Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "Ferguson" ...

  • Trump & Ukraine: Fact and Fiction

    The President’s men, the Vice President’s son and a single phone call: the real story of what happened in Ukraine and why it led to impeachment hearings. As the rumors and accusations surrounding President Trump’s involvement in Ukraine started to swirl, NBC’s Chief Foreign Correspondent Richard Engel travelled to Ukraine to talk to the key players on the ground to tell the story of why the Ukrainian prosecutor investigating Joe Biden’s son was really fired. Engel and his team in Ukraine secured the first broadcast interview with the man central to the story – the Ukrainian former Prosecutor Yuri Leshenko. He revealed that President Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani was applying pressure for an investigation to be reopened, in an apparent attempt to dig for dirt on a political rival. He told NBC exclusively that far from being a one-off conversation, the two had spoken “around ten times”. This information was picked up and widely reported by other media.
  • Policing in America: Five Years after Ferguson

    CBS News’ “Policing in America: Five Years After Ferguson” is a first-of-its-kind investigation into changes that police departments across America say they're making regarding race and policing since the shooting death of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and unrest in Ferguson, Missouri five years ago.
  • The Color of Debt

    The heart of our main story was a first-of-its-kind analysis of debt collection lawsuits. Crunching data from five years of court judgments from three metropolitan areas — St. Louis, Chicago and Newark — we found that, even controlling for income, the rate of judgments was twice as high in mostly black neighborhoods as it was in mostly white ones. This finding was drawn out through in-depth reporting on the ground in St. Louis. We focused on one neighborhood, Jennings, a mostly black suburb that borders Ferguson in north St. Louis County, to illustrate the impact.
  • Color of Debt

    The heart of our main story this year was a first-of-its-kind analysis of debt collection lawsuits. Crunching data from five years of court judgments from three metropolitan areas — St. Louis, Chicago and Newark — we found that, even controlling for income, the rate of judgments was twice as high in mostly black neighborhoods as it was in mostly white ones. This finding was drawn out through in-depth reporting on the ground in St. Louis. We focused on one neighborhood, Jennings, a mostly black suburb that borders Ferguson in north St. Louis County, to illustrate the impact. https://projects.propublica.org/garnishments/
  • ABC News Investigation Uncovers Hundreds of New Vehicles Across the U.S. Sold with Open Safety Recalls

    In this hidden-camera investigation, ABC News went undercover and bought a brand new truck with an open safety recall. ABC News also found that hundreds of vehicles from various automakers were sold illegally with open recalls at more than 100 dealerships across the United States. The story was broadcast on Good Morning America, World News Tonight and Nightline as well as ABC News digital.We are entering both the Nightline and GMA versions of the story. http://abcnewsvod.com.edgesuite.net/abcnews/2016/01/150319_gma_benitez_test_2500.mp4 http://abcnewsvod.com.edgesuite.net/abcnews/2015/03/150320_ntl_car_1252_2500.mp4
  • Silent Killer

    This ABC News investigation of cars with keyless ignition systems -- broadcast on Good morning America and Nightline -- examines the potential dangers car owners and their families face from carbon monoxide poisoning if they leave their car running in a closed attached garage. The report included ABC News’ own demonstration which illustrated just how easy it is to leave a keyless ignition car running. The team then left the car on, measuring carbon monoxide gas levels in the garage continually – lethal levels were reached in just over 4 hours.
  • Line of Fire: Bullets, badges and death on the street

    Even before riots swept Ferguson, Mo., WPTV NewsChannel 5 and The Palm Beach Post teamed up to take on an unprecedented assignment: Track every police-involved shooting since 2000. We spent more than one year gathering public records and creating a database to track every detail from 256 incidents. Our joint investigation found Palm Beach County’s largest law enforcement agency cleared deputies in nearly every shooting and showed a pattern of rushing to judgment and ignoring evidence to reach those conclusions.
  • The Injustice System: Cops, Courts and Greedy Politicians

    Our primary entry is an hour-long, commercial free documentary that exposes the role police, municipal courts and politicians play in a revenue-driven system of law enforcement in St. Louis County. KMOV’s investigation was sparked by issues revealed following the protests and riots in Ferguson, MO. News 4 Investigates repeatedly documented the abuses that are prompting major reforms in local police departments and courts. The documentary is part of a major ongoing investigation that includes more than 40 stories revealing misconduct, incompetence, racism and greed in policing and the courts. KMOV’s investigation prompted the Bellefontaine Neighbors police department to end its ticket quota system. It also forced the resignation of a judge, the termination of a police officer, and following our report on the Bellefontaine Neighbors PD, city officials met with representatives from the United States Department of Justice for a series of community meetings focusing on policing practices. Our stories were played during those meetings. KMOV’s reports were also played by state senators during sessions of the Missouri state legislature and cited as part of the evidence documenting the need for reform.
  • One Year Later: CNNMoney Investigates Ferguson

    After a scathing report from the Department of Justice finding rampant policing for profit in Ferguson, the city touted changes to the police department and court system, while lawmakers heralded a new state law aimed at limiting the use of court fines as revenue generators. But we didn’t want to take the city’s word for it, and in an exclusive analysis eventually discovered that even after the DOJ report, the city continued to issue thousands of warrants over the same kinds of minor offenses the DOJ had highlighted. We also found that the problem goes far beyond Ferguson. Policing for profit has raged on in Ferguson’s neighboring towns -- keeping many of the area’s low-income residents stuck in a cycle of court debt and jail stints. Like a pastor who was jailed countless times for minor traffic tickets, a 27-year-old who has spent more than a decade trying to pay off tickets she got as a teenager, or a young mom who was arrested over not having a residency sticker on her car.
  • The Changing Face of America

    Most data-driven discussions about race focus either on the national level (which masks local trends) or are centered on areas of conflict (such as Ferguson, Mo.) USA TODAY wanted to give people the tools that would allow them to explore how race end ethnicity have changed over time -- where they live and where they go to school. But how do you measure diversity when such trends wax and wane over time? Is a community that changed from nearly all-white to all-black as diverse as an area that received a high level of immigrants? Why do some communities barely notice big changes over time, while others become a nexus of violence? And how does the change in my community compare to anyone else's? To do that USA TODAY needed a tool to level the playing field, a way to show 100 years of change both locally and nationally, on the same scale. The series, based on the USA TODAY Diversity Index, is explanatory data at its best: quantifying incremental change that everyone sees anecdotally.