Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Guantanamo" ...

  • Guantanamo’s Child – Omar Khadr

    Guantanamo has always been – and remains today – a story told through rhetoric and partisan politics. There is rarely a human face. There is rarely talk of the civil right violations in times of fear. Omar Khadr’s story is a dark chapter in both U.S. and Canadian history, and Guantanamo’s Child shines the light on these abuses for the first time. It is the story of a 15-year-old Canadian who grew up behind bars. It is his first – and only interview, where he talks about his recollections of the firefight, which kept him detained for 12 years. U.S. Special Forces soldiers also give their accounts of the firefight for the first time in exclusive interviews. The testimonies of former interrogators, detainees and military prosecutors reveal what Khadr endured while jailed. https://ajam.boxcn.net/s/zxe5pqfhioxyztdgyh6s4lmhhh08hy56
  • Power Wars: Inside Obama's Post-9/11 Presidency

    Power Wars is a comprehensive investigative history of national security legal policymaking during the Obama presidency. Based on interviews with more than 150 officials and access to numerous internal documents, it takes readers behind the scenes to explain why the administration governed as it did on surveillance, drone strikes, Guantanamo, interrogations, military commissions, secrecy, leak investigations, war powers, and executive power. Bringing large amounts of new information to light about internal deliberations and never-before-reported memos and events, it equips readers to grapple with the recurring accusation that Obama has acted like Bush and to understand the legacy of both presidencies. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316286575
  • ABC News Brian Ross Investigates: Taliban Living Large in Qatar?

    When Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was released from Taliban captivity this year, five Taliban senior Taliban leaders were released from Guantanamo and received a hero’s welcome in Qatar, an oil-rich desert oasis country with a spotty record for dealing with terrorism. Amid outrage over the release of these five Taliban members, once considered a high risk to the U.S., ABC News Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and Chief Investigative Producer Rhonda Schwartz travelled to the country’s capital of Doha to find out how the Taliban Five were really living.
  • Alex Quade's Taliban-5/Spec Ops Capture & Release

    In her exclusive, war reporter Alex Quade, reveals the original story behind the Special Operations Forces’ capture of one of the Taliban-5. Alex Quade persuaded the elite Operators to go on the record, assess the “high risk” detainee’s exchange for POW, Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl; and whether the released Taliban leader will attack U.S. interests again. One highly decorated Green Beret who originally helped capture him, is now a National Security Council counterterrorism head, who worked behind the scenes on the recent exchange. The senior Special Forces officer tells Alex of detainee Mullah Muhammad Fazl’s release from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; and assesses the government of Qatar’s ability to hold Fazl under the one year travel ban. Former Special Operations “Horse Soldiers” share details with Alex, you’ve never heard before. In Alex Quade’s exclusive, you’ll discover Mullah Fazl’s connection to: convicted “American Taliban” Johnny Walker Lindh; and CIA Agent Mike Spann, the first American killed in action in the war in Afghanistan. You’ll also learn of the released Taliban leader’s ties to former warlord, Gen. Abdul Rashid Dostum – now the Vice President of Afghanistan.
  • Abuse in G4S' prison exposed in South Africa

    Global security firm G4S runs a prison for profit in Bloemfontein, South Africa. I work for the Wits Justice Project, a collective of investigative journalists who research the criminal justice system. I visited the prison for the first time in September 2012 and talked to some of the inmates who had written to us. Their tales were worrying; they complained about the ‘Ninjas’; the Emergency Security Team (EST), a group of about eight armed men who are called to emergency situations. They are supposed to use minimum force, but according to the prisoners, they went completely overboard. They would take prisoners to the single cell unit, strip them naked, pour water over them and electroshock them with the electronically charged shields they carry with them. Also, the inmates told me how they would be injected forcibly with anti-psychotic drugs, while some of them did not suffer from any mental illness. In addition, they spoke to me about very lengthy isolation, some were placed in isolation cells for up to three years, I spoke to approximately 70 inmates and 25 warders over a period of a year, but these three sources were most crucial: The general. One of the inmates, a general in one of the infamous prison gangs, supplied with me dossiers and names of inmates who had been electroshocked, forcibly injected or placed in isolation for unlawful periods (up to 3 years). The deep throat. A government official who had worked at the prison was very concerned and had written a report in 2009 listing 62 inmates who had been placed in isolation up to 3 years, some of whom had been denied life saving TB and HIV medication. he also compared the prison to Guantanamo bay and mentioned excessive electroshocking The freedom fighter. A warder and informal labour union leader was very helpful in providing an entry with other warders and he leaked interesting information. An anonymous source eventually provided the smoking gun: video and audio footage of a forced injection and audio of electro shocking. I wrote three main stories about the prison and chose to publish in South Africa as well as in the UK, as G4S is head quartered there. I wrote pieces for the South African Citypress and the Mail and Guardian, simultaneously running a story in the British Guardian. When I finally broke the big story on the electroshocks and the forced injections, I also worked closely with the BBC and the South African investigative tv programme Carte Blanche, I provided them access to the results of my year-long research and they produced tv items that were broadcast at the same time as my stories ran in the newspapers. This in turn led to a worldwide coverage of the issue.
  • From Hopeful Immigrant to FBI Informant: The Inside Story of the Other Abu Zubaidah

    An investigative report detailing the FBI's harsh treatment of Hesham Mohamed Hussain Abu Zubaidah, the younger brother of Guantanamo detainee "Abu Zubaidah."
  • Unmasking Terrorism

    The ground-breaking coverage of three reporters gave readers an in-depth look inside U.S. torture cells overseas.
  • "Cruel and Unusual: The Culture of Punishment in America"

    In this book, author Anne-Marie Cusac reveals how America has become a nation of victims searching for revenge, rather that a "community that cares for its own." The cultural shift has impacted the criminal justice system, causing even "law-abiding" citizens at risk of "suffering retribution in American jails." The book illustrates how cultural trends have "transformed" America into a "society of punishment."
  • Guantanamo: Beyond the Law

    After the release of many detainees at the prison in Guantanamo Bay, reporters at McClatchy set out to track down as many freed prisoners as possible to see what had become of them. Who were the men imprisoned in this facility? Why were they detained? How had they been treated? This series explores these questions and found out a majority of the prisoners were there based on faulty evidence or testimony. They were not even involved in the terrorist attacks.
  • The War on Terror: Rorschach and Awe

    The story revealed, for the first time, two psychologists who were "the architects and teachers of the coercive interrogation methods first used at the CIA's black sites, which then spread to Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib.”