Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Gonzalez" ...

  • Unlivable: How Texas Fails Farmworkers

    A four-month investigation into the state of Texas’ inspection program for migrant farmworker housing revealed a broken system where regulators have never taken action against growers who house workers in substandard conditions and don't seek out illegally operating facilities.
  • The Numbers Game

    The Naked Truth: Numbers Game examines the inadequate and outdated collection of crime statistics and how this practice skews policing and public policy. Fusion’s Ryan Nerz uncovers the reality behind the numbers. They wrangled raw FBI data to develop key insights into policing in the U.S. Plus, they learned how gaming the numbers can lead to further inequality, discrimination, and in some cases, neglect. Stats may not be sexy, but this data affects how we live our lives every single day, especially if you are black in America. http://tv.fusion.net/story/373011/naked-truth-numbers-game/
  • Dirty Little Secrets: Inside the Panama Papers

    Under the mantle of its “Naked Truth” investigative documentary series, Fusion was chosen by the the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) as one of only two US English-language partners -- and the only one to produce a full-length video documentary -- for its investigation into the Panama Papers, a leak of more than 11.5 million documents from Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca.
  • Prison Kids: America’s Crime Against Children

    The Prison Kids documentary and 16 accompanying digital pieces offer an in-depth view of a system hidden from most Americans -- juvenile courts and prisons. The film and digital series offers a wide-reaching yet nuanced portrait of a dysfunctional system that regularly harms the kids it’s meant to help. http://fusion.net/series/prison-kids/
  • Dirty Little Secrets: New Jersey’s Poorest Live Surrounded by Contamination

    WNYC found 89 percent of New Jerseyans live within a mile of a contaminated site. Most of those sites are in the process of being cleaned up, which can take years. But our investigation found 1,464 of the state’s 14,066 known contaminated sites don’t have any clean-up plan in place. Many sites have sat orphaned and polluted for years, and they are disproportionately found in low-income communities. http://www.wnyc.org/story/nj-contaminated-sites/
  • APTN Investigates: Plastic Shamans

    Are there bizarre cults operating among the people of Haida Gwaii? This region is among the most beautiful in Canada. It is home to one of the most powerful and progressive First Nations in Canada. And yet the community is divided by the presence of outside "healers" who claim they are helping the people heal from the legacies of colonialism and residential school. But others claim, the healers are fraudsters. Laura Duthiel is among those who says she has been involved in not just one but two separate and distinct groups. There is Earth Peoples United, lead by leader Erik Gonzalez - a man who claims to be a Mayan healer. But Duthiel says he uses drugs and peer pressure to keep her under his control. The other is a group called Psychology of Vision, offering a so-called spiritual health model created by a couple from Hawaii. Duthiel says their controversial techniques don't work As a result of speaking out and sounding the alarm, she says she's been shunned by many members of her community Because some of the groups' supporters say they are genuinely helping people. But Duthiel also has defenders, band members who say the groups are doing more harm than good; that they are nothing more than plastic healers.
  • Force at the Border

    On Oct. 10, 2012, one or more Border Patrol agents shot an unarmed Mexican teenager 10 times in the back and head, firing through the border fence from Arizona into Nogales, Mexico. Agents said Jose Antonio Elena Rodriguez had thrown rocks at them. But their version of events didn’t square with the facts. As Arizona Republic reporters dug further into that killing and into 41 other cases of deadly force by on-duty Border Patrol agents, they found that agents who use deadly force face few if any public repercussions, even when the cases appear dubious. They found that agents who kill are protected by a culture of secrecy at Customs and Border Protection. The country’s largest law-enforcement body, CBP also is among the least transparent – in fact, its policies fly in the face of best practices recommended by national police organizations. The investigation found previously unreported deaths at the hands of agents. It found that hundreds of Border Patrol agents didn’t use deadly force, despite facing the same circumstances as the agents who killed. In addition, it examined why border deaths don't spark outrage and how the Border Patrol is increasingly backing up local police and conducting local police duties.
  • School Spanking

    StateImpact Florida reporter Sarah Gonzalez dug up school corporal punishment data from the Florida Department of Education and mapped reported instances of school spankings. This revealed corporal punishment was occurring only in Florida’s rural areas. She found 3,661 students were spanked in Florida schools in 2010, and that paddling does not deter students from misbehaving. Students who are paddled once are often re-paddled.
  • Waiting to React: Tennessee's child protection failures

    A lawmaker's concern about child deaths triggered a probing and ongoing Tennessean investigation into the failings and illegal practices of the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services. The newspaper detailed how the department broke the law by not reporting deaths to lawmakers; failed to keep accurate fatality statistics; allowed thousands of child abuse hotline calls to go unanswered; struggled to handle a spike in violence at youth detention centers; and adopted adversarial positions against child advocates, lawmakers, police and the agencies that oversee the department. Led by two reporters, the newspaper has exposed the department's $37 million computer installation debacle, shortcomings in how officials contract with private companies, and how a wave of abrupt senior-level firings made DCS one of the most volatile departments in Tennessee government. Through records requests, data analyses, close readings of reports and audits, and persistent questioning, The Tennessean penetrated the secretive $650 million department and provided a level of accountability just as the department has moved to dismantle other forms of oversight. The reporting prompted Gov. Bill Haslam to personally review DCS case files and forced the department to comply with fatality notification laws. An ongoing open records lawsuit led by The Tennessean and backed by the state's largest ever media coalition now seeks to force DCS to make child fatality records available to the media and the public for the first time.
  • No Choice: Florida Charter Schools Failing to Serve Students with Disabilities

    While Florida law says schools aren't allowed to turn kids away because it's too expensive to educate them, there is a loophole. The law says students with severe disabilities can only go to schools that provide the services they need. However, the investigation finds that most Florida charter schools do not offer those services.