Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Metropolitan" ...

  • WUSA 9 -- "DC Police: Stop and Frisk"

    Through analyzing more than 6 years of data WUSA 9's “DC Police: Stop and Frisk” series uncovered 8 out of 10 people stop and frisked by Washington, DC police are African-American, despite black people making up less than half the city's population. The year-long investigation, 20 part series and hour-long special that followed exposed shocking and systematic failures by the Washington, DC Metropolitan Police Department to follow its own laws. Laws designed to protect people from racial bias on the part of police officers.
  • The Color of Debt

    The heart of our main story was a first-of-its-kind analysis of debt collection lawsuits. Crunching data from five years of court judgments from three metropolitan areas — St. Louis, Chicago and Newark — we found that, even controlling for income, the rate of judgments was twice as high in mostly black neighborhoods as it was in mostly white ones. This finding was drawn out through in-depth reporting on the ground in St. Louis. We focused on one neighborhood, Jennings, a mostly black suburb that borders Ferguson in north St. Louis County, to illustrate the impact.
  • King County Metro’s Bathroom Reform: Constipated or Incompetent?

    Following a six-month state investigation that concluded King County Metropolitan Transit was not providing bathrooms bus drivers could reach during their breaks, the transit agency made several promises. They included cleaning a troublesome portable at the end of the No. 36 -- its busiest route -- three times weekly, creating a new email address and phone line for operators to report problems, and assigning a staff member to respond to operators’ complaints. Metro broke all of those promises. As a result, a new portable at the end of that No. 36 line overflowed with human waste, making it unusable for more than two weeks.
  • Metro buses: Pedestrians in a blind spot?

    King County Metropolitan Transit District bus collisions with pedestrians grew substantially after schedules were tightened and drivers had less time to recover between trips. Collisions with walkers leaped 35 percent in the past four-plus years. And a group of accidents was disturbingly similar: A Metro bus manufactured by Orion turning left hit a pedestrian in a crosswalk. That model bus has a large pillar on the left-hand side of the windshield, making it difficult for the driver to see walkers while turning.
  • Border Patrol Sex Assaults

    CBS News investigation revealed “disturbing” sex abuse within the country’s largest law enforcement agency US Customs and Border Protection. A former top official of the agency told us for the first time that he notified his superiors of a “spike” in sexual misconduct by agents that was significantly higher than any other federal law enforcement agency as well as other large metropolitan police departments. As a result of our story – the DHS integrity council met with our whistleblower and then issued a series of recommended changes to CBP.
  • Color of Debt

    The heart of our main story this year was a first-of-its-kind analysis of debt collection lawsuits. Crunching data from five years of court judgments from three metropolitan areas — St. Louis, Chicago and Newark — we found that, even controlling for income, the rate of judgments was twice as high in mostly black neighborhoods as it was in mostly white ones. This finding was drawn out through in-depth reporting on the ground in St. Louis. We focused on one neighborhood, Jennings, a mostly black suburb that borders Ferguson in north St. Louis County, to illustrate the impact. https://projects.propublica.org/garnishments/
  • Dividing Lines

    This project explored the nature, causes and consequences of political polarization in metropolitan Milwaukee and Wisconsin. It concluded that metropolitan Milwaukee is by some measures the most polarized place in swing-state America; that it has grown more politically segregated with virtually every election cycle since the 1970s; that its voters live overwhelmingly in politically homogenous neighborhoods dominated by a single party; that those communities have been moving systematically in one partisan direction (either red or blue) for more than four decades; that the partisan gap between its urban and outlying communities has been steadily growing; and that this deep and deepening polarization is a consequence of at least three factors: extreme racial segregation, unusually high levels of political engagement and activism; and at least two decades of perpetual partisan conflict and mobilizing as a result of Wisconsin’s political competitiveness, its battleground role in presidential races and the unprecedented turmoil and division over collective bargaining beginning in 2011. We also charted the rise of political segregation nationally, in the ever-growing share of voters in the United States who live in politically one-sided counties. The project also traced the dramatic changes in voting behavior in the state of Wisconsin in recent decades with the demise of ticket-splitting, the rise of extreme party-line voting, and the systematic growth of two political divides – the one between white and nonwhite voters, and the one between densely populated and less densely populated places. The series explored the relationship between Wisconsin’s high and rising political engagement and turnout rates and its deepening partisan divisions. And it explored the consequences of rising polarization and political segregation when it comes to the way campaigns are conducted, the outcomes of elections, the decline in electoral competition, and barriers to regional problem-solving. It found that as a result of partisan and geographic fault lines, the two parties in Wisconsin (and elsewhere) are increasingly drawing their support from different kinds of voters and different kinds of communities, and winning very different kinds of elections.
  • Poor Health An occasional series about the barriers to health and health care for low-income urban Americans

    Poor Health was the result of a collaboration between the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and faculty and students from Marquette University. Both papers published the series, which had three major parts. The backbone of the series is a set of interactive maps that shows that health care systems have closed hospitals in poor communities in the major U.S. metropolitan areas while opening new facilities in more affluent areas, often communities that already had hospitals; that the residents of the communities in which hospitals closed were less healthy than their more affluent counterparts, and that communities in which hospitals closed were much more likely to be federally designated "physician shortage areas." than communities that retained or gained hospitals. In addition, reporting in several cities shows the health care challenges among the urban poor, the results of those difficulties and the economics that drive the unequal distribution of health care. The final part of the series focuses on solutions. A major story on the effort in Oregon to improve health care for Medicaid recipients while lowering costs is the centerpiece; other reporting on innovative approaches to health care in poor areas includes programs in Philadelphia, Cleveland and Indianapolis.
  • UK Parliamenary Paedophiles

    This entry consists of a series of feature articles published in the daily Morning Star, UK and on-line version. They form a campaign to reveal the extent of an official Establishment cover-up of the activities of UK Parliamentary MP's involved in widespread pedophile abuse of vulnerable children. The allegations and supporting evidence stretches back decades and includes actions taken by UK Secret Intelligence Services, The Metropolitan Police, and other regional forces, the Home Office and other state institutions. The campaign tracks individual cases and high profile government Ministers of State many of whom are now deceased. Children were taken from children's homes where they were being looked after by social services staff and transported to hotels and guest houses where they were drugged and sexually abused, orally and anally raped and forced to perform sexual acts on older men.
  • Money Where Your Mouth Is - Portland's Fluoride Fight

    It would be May of 2013 when Portland residents were asked to decide an issue most major metropolitan areas had decided back in the ‘50s – should we add fluoride to the city’s drinking water supply? Determined to go beyond campaign sound bites, KATU Consumer Investigator Shellie Bailey-Shah sought to uncover scientific proof - either supporting or disputing the argument that fluoridated water would lead to fewer cavities in children. Crunching the state of Oregon’s raw data in more logical ways than the state itself had ever considered, Bailey-Shah provided voters with hyper-local evidence that fluoride would not, in fact, improve their children’s dental health. Moreover, Bailey-Shah revealed how the state – a strong political and financial supporter of the community fluoridation campaign – stonewalled efforts to bring these new revelations to light.