Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "KMGH-TV" ...

  • Unlicensed, Unpunished

    A single tip led the investigative team at Denver7 to uncover unlicensed, untrained and often unpunished health care workers diagnosing and treating vulnerable, sick and disadvantaged Coloradans. The team’s work led to criminal investigations, forced Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to intervene in the matter directly, and prompted state regulators to rewrite and reprioritize their policies. It represents a textbook case of journalists holding the powerful accountable by identifying fundamental problems in the institutions designed to keep consumers safe. Hickenlooper credited Denver7 for "actually making the community safer."
  • Colorado Rape Victims: Evidence Ignored, Justice Denied

    An 18-month ongoing investigation by KMGH-TV uncovered systemic failures in the handling of rape cases in Colorado -- from minimal police investigations, to prosecutors only accepting the most clear-cut cases, we found sexual assault victims rarely receive justice and their attackers are rarely held accountable. The investigation led to a new law which requires all rape kits -- both from old cases and new cases -- to be tested, and has led to a greater public awareness of how sexual assault cases are handled in Colorado.
  • "Adams County: Exposing a Culture of Corruption"

    This KMGH-TV investigation that began with uncovering of millions of dollars in no-bid contracts in exchange for gifts and free construction and landscape work at the homes of top county officials, has resulted in the convictions of those officials and the owner and employees of a county subcontractor for cheating taxpayers out of millions of dollars. The investigation spanned five years and prompted a fundamental change in county government and reforms in policies, procedures, and the county charter through voter referendum to insure transparency and best practice. We believe this long term investigation represents the important role journalists play in representing the citizenry, holding government accountable through in-depth reporting, and prompting significant structural change for the long term benefit of the community.
  • Investigating The Fire

    After three people were killed in a fire set by the Colorado State Forest Service, KMGH-TV uncovered governmental mistakes and communication failures that killed people and destroyed homes. Our coverage spurred legislative change that will ultimately help the victims of the Lower North Fork Fire (LNFF) rebuild their lives and protect future fire victims. The LNFF was started in March 2012 by a state forest service prescribed burn that went out of control, killing three people and destroying more than 20 homes. KMGH-TV's six-week investigation uncovered multiple government failures that turned a supposedly controlled burn into an uncontrolled wildfire. Despite heading into a busy ratings period, KMGH-TV dedicated two reporters -- Amanda Kost and Marshall Zelinger -- full-time to investigate the fire. The station produced more than two dozen investigative reports over 40 days. On top of the daily reports, KMGH-TV produced a 30-minute special of original content in six days. Our investigations sparked a legislative inquiry into the fire and prompted Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper to sign a law lifting liability limits that protected the state agency responsible for the blaze. Lawmakers, fire victims and community residents all agreed that without KMGH-TV's extensive investigation of government failures and mistakes, the families of people who died and people who lost homes would never be adequately compensated for their losses. Our investigation forced the state to reevaluate how it sets future prescribed burns to make sure the fires are safer for the community.
  • A Threat Ignored: The Aurora Theater Shooting Investigation

    As police were cordoning off the crime scene, the KMGH-TV investigative team immediately focused on the shooter and how he was able to carry out his deadly mission. Within a few hours, Investigative Reporter John Ferrugia was on the air reporting specific and exclusive details of how 24-year old James Holmes had gained access to the theater and carried out his deadly mission. In subsequent weeks, KMGH-TV team uncovered information showing that the University of Colorado Threat Assessment team had known about Holmes' mental health issues and his potential for harming others. In multiple exclusive reports Ferrugia detailed how Holmes psychiatrist had contacted not only the University "BETA Team", but University police with concerns that Holmes could be a threat because he had told her about his fantasies of "killing a lot of people". These stories made national headlines with the stories attributed the KMGH-TV.
  • Investigating the Fire

    After three people were killed in a fire set by the Colorado State Forest Service, KMGH-TV uncovered governmental mistakes and communication failures that killed people and destroyed homes. Our coverage spurred legislative change that will ultimately help the victims of the Lower North Fork Fire (LNFF) rebuild their lives and protect future fire victims. The LNFF was started in March 2012 by a state forest service prescribed burn that went out of control, killing three people and destroying more than 20 homes. KMGH-TV's six-week investigation uncovered multiple government failures that turned a supposedly controlled burn into an uncontrolled wildfire. Despite heading into a busy ratings period, KMGH-TV dedicated two reporters -- Amanda Kost and Marshall Zelinger -- full-time to investigate the fire. The station produced more than two dozen investigative reports over 40 days. On top of the daily reports, KMGH-TV produced a 30-minute special of original content in six days. Our investigations sparked a legislative inquiry into the fire and prompted Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper to sign a law lifting liability limits that protected the state agency responsible for the blaze. Lawmakers, fire victims and community residents all agreed that without KMGH-TV's extensive investigation of government failures and mistakes, the families of people who died and people who lost homes would never be adequately compensated for their losses. Our investigation forced the state to reevaluate how it sets future prescribed burns to make sure the fires are safer for the community.
  • The Fight for Public Records: Pinnacol v. KMGH-TV

    The story documents the seven month legal battle launched by a quasi-state agency against KMGH-TV. This came after the television station planned to disclose records indicating board members within the agency were given all-expense paid trips to the California coast.
  • "33 Minutes to 34 Right"

    When Continental Flight 1404 crashed during its landing at the Denver International Airport, it took ambulance responses teams 33 minutes to reach the crash site. KMGH-TV's investigation reveals critical problems with Denver's ambulance system and dispatch center, as well as with the city's overall preparedness for emergency response.
  • Failing the Children: Deadly Mistakes

    "In May 2007, authorities found 7-year old Chandler Grafner starved to death in a closet. He showed signs of long-term abuse. His guardians, Jon Phillips and Sarah Berry, were convicted of murder. In covering the story, KMGH-TV investigative reporter John Ferrugia attempted to determine the extent of the the Denver Department of Human Services' involvement with the family... Ferrugia and the KMGH investigative team consistently obtained internal documents to expose a system fraught with incompetence, lack of oversight, poor management and ineffective training... In short, a system that left children at risk."
  • Protecting the Doctors

    KMGH-TV found that when Colorado doctors are accused of sexual assault and/or improper conduct investigations are handled by the Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies. The administrative investigation reports all criminal acts and findings to the state's attorney general who represents the agency. Because the A.G. represents the agency, it has no obligation under the law to notify or counsel the victim. The result is many doctors simply surrender their license and then are free because no charges are pressed before statute of limitations runs out. Doctors are then able to file for a reinstatement of medical license anywhere, because files are sealed. After this report legislation was passed to close this loop hole.