Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "FEMA" ...

  • Puerto Rico After the Storms: Recovery and Fraud

    U.S. taxpayer are footing the biggest bill ever for a natural disaster, $91 billion, going to a government mired in corruption and under FBI investigation. We are the only news program that we know of to tackle and extensively report on how much has been promised and how little has actually been received in the wake of hurricanes Maria and Irma. We travelled to the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, learning there has been a great deal of misreporting and misunderstanding about these numbers, which were not easily accessible. To get at the true amounts, we obtained and examined federal and territory documents, pressed the governor’s office, and interviewed officials responsible for the aid including Puerto Rico’s top hurricane recovery official and FEMA’s top official in Puerto Rico. During our visit, there was a popular uprising against the government followed by the governor's resignation, and additional FBI arrests of U.S. and Puerto Rican officials and contractors.
  • Under Fire

    In a powerful segment for Dateline NBC, Katy Tur investigates allegations of sexual misconduct in the United States Forest Service and asks why, after decades of complaints and two congressional hearings, many female employees still feel like they are faced with a terrible dilemma – commit career suicide by reporting their experiences or stay silent and never see justice.
  • The Deerfield Scroll: Gender discrimination and sexual violence alleged at elite boarding school

    Two respected teachers - also husband and wife - left our school abruptly with little public explanation. I investigated their departure and learned that the female teacher had filed an explosive lawsuit against my school alleging a years-long pattern of sexual discrimination and of alleged sexual violence against female students. I was under tremendous pressure by some faculty members and others to drop the story but I was determined to get it published so that my school could confront the serious issues raised in the litigation.
  • CT Mirror: Inmate Health Care

    CT Mirror began looking into the multi-million contract to provide inmate health care after a female prisoner gave birth in her cell last year. It quickly became apparent the state was not providing adequate oversight of the care being provided to inmates at a time when state funding had been drastically reduced.
  • CNN Investigates - Uber Sexual Assault

    CNN Investigates’ multi-part, five month-long reporting project focused on allegations of sexual assaults by drivers of the rideshare giant Uber. Uber pitches itself in advertising as a “safe ride home,” but CNN’s reporting found that in case after case across the country, Uber drivers prey on female passengers, and Uber’s background check process allowed thousands of convicted criminals to become drivers. CNN’s investigation led to safety changes in the Uber app, a change in the background check policy, and a change in Uber’s policy that forced sexual assault victims into arbitration and compelled them to sign non-disclosure agreements.
  • CBS News: National Flood Insurance Mismanagement

    Our EXCLUSIVE six-month CBS News investigation uncovered serious fiscal mismanagement in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), administered by FEMA. Today, that program is 25 billion dollars in the red. We found that as storm victims struggle to rebuild, much of FEMA’s money that could pay homeowners claims actually goes to private insurance companies and legal fees to fight flood victims’ claims. Based on a review of thousands documents related to claims, lawsuits and FOIA requests, private government contractors are getting rich at the expense of desperate flood victims.
  • Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup

    In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. A riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley.
  • How the Park Service is Failing Women

    In January 2016, the Department of the Interior released a report revealing that female employees of the River District of the Grand Canyon had been sexually harassed for years, so High Country News staff decided to investigate further. After 11 months of reporting, dozens of tips from current and former employees within the National Park Service, we found that the sexual harassment and gender discrimination issues were far more systematic than the agency.
  • How the Park Service is Failing Women

    In January 2016, the Department of the Interior released a report revealing that female employees of the River District of the Grand Canyon had been sexually harassed for years, so High Country News staff decided to investigate further. After 11 months of reporting, dozens of tips from current and former employees within the National Park Service, we found that the sexual harassment and gender discrimination issues were far more systematic than the agency would admit.
  • Doctors & Sex Abuse

    Across the United States, sexual abuse of patients by doctors occurs far more often than has been known by the public or acknowledged by the medical profession, according to an investigation by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Regulators have a strong bias to forgive even doctors with egregious violations and return them to practice. The abuse is shrouded in secrecy and accountability is crippled by a poor framework of laws that does not put patient protection at the forefront. In a multi-part series that began July 7 and continues through the end of the year, The AJC revealed a broken culture that echoes scandals in the Catholic Church and Boy Scouts. Because of this broken culture, the medical profession is not addressing the victimization of patients, mostly female, by a powerful and esteemed group of men who, in any other walk of life, would likely lose their jobs and possibly be jailed. http://doctors.ajc.com/table_of_contents/ http://doctors.ajc.com/video_doctors_sex_abuse/ http://doctors.ajc.com/video_sex_abuse_story_details http://doctors.ajc.com/states/minnesota_sex_abuse/