Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "ESPN" ...

  • ESPN Outside the Lines/E:60: “Spartan Secrets”

    ESPN’s investigation of sexual assault and abuse claims involving young women and athletes broke through the oft-held defense that the problem was just one bad actor. Our original reporting on sexual abuse claims against former Michigan State and USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar, and how the university dealt with sex assault claims against student athletes, revealed systems that enabled abuse, and involved reports of widespread mishandling – and silencing – of women who said they suffered for years after reporting their assaults. The investigation went well beyond the actions of Nassar, and unveiled a widespread pattern of denial, inaction and information suppression. Michigan State in particular did not want this information out, but through requests for data, documents and a lengthy court battle, along with securing valuable sources, ESPN prevailed in getting much of what it had requested. At the height of the #MeToo movement, ESPN’s reporting gave a voice to the women who had been silenced, and exposed the failures of the people and institutions tasked with protecting them.
  • Spartan Secrets

    ESPN’s investigation of sexual assault and abuse claims involving young women and athletes broke through the oft-held defense that the problem was just one bad actor. Our original reporting on sexual abuse claims against former Michigan State and USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar, and how the university dealt with sex assault claims against student athletes, revealed systems that enabled abuse, and involved reports of widespread mishandling – and silencing – of women who said they suffered for years after reporting their assaults. The investigation went well beyond the actions of Nassar, and unveiled a widespread pattern of denial, inaction and information suppression. Michigan State in particular did not want this information out, but through requests for data, documents and a lengthy court battle, along with securing valuable sources, ESPN prevailed in getting much of what it had requested. At the height of the #MeToo movement, ESPN’s reporting gave a voice to the women who had been silenced, and exposed the failures of the people and institutions tasked with protecting them.
  • ESPN, Outside the Lines: "Sasha's Story" and "Victims of Inaction"

    Rare in sports journalism is the investigative story that not only unearths a major institutional failure, but prompts comprehensive policy and other changes that aim to help thousands if not millions of people around the nation. That is what happened as a result of ESPN’s 16-month investigation into the death of a University of Missouri swimmer who struggled with mental illness and the effects of a sexual assault – two of the largest issues facing college students today.
  • ESPN, Outside the Lines: “Pat Tillman: 10 Years Later an Enduring Tragedy"

    In the 10 years since the death of former NFL and Arizona State football player Pat Tillman in Afghanistan, none of the platoon mates who fired upon him had spoken publicly about the episode. In late 2013, ESPN’s Outside the Lines followed up its own original reporting on the fratricide, locating and contacting Tillman’s fellow Army Rangers who had acknowledged to investigators having fired upon his position. After multiple conversations with the Rangers over several months, one of the men who fired upon Tillman, Steven Elliott, agreed to break a decade of silence. That on-camera interview led to two April 2014 programs, the latest in OTL’s groundbreaking reporting about one of the most infamous friendly-fire deaths in U.S. military history.
  • Inside the Locker Room: Shooting Away the Pain

    An exclusive ABC News investigation in a partnership with ESPN discovered that tucked away in college training rooms, underneath the stadium, is a closely-held secret of team doctors using powerful prescription painkillers to get student athletes on the field, despite painful injuries, regardless of the price to their health. Painkiller shots given in college sports locker rooms, often called “The Magic Shot” by players, have long been rumored but kept hush-hush in the sporting world. The collaboration between the ABC News Brian Ross Investigative Team and ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” was a groundbreaking effort by major news organizations to document and expose the dangerous practice.
  • Professional sports and charities: A conundrum

    ESPN’s "Outside the Lines" investigated 115 charities founded by high-profile, top-earning male and female athletes and examined the nonprofit status of the PGA Tour and its tour stops that also operate as nonprofits.
  • The Match Maker: Bobby Riggs, The Mafia and The Battle of the Sexes

    For 40 years, rumors have swirled about one of the most iconic sporting events in American history, “The Battle of the Sexes.” While Billie Jean King's victory at the Houston Astrodome on Sept. 20, 1973 over Bobby Riggs was a seminal moment for gender equality, some people in tennis have wondered whether Riggs, the 55-year-old hustler and con man, purposely threw the match for a big pay day. For the first time, ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” examined whether the “Battle of the Sexes” was Riggs' greatest hustle.
  • NFL at a Crossroads: Investigating a health crisis

    Awareness of the football concussion crisis reached the mainstream in 2013, and ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” continued its now two-year investigation. In its crossplatform series of stories in 2013, “Outside the Lines” shed light on all aspects of the crisis, from the NFL’s years-long denials that playing football could lead to brain damage to how the crisis affects football at all levels to the behind-the-scenes happenings related to the settlement of a federal lawsuit more than 4,000 players had filed against the NFL.
  • Coach Misconduct at Rutgers

    After exclusively obtaining hundreds of hours of video of men's basketball practices at Rutgers University, ESPN's “Outside the Lines” ran a series of television and digital media reports that sparked a national conversation and had an almost immediate impact on the future of Rutgers athletics. On Tuesday, April 2, “Outside the Lines” reported across all platforms an initial report about how Rutgers men's head basketball coach Mike Rice for months had engaged in abusive behavior during practices -- hurling balls at players, kicking and shoving them and screaming obscenities, including homophobic slurs at them.
  • Outside the Lines: South Florida Bust

    An ESPN "Outside the Lines" story revealing gambling and corruption in South Florida youth football leads police to their own investigation and the arrest of nine men in connection with organized gambling.