Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Iowa" ...

  • Tangled up in debt

    In late 2017, The Hechinger Report began a deep dive into cosmetology education in Iowa, an education marketplace that has long eluded scrutiny and whose graduates comprise a poorly paid and “invisible” workforce. For-profit beauty schools have maintained a near-monopoly on the sector and kept state regulations to their liking, and where, despite the schools’ hefty price tags, student earnings years after graduation often remain low. The story was a collaboration with The New York Times.
  • IRW: The Boy on the Bus

    The Investigative Reporting Workshop found deep cracks in the registry system for sex offenders that allow predators to move, skip registration, and begin new lives under the radar in a new neighborhood — unless they are arrested again. The story was published with IowaWatch.
  • Daily Iowegian: Indian Hills Community College

    The Indian Hills Community College baseball team in Iowa ousted two of its coaches — one of them a hall of fame coach — in May. After a more than four-month investigation, the Daily Iowegian found the coaches were removed after an internal investigation that coaches forced players to work for security companies at NFL and Big 10 games in Minneapolis and Iowa City, all while assigning fake names to foreign-born students so they could work around federal immigration law. The money went to the baseball program, not the players.
  • Indian Hills Community College

    The Indian Hills Community College baseball team in Iowa ousted two of its coaches — one of them a hall of fame coach — in May. After a more than four-month investigation, the Daily Iowegian found the coaches were removed after an internal investigation that coaches forced players to work for security companies at NFL and Big 10 games in Minneapolis and Iowa City, all while assigning fake names to foreign-born students so they could work around federal immigration law. The money went to the baseball program, not the players.
  • Nu-World Foods Investigation

    CBS 2's investigation into Nu-World Foods.
  • Tragedy on the Water

    A 20-year-old Iowa man died on May 31, 2014, while in the custody of a Missouri Highway Patrol trooper on the Lake of the Ozarks. Brandon Ellingson, stopped for suspicion of boating while intoxicated, was being transported to a patrol zone office when he fell – or, as the patrol initially said, jumped – from the trooper’s boat. His wrists were locked in handcuffs behind his back, and the life vest the trooper had placed over his head soon came off. Ellingson struggled to keep his head above water for several minutes before slipping to the bottom of the lake. Subsequent reporting revealed a series of mistakes by the trooper, a road veteran who had not received proper training to work the water after the Missouri Water Patrol was merged into the Highway Patrol in 2011.
  • farm Injuries

    We all need to eat. Our lives depend upon it. Yet, each day hundreds of thousands of farmers put their own lives at risk for our sustenance. One slip and their lives can be changed forever - or worse. The Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism and The Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting took a collaborative look at farm injuries in the top two corn-producing states in the country.
  • Emergency text alert system inconsistent across college campuses

    In the wake of violence across college campuses in recent years, the wide range of percentages of college students who receive emergency notifications via text message reflect the inconsistent and patchwork emergency notification systems that U.S. universities and colleges use. In addition, universities vary on how they keep track of who and how many receive these alerts. But a review of university procedures at about two-dozen universities by Midwest student reporters revealed that universities automatically send out emergency notifications to school email addresses, but often allow students to opt-in for text messages. In fact, many schools do not require students to register for and receive text messages.
  • EMS in Iowa

    The stories detailed Iowa's broken EMS system, and included detailed findings on violent criminals working as EMTs, the lack of state oversight, the shortage of volunteers, and the laws that require the state to keep secret the response times of ambulance services.
  • Iowa Juvenile Home

    The stories initially examined the illegal use of physical restraints and long-term isolation cells at the Iowa Juvenile Home, an unlicensed and largely unregulated state-run facility that provides housing, schooling and treatment for children with serious behavioral problems. The Register discovered that state workers were routinely confining children as young as 13 to unfurnished, 10-foot-by-12-foot concrete-block isolation cells in the basement of the home’s schoolhouse. One girl spent almost a full year in one such cell. Court records showed the home had been using long-term isolation, sometimes in direct violation of a judge’s order, for at least 17 years. Former residents of the home, and their legal advocates, agreed to speak to the Register on the record, and on video, about the isolation cells and the manner in which they were used. Over the next five months,the Register published a string of exclusives that uncovered other abuses and failings within the home, leading to the governor's decision in December to close the 50-year-old facility.