Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Miami" ...

  • Bribery Division

    The Bribery Division, an international investigation into Latin America’s largest construction company, reveals fresh evidence of hundreds of millions of dollars in suspicious payments linked to major infrastructure projects. Brazilian multinational Odebrecht has been implicated in a cash-for-contracts scandal that the U.S. Department of Justice has described as “the largest foreign bribery case in history.” The Bribery Division investigation unveils dramatic new information in taking readers inside the belly of the beast: Odebrecht’s Division of Structured Operations, a specialized unit created for the primary purpose of managing the company’s graft. A team of more than 50 journalists across the Americas, led by ICIJ, examined more than 13,000 Odebrecht documents from a secret communication platform used by the Structured Operations unit. The team’s sprawling expose revealed Odebrecht’s cash-for-contracts operation was even bigger than the company had acknowledged to prosecutors and had involved prominent figures and massive public works projects not mentioned in the criminal cases or other official inquiries to date.
  • Miami Herald: FIU Bridge

    On March 15, an under-construction, 174-foot-long concrete pedestrian bridge collapsed on a busy road next to Florida International University's campus. Five people who by a cruel twist of fate happened to be driving under the bridge were instantly crushed to death. In addition, a worker standing on top of the structure, a joint project managed by both FIU and the state of Florida, was killed in the collapse. Several more people were injured. Herald reporters immediately rushed to the scene to report on the stunning accident. Following the initial coverage, a team of reporters worked for the rest of the year -- fighting for public records all the way -- to uncover why the bridge had fallen, who had oversight of the taxpayer-funded project, why the road below it remained open during crucial structural work and the impact on the families of the dead.
  • Dirty Gold, Clean Cash

    "Dirty Gold, Clean Cash" was an extensive Miami Herald investigation sparked by a federal court case into how organized crime groups, including narco-traffickers, are using destructive illegal gold mines in Latin America to launder money through precious metals -- metals which ultimately end up in the hands of unsuspecting American consumers as jewelry, electronics and bullion. The trade has a crucial logistical hub in Miami. The series required extensive on-the-ground reporting in Peru and Colombia, a challenge for a local paper like the Miami Herald but one which the paper was prepared for because of its longstanding commitment to foreign reporting.
  • Bulletproof

    Florida's post-Parkland "Red Flag" law has taken guns from dozens of dangerous people.
  • Perversion of Justice: How a future Trump Cabinet member gave a serial sex abuser the deal of a lifetime

    Miami Herald investigative reporter Julie K. Brown and visual journalist Emily Michot documented how a politically connected mulitmillionaire manipulated the criminal justice system to avoid significant punishment for his obsessive pursuit of sexual encounters with underage girls. Through behind-the-scenes emails, the journalists also demonstrated the remarkably cozy relationship between defendant Jeffrey Epstein's powerhouse legal team and state and federal prosecutors, including U.S. Attorney Alexander Acosta, who is now President Trump's labor secretary. And, in a first, they tracked down and interviewed several of Epstein's victims.
  • License to Launder: Cash, cops and cartels: A Miami Herald investigation

    The Miami Herald's License to Launder exposed an undercover police task force that turned a sting operation into an unchecked cash machine for police and their informants, laundering $71.5 million for drug cartels -- reaping millions in profits for brokering the deals -- then returned the rest to the same criminal groups without making a single arrest.
  • Higher-Ed Hustle

    Miami Herald reporter Michael Vasquez took a deep look at the private for-profit college industry in Florida to determine why it has flourished while similar schools have struggled in other states. What he found: Florida politicians -- especially those in the state legislature -- have enabled the industry, passing more than a dozen laws that fueled its growth while hindering community colleges. In exchange, lawmakers have received hundreds of thousands in campaign contributions.
  • Shortcut to the American Dream

    The longstanding yet little known EB-5 visa program allows wealthy foreigners to jump to the head of the immigration line, pumping capital into real estate from Seattle to Miami, but a Herald-Tribune investigation found the program is rife with fraud and that the government has no firm handle on who's getting in – raising questions of national security.
  • See No Evil: A Miami Herald Investigation

    For more than two years, Brown has investigated corruption, brutality and the systemic, barbaric abuse of inmates in Florida’s prison system, the nation’s third largest. In 2015, Florida prison deaths were at an all-time high, and use of force against inmates had more than doubled in five years. Brown began to examine why and discovered a disturbing pattern of deliberate indifference and even blatant cover-ups among corrections officers, commanders and the agency’s top leaders who often looked the other way as inmates were beaten, starved and killed.
  • Florida Police Shot 574 People: Were they all justified?

    These series were about police-involved shootings in Florida. The stories raise serious questions about abuse of power, excessive force and whether police are always given the benefit of the doubt even when the evidence points to the contrary. NBC 6 was able to give the public a rare look at actions by Miami-Dade Police Department. The series aired before the Ferguson shooting and began drawing national attention to the issue of police shootings when MSNBC rebroadcast part of it. It has helped change county laws. Miami-Dade Police will no longer investigate their own police-involved shootings.