Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Hispanic" ...

  • Silent Majority/Mayoria Silenciosa

    A first-of-its-kind analysis found deep patterns of under-representation of the fast growing Hispanic population on city councils and county commissioners courts across Texas. http://projects.statesman.com/news/latino-representation/
  • Analyzing police use-of-force data

    After a yearlong open records battle, the San Antonio Express-News obtained and analyzed a use-of-force database from the San Antonio Police Department. The records showed that officers used force against black and Hispanic suspects at a rate that was up to 78 percent higher than white suspects, yet less than one percent of 5,300 force incidents resulted in any kind of policy violation. The newspaper brought those stunning numbers to life with police suspension records, video, DocumentCloud and interviews with victims -- including an innocent man who was paralyzed after he underwent surgery to treat injuries from a police beating.
  • Police & Race Relations

    This story delves into police and racial profiling in Amarillo. ABC 7 analyzed all traffic stops from 2015 that resulted in a warning or citation by race. We found that blacks had 10 percent of the traffic stops but made up seven percent of the Amarillo population. Hispanics had 40 percent of the traffic stops but make up 29 percent of the population. This story also looks at why the data might not tell the full story. People self-select their race on their driver’s license and the Census, but officers select a driver’s race during a traffic stop. There is also an issue in data collection because “Hispanic” didn’t become a race option for driver’s licenses until 2013. Previously, Hispanics had to select to be Black or White. Because not all licenses are updated but police must report the number of Hispanic drivers stopped each year, officers have to determine a driver’s race.
  • How Much Does Your Vote Count

    Using census data and swing state forecasts, this story explores how the electoral college and differences in turnout affect the voting power of Americans of different ages, genders, and races. It includes an interactive tool that lets readers explore the data and calculate their personal voting power score. We found that because many of them live in relatively “safe” states, the power of Black, Hispanic and Asian-American voters to choose the president was lower than that of white voters.
  • Racial Profiling Whitewash

    This KXAN investigation uncovered state and local law enforcement agencies wrongly reporting the race of minority drivers during traffic stops. KXAN analyzed more than 16 million Texas Department of Public Safety traffic stop records and revealed the state law enforcement agency systematically under-reported the number of minorities, mostly Hispanics, stopped on Texas roads by state troopers. The investigation questioned the validity of DPS racial profiling reports and led to immediate statewide changes in the way Texas troopers conduct traffic stops and record racial profiling data. KXAN found the same problem in the Austin Police Department which prompted an immediate audit of APD's traffic stop data and race recording practices which found APD in violation of the Texas racial profiling law. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kEG0q7WR1U
  • Broken Windows

    “Beyond Broken”: The number of summonses issued each year has soared since broken windows was implemented in the early 1990s — from 160,000 in 1993 to a peak of 648,638 in 2005 — making ticket writing for low-level offenses the single most frequent activity of NYPD officers, far surpassing felony and misdemeanor arrests combined. Roughly 81% of the 7.3 million people hit with summonses between 2001 and 2013 were black and Hispanic. And the top 15 precincts with the highest rate of summonses have a population that is 75% or more black and Hispanic. They spoke to nearly 170 people waiting in line at the city’s three summons courts. Although some admitted guilt, many said they felt targeted by officers looking to write tickets, as if their neighborhood were under “martial law.”
  • In precincts with higher minority populations, greater chance of casting provisional ballots

    This story presents an analysis of the percentage of provisional ballots cast in precincts across Maricopa County, Arizona during the November 2012 general election. Maricopa County is home to Sheriff Joe Arpaio, and home to several Hispanic rights groups. After the general election in November, some of the groups claimed Hispanics and other minorities were forced to vote provisionally more often than other groups, increasing the likelihood that their votes wouldn't count. This story confirmed that areas with higher rates of minorities did see higher rates of provisional ballots cast.
  • Meet The Candidates

    When the Commission on Presidential Debates did not choose an Hispanic or African-American moderator for the presidential debates, Univision ramped up its yearlong effort to provide Hispanic voters a direct opportunity to know the presidential candidates and help them make informed choices on election day. As the Spanish-language network of record, catering to a growing and influential part of the electorate, we invited the candidates to speak with us directly about issues of import to all voters as well as issues of specific concern to Hispanics. The result was an in-depth conversation that became one of the most talked about events of the campaign season.
  • Ticket Inequality

    After racial-profiling allegations in one town led to state and federal investigations of the local police department, we set out to investigate whether minority motorists faced similar discrimination elsewhere in the state. In a first-ever analysis of traffic-stop data recorded by local police departments, we found that black and Hispanic motorists pulled over by police were significantly more likely to be ticketed than white motorists pulled over the same offense.
  • "FBI Data, Scholars: As Illegal Immigration Rose, Crime Rate Fell"

    According to "widely trusted" crime reporting data, reports that crime is rising along the southern border of the U.S. in incorrect. Reporter Cristina Rayas wanted to find out if there was a correlation between crime and immigration. She found that the crime rate is actually down in the U.S. and that immigrants might actually be making "communities safer."