sudan, Uzbekistan, and more. The criticism of most such investments -- from a broad array of academics, watchdog groups and local organizations in the poor countries themselves -- is that these investments make little impact on poverty and could just as easily be undertaken without IFC subsidies. In some cases, critics contend, the projects hold back development and exacerbate poverty, not to mention subjecting affected countries to pollution and other ills.
  • The Lost High Schools

    Thousands of New Castle County residents do not have a high school alma matter because seven high schools were shut down from 1969 to 1999. Thi investigation looks into why, and how these schools were shut down and what the alumni feel about no longer having a high school.
  • Ford Fires

    The authors investigation showed that the Ford F150 pickup truck was a potential fire hazard due to faulty cruise control switches. Their series of reports also showed that Ford as well as other companies may have known about the problem for the last five years and have hidden it.
  • Radioactive Water Flowed to Thousands of Homes

    This series detailed how high levels of radium 226/228, known human carcinogens linked to bone and nasal cancers, contaminated public drinking water wells that provided water to thousands of people in Northwest Florida between 1996-2000. The public utility responsible for water safety resisted state efforts to clean the radioactive material and inform the public, because it cost too much money. The Utilities Authority conducted tapwater samples that measured high concentrations of radium coming out of fountains at an elementary school, regional airport, government offices, and the tourist welcome center, but the results of these samples were never made public.
  • Air Force Secretary Eyed for Top Army Job

    Tireless cultivation of sources helped these reporters uncover the name of the next Army secretary well before the more mainstream sources got the information. As soon as the information was confirmed the story was published.