Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Marine" ...

  • Into the Raging Sea: Thirty-Three Mariners, One Megastorm, and the Sinking of El Faro

    "A pulse-pounding Perfect Storm-style tale" (Kirkus, starred review) of the sinking of the American container ship El Faro, the crew of 33 who perished onboard, and the destructive forces of globalization that put the ship in harm’s way.
  • Aging aircraft and hidden threats

    While the Navy spent big over the past 20 years on experimental mine hunting technology that may never work, it stopped investing in its mine-hunting Sea Dragon helicopters, which have spent the better part of a year grounded due to mechanical problems after a series of deadly accidents. Now the service is trying to play catch-up. The Sea Dragon’s troubles are a symptom of a much larger problem: America’s military aircraft have been flown hard during 15 years of combat in the Middle East, and nearly all of their next-generation replacements are years behind schedule and millions over budget. The result: Much of the nation’s fleet is flying far longer than planned and in need of critical maintenance to keep them going. Their investigation found that the United State's Marine and Navy aircraft fleet has dismal readiness rates, as evidenced in an internal report obtained by the IRP and Virginian-Pilot. They examine what effect this has on our military's ability to counter the threat of sea mines.
  • Fatal Experiments

    Paolo Macchiarini has long been hailed as both a superstar surgeon and a revolutionizing researcher in the world of regenerative medicine. When he performed the world's first transplantation of a synthetic trachea seeded with stem cells in 2011, it seemed that modern medicine was one step closer to "the artificial man," where human organs could be produced in laboratories. But when the patients soon started dying, serious allegations of research fraud started to emerge against Macchiarini and his methods. At the same time, his operations were investigated by the police for suspected manslaughter. But Macchiarini was backed by the prestigious Karolinska Institute (home of the Nobel prize), which found that all in all he had done nothing wrong. Paolo seemed to be free of the accusations, that is until he let a team of investigative reporters into his world of the academic elite.
  • A Marine’s Convictions

    A Marine fights to prove he’s innocent of sexual misconduct. Then a lost cellphone is found.
  • The Gatekeeper to Tampa’s Political Machine

    A multi-platform investigation exposing how Tampa Bay’s top politicians empowered a political consultant to act as “gatekeeper” to city hall and prioritized their personal interests above the taxpayers’. Using public records as a roadmap, WTSP prompted widespread changes that improved tracnsparency and accountability in Tampa Bay.
  • Candy Land: The Tomah VA

    The Department of Veterans Affairs hospital in Tomah, Wisconsin, was known as “Candy Land” by patients and staff members alike. Its chief of staff had earned the nickname “Candy Man” for liberally prescribing a powerful drug cocktail to veterans struggling with mental and physical pain. But Washington paid no attention until reporter Aaron Glantz sounded the alarm. Among his story’s more shocking revelations: Patients arrived for appointments so stoned that they nodded off during therapy sessions, and a 35-year-old Marine Corps veteran fatally overdosed on drugs prescribed to him inside the hospital’s psychiatric ward.
  • The Tender Soldier: A True Story of War and Sacrifice

    "The Tender Soldier" is the first deeply reported narrative nonfiction account of the Human Terrain System, a controversial, experimental Army program that embeds civilian social scientists, including anthropologists, psychologists and sociologists, with front line combat units to provide cultural knowledge and intelligence to soldiers and marines. The program was developed in the early years of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and launched its first field team in Khost, Afghanistan in 2007.
  • PSTA-Driving Outside the Lines

    An Investigation into the Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority showing it knowingly created an illegal plan to use a $354,000 Homeland Security Grant to promote a tax increase. As we got deeper into looking at the agency we found maintenance problems the agency tried to cover up and lie about and drivers on the road who should not have been behind the wheel
  • The CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley: Bringing Home America’s Fallen Correspondent: Chip Rei

    Four-story series on waste and mismanagement within the Pentagon agencies responsible for bringing home the remains of 83,000 US military personnel who never returned from battle. Despite a budget of more than $100 million, the series revealed the POW/MIA Accounting Community, as it is officially known, has a very poor record of repatriating and identifying remains. In fact, the Pentagon’s results were eclipsed by those of a non-profit charity whose work we carefully documented. Two days after our first story ran, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered a thorough review of the sprawling Pentagon bureaucracy. The CBS reporters followed up with another story when Hagel ordered a massive reorganization. The story included interviews with family members who endured years of agony while they pleaded for answers from the Pentagon. CBS also reported on a highly critical DoD Inspector General’s report months before it was officially released. The fourth story in the series tracked the work of History Flight, a charity that has successfully recovered WWII remains on the Pacific Island of Tarawa. CBS reporters traveled to Tarawa with six US Marines, now in their 90s, on their first return visit since they fought there in 1943. The series documented the emotional scene as they witnessed History Flight’s painstaking recovery of their fellow Marines. http://vimeo.com/cbseveningnews/review/115438489/56d862cc1e
  • Safe from War | Dead at Home

    This three-day series was the culmination of a yearlong project that took an unprecedented look at the untimely deaths of Marines in Southern California’s High Desert. We set out to produce something revelatory, and ultimately discovered trends that have never been reported before, and were likely unknown even to the military itself. Our series discovered that the rural Marine base in Twentynine Palms, CA suffered more non-combat deaths on American soil than war casualties between 2007 and 2012. Our reporting revealed that the base had an extremely high rate of off-duty car crashes, which was worsened by a culture of heavy drinking and a reckless, “invincible” mindset held by many Marines. The series also showed that Marines who took their own life at the Twentynine Palms base were twice as likely to be under the influence of alcohol as the average Marine suicide.